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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Stephen M. Wigley and Pammi Sinha

319

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Wendy Moody, Peter Kinderman and Pammi Sinha

This study sets out to explore the application of psychological research methods (as yet not applied) in the fashion arena. The aim of this project is to quantify…

8617

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to explore the application of psychological research methods (as yet not applied) in the fashion arena. The aim of this project is to quantify, formalise and explore the causal relationships between clothing style, preference, personality factors, emotions and mood with a view to a better understanding of the psychological profile of the fashion consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a uniformly composed sample of females, explorative quantitative research was carried out. Two sets of questionnaires were administered to the sample to examine emotion, mood and personality before trying on a set of eight garments categorized according to style; and again afterwards to examine emotion and mood while wearing each outfit. Photographs of participants were taken wearing each of the outfits. Participants then ranked the eight outfits in order of preference. SPSS analysis identified relationships and preference indicators.

Findings

The results indicated strong relationships between mood and significant relationships between three out of five personality factors and clothing style preference; mood was a significant predictor of preference, whilst personality was moderate.

Research limitations/implications

The research methodology necessitated lengthy time commitments from the participants and therefore limited the sample size, making generalization difficult. Based on the findings, the research requires further exploration of methods for practical application with a larger sample size.

Practical implications

Personality, emotion and mood were shown to be managed and reflected through clothing with implications for assistance in consumer clothing decisions, service training, and strategies for personal shoppers, market segmentation and design.

Originality/value

The methodology derived from a combination of research methods coupled with actual wearing experience, previously not studied together. This is original and demonstrates how important this combination is in order to fully appreciate the psychological profile of the fashion consumer.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Karinna Nobbs, Christopher M. Moore and Mandy Sheridan

Since the concept of the flagship store format was first introduced to retailing in the 1970s, both its form and function have evolved considerably. The highest…

11534

Abstract

Purpose

Since the concept of the flagship store format was first introduced to retailing in the 1970s, both its form and function have evolved considerably. The highest concentration of flagships can be seen in the luxury fashion market. This paper aims first to define the flagship concept in terms of its key characteristics, and second to outline the academic and industry developments, thereby charting its evolution.

Design/methodology/approach

Research was undertaken qualitatively due to the exploratory theory building nature of the subject area and the absence of accepted theoretical frameworks. This took the form of non participant observation and in‐depth interviews with brand representatives within seven major fashion capitals.

Findings

The research identifies essential elements of the luxury store format: its scale and size which usually exceeds functional need; it is derived and built on the twin features of exclusivity and uniqueness; it seeks to offer the customer a justification for their visit. The format evolves and adapts to find new ways of generating and communicating differentiation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide direction for future research in the area, in particular, an opportunity to investigate how luxury flagship stores adapt in order to accommodate market conditions.

Originality/value

The paper delineates the characteristics of the luxury flagship store format and identifies a new characteristic of this format.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Marie‐Cécile Cervellon, Lindsey Carey and Trine Harms

Vintage has been a growing trend in clothing recently, leading to major fashion brands launching collections inspired by vintage pieces or luxury haute‐couture houses…

17629

Abstract

Purpose

Vintage has been a growing trend in clothing recently, leading to major fashion brands launching collections inspired by vintage pieces or luxury haute‐couture houses digging into their archives to revive past designs. Yet, as this market develops, little is known about the profile of the consumer and the motivations to purchase vintage. This paper aims to explore the veracity of a number of assumptions relating to vintage consumption, equating it to the consumption of used, previously owned clothes by nostalgic prone, environmentally‐friendly or value‐conscious consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach including structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed in this research using data collected from 103 women (screened on past second‐hand purchases). Vintage clothes were defined as pieces dating back from the 1920s to the 1980s. Second hand clothes were defined as modern used clothes.

Findings

The results show that the main antecedents to vintage consumption are fashion involvement and nostalgia proneness as well as need for uniqueness through the mediation of treasure hunting. In contrast, second‐hand consumption is directly driven by frugality. Eco‐consciousness plays an indirect role through bargain hunting. In essence, the thrill of the hunt is present for vintage and for second hand consumption. Yet, while vintage consumers shop for a unique piece with history, second‐hand consumers shop for a unique piece at a good price. Additionally, the main characteristics of vintage fashion consumers are a higher level of education and higher income whereas age is not directly related to the purchase of vintage pieces.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the relevance of second‐hand stores repositioning as vintage based on vintage and second‐hand consumers' profiles. Also, the need to educate consumers on the role of second‐hand consumption in a pro‐environmental lifestyle is highlighted.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Lisa Donnell, Karise Hutchinson and Andrea Reid

The purpose of this paper is to identify how small to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) fashion retailers can achieve a true understanding of customer trends to close the…

5604

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how small to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) fashion retailers can achieve a true understanding of customer trends to close the needs to offer gap in a highly dynamic sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A single case study approach is adopted in light of the limited research in this area. Data collection involved a multi‐stage and multi‐methods approach over a six month period to increase the validity of findings and the triangulation of data.

