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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Andrew Martin Cox, Pamela McKinney and Paula Goodale

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meaning of information literacy (IL) in food logging, the activity of recording food intake and monitoring weight and other…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the meaning of information literacy (IL) in food logging, the activity of recording food intake and monitoring weight and other health conditions that may be affected by diet, using applications (apps) accessed through mobile devices and personal computers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from a small group of food logging app users through a focus group and interviews. Analysis was informed by practice theory and the growing interest in IL outside educational settings.

Findings

Food logging revolves around the epistemic modality of information, but it is the user who creates information and it is not textual. Food logging is associated with a discourse of focussing on data and downplaying the corporeal information associated with eating and its effect on the body. Social information was an important source for choosing an app, but data were rarely shared with others. Food loggers are very concerned with data quality at the point of data entry. They have a strong sense of learning about healthy eating. They were not well informed about the data privacy and access issues.

Practical implications

Food loggers need to be better informed about data risks around food logging.

Originality/value

This is the first study of food logging from an IL perspective.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Pamela McKinney, Myles Jones and Sandra Turkington

This paper aims to report on the evaluation of a curriculum development project that took place in the Department of Psychology at the University of Sheffield. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on the evaluation of a curriculum development project that took place in the Department of Psychology at the University of Sheffield. The project, funded by a Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CILASS), sought to embed information literacy development in a Level One module using an inquiry‐based learning pedagogical approach. Students worked collaboratively to find news stories that were purportedly based on real psychological research and then searched for the related research paper. They reflected on this task and the differences between the two sources as part of the assessed work for the module.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper synthesizes the results of a number of evaluation instruments (questionnaire, information literacy competency test, focus group, student reflective work) to examine staff and student perceptions of the inquiry task, and how effective the task was in building students' information literacy. A “Theory of Change” evaluation methodology was used to define the scope of evaluation activities.

Findings

The SCONUL Seven Pillars of Information Literacy model is used to structure the findings from the various evaluation methods. Students developed their knowledge of, and ability to search, appropriate academic resources, although they demonstrated a preference for searching via Google Scholar over Web of Knowledge.

Originality/value

Students demonstrated through their reflective comments that they had developed significant abilities to compare and evaluate news stories and journal articles, although they reported a lack of confidence in these abilities. Postgraduate tutors thought the inquiry task was successful in developing students' information literacy and both students and staff responded positively to the ability to choose topics of interest to investigate.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 63 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Book part
Publication date: 30 January 2015

Pamela Jo Brubaker, Michael Horning and Christopher M. Toula

The growth in popularity of new media has led some television networks in the United States to experiment with alternative forms of political debate by encouraging viewers…

Abstract

The growth in popularity of new media has led some television networks in the United States to experiment with alternative forms of political debate by encouraging viewers of all ages to submit video questions to political candidates. Surprisingly, however, experimentation with this new type of debate format in the 2008 U.S. presidential election cycle did not lead to the adoption of new debate formats in the subsequent 2012 election cycle, despite its success with viewing audiences. This study examines various debate formats to understand the value of participatory, user-generated debate question formats versus more traditional debate question formats whereby moderators or live audience members ask presidential candidates scripted questions.

Using a between-subjects experiment, this study examines four types of televised debate formats to assess young adult viewers’ impressions of each format as well as image perceptions of a political candidate and the individual posing the debate question.

The findings suggest debate formats impact perceptions of a political candidate’s image differently for young men and young women. In addition, varying the debate format impacts young voters’ perceptions of debate questioners as well as their overall perceptions of the debate. Implications for viewing audiences are discussed.

U.S. presidential candidates should embrace presidential debate formats that encourage citizens to participate in the political process via new media technologies.

This study shows implementing more engaging and interactive presidential debate formats can positively impact young voters’ perceptions.

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-454-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1984

Pamela S. Bradigan

With today's increase in litigation and consumerism, more and more people are going to public and academic libraries to research their legal questions and problems. Recent…

Abstract

With today's increase in litigation and consumerism, more and more people are going to public and academic libraries to research their legal questions and problems. Recent issues of Library Journal contain full‐page advertisements sponsored by a legal publisher. Two competitive general legal encyclopedias, American Jurisprudence Second and Corpus Juris Secundum, which are commonly referred to as Am. Jur. 2d and C.J.S., are excellent starting points for a search in the law. This article will discuss general legal encyclopedias and examine both of theabove mentioned encyclopedia sets.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

David A. Hales and Gail S. Hales

The purpose of this article is to help acquaint librarians with some of the major resources available regarding Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAS/FAE).

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to help acquaint librarians with some of the major resources available regarding Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAS/FAE).

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 20 December 2000

Stacy Burns

Abstract

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Sociology of Crime, Law and Deviance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-889-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2001

Dov Eden

Abstract

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Exploring Theoretical Mechanisms and Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-846-0

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Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2002

Pamela L. Perrewé and Paul E. Spector

Personality research has played a prominent role in the organizational sciences for a number of years. During the past two decades, however, research examining the impact…

Abstract

Personality research has played a prominent role in the organizational sciences for a number of years. During the past two decades, however, research examining the impact of individual personality traits on emotions, attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors in organizations has increased, and our knowledge of the role of personality within organizational research is stronger. We examine a number of well-known personality dimensions that include the Five-Factor model of personality, locus of control, Type A Behavior Pattern, self-efficacy, and negative affectivity. We also examine a number of promising personality dimensions that have received less attention in the organizational sciences; these include trait anger, positive affectivity, action-state orientation, emotional intelligence, individualism- collectivism, and personal innovativeness. We review the personality research in these areas and offer suggestions for practice and future research.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-973-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Glen E. Holt

This list of 41 “Stupid Things that Libraries Do” was largely culled from public library practitioners’ postings on the PUBLIB electronic discussion list. Libraries must…

Abstract

This list of 41 “Stupid Things that Libraries Do” was largely culled from public library practitioners’ postings on the PUBLIB electronic discussion list. Libraries must take action to ensure that their operations, and particularly their public services, are unhampered by these common bad practices. By identifying possible failings in advance, librarians can better place themselves to meet the expectations of their users, and provide the professional service expected of them.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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