Findings

The findings of this paper highlight, first, the need for formal CRM intervention; and, second, the issues involved in the implementation of a loyalty program.

Originality/value

In the absence of specific knowledge in this area, a framework is developed to advance both theoretical and practical understanding of how SME fashion retailers can build and manage close customer relationships in the new economy.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Klas Hjort and Björn Lantz

The main purpose of this study is to increase the understanding of consumer behaviour with respect to (r)e‐tail borrowing, performed under different (more or less…

1778

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to increase the understanding of consumer behaviour with respect to (r)e‐tail borrowing, performed under different (more or less generous) delivery and return policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was designed as a randomised controlled experiment with a random sample strategy. Among the 192,482 Swedish customers who had made an order at nelly.com during the previous 12 months and were to receive the quarterly nelly.com newsletter in November 2010 by e‐mail, 4,000 were randomly selected and randomised into four groups of 1,000 in each group.

Findings

The experiment revealed certain purchase and return patterns that support the conclusion that (r)e‐tail borrowing behaviour exists in fashion e‐commerce. Evidence was also found that lenient delivery and returns policies seem to reinforce (r)e‐tail borrowing behaviour, albeit not always in expected ways.

Practical implications

Differences in delivery and return policies seem to impact consumer purchase and return behaviour differently depending on the type of item. Therefore a more differentiated view of how to apply them is suggested. Offering the same delivery and return policies to all types of customers and products is generally not optimal with respect to profitability.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the need to consider both delivery and returns policies together with customer and product categories simultaneously when applying them in an e‐commerce context.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Helen Goworek, Tom Fisher, Tim Cooper, Sophie Woodward and Alex Hiller

This paper aims to investigate consumers' perspectives on sustainable clothing consumption and to examine ways in which this information could influence retailers' policies.

19193

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate consumers' perspectives on sustainable clothing consumption and to examine ways in which this information could influence retailers' policies.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was conducted using focus groups, home tasks and workshops with 99 participants. The sample represented different groups of consumers in relation to their sustainability behaviour.

Findings

Focus group participants had a limited awareness of the sustainability impacts of clothing. Where participants displayed pro‐environmental behaviour, this was not necessarily intentional, but was largely a response to other influences. The respondents' maintenance and disposal of clothes were found to be influenced mainly by existing habits and routines, which usually take precedence over awareness of sustainable practice. The research indicated that consumers could be persuaded to change their behaviour in relation to sustainability by being encouraged and enabled to reflect more on their behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses qualitative research and is limited to UK consumers. Future research in this field could incorporate quantitative methods or in‐depth interviews. Academics could conduct further research and generate theories which apply to the sustainable consumption of clothing.

Social implications

The findings have implications for retailers, academics and society. Retailers can develop and implement more sustainable policies and practices in relation to clothing production and consumption. There are wider implications for society and the environment in that retailers' practices can impact greatly on the sustainability of the planet's resources.

Originality/value

This paper's originality lies in its assessment of the implications for retailers of consumers' views on the sustainable consumption of clothing.

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Rachel Ashman and Delia Vazquez

The purpose of this paper is to identify how pure‐play fashion retailers can simulate attachment to their web sites (through trust, loyalty and purchase intentions) by…

4817

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how pure‐play fashion retailers can simulate attachment to their web sites (through trust, loyalty and purchase intentions) by using different communication mediums (static image, moving image, and text/image combination) to overcome the intangible nature of the online sales environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling using AMOS 16.0 are used to test 12 hypothesized relationships generated from the literature review. A sample of 688 female young fashion consumers from The University of Manchester participated in this study.

Findings

There is a clear difference in the build up of attachment when a consumer shops for products communicated via a static or moving image. Static images have direct relationships with trust and purchase intention, whereas moving images are related to building loyalty. Analysis shows that product recommendations (using a combination of text and image) are found to be directly related to developing consumer trust and loyalty towards a pure‐play fashion retailer.

Research limitations/implications

Generalisation of results is limited due to the use of a student sample and the focus on the UK fashion industry. Further development of the constructs used in this study is needed to further test the conceptual model.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to empirically study pure‐play fashion retailing, providing insightful and pragmatic advice by identifying which communication mediums foster trusting and loyal relationships with consumers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Neil Towers

1841

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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