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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Prakash Subedi, Jill Aylott, Naushad Khan, Niki Shrestha, Dayaram Lamsal and Pamela Goff

The purpose of this paper is to outline the “Hybrid” “International” Emergency Medicine (HIEM) programme, which is an ethical pathway for the recruitment, employment and training…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the “Hybrid” “International” Emergency Medicine (HIEM) programme, which is an ethical pathway for the recruitment, employment and training of Emergency Medicine doctors; with a rotation through the NHS on a two-year medical training initiative with a Tier 5 visa, “earn, learn and return” programme. The HIEM programme offers an advantage to the Tier 2 visa by combining training, education and employment resulting in new learning to help improve the health system in Nepal and provide continued cultural support, clinical and leadership development experience in the UK NHS. Finally, this programme also provides a Return on Investment to the NHS.

Design/methodology/approach

A shortage of doctors in the UK, combined with a need to develop Emergency Medicine doctors in Nepal, led to a UK Emergency Medicine Physician (PS) to facilitate collaboration between UK/Nepal partners. A mapping exercise of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine curriculum with the competencies for the health system and quality improvement leaders and partners with patients produced a “HIEM programme”. The HIEM programme aims to develop first-class doctors to study in Emergency Departments in the UK NHS while also building trainee capability to improve the health system in Nepal with a research thesis.

Findings

The HIEM programme has 12 doctors on its programme across years one and two, with the first six doctors working in the UK NHS and progressing well. There are reports of high levels of satisfaction with the trainees in their transition from Nepal to the UK and the hospital is due to save £720,000 (after costs) over two years. Each trainee will earn £79,200 over two years which is enough to pay back the £16,000 cost for the course fees. Nepal as a country will benefit from the HIEM programme as each trainee will submit a health system improvement Thesis.

Research limitations/implications

The HIEM programme is in its infancy as it is two years through a four-year programme. Further evaluation data are required to assess the full impact of this programme. In addition, the HIEM programme has only focussed on the development of one medical speciality which is Emergency Medicine. Further research is required to evaluate the impact of this model across other medical and surgical specialties.

Practical implications

The HIEM programme has exciting potential to support International Medical Graduates undertake a planned programme of development while they study in the UK with a Tier 5 visa. IMGs require continuous support while in the UK and are required to demonstrate continued learning through continuous professional development (CPD). The HIEM programme offers an opportunity for this CPD learning to be structured, meaningful and progressive to enable new learning. There is also specific support to develop academic and research skills to undertake a thesis in an area that requires health system improvement in Nepal.

Originality/value

This is the first time an integrated clinical, leadership, quality improvement and patient partnership model curriculum has been developed. The integrated nature of the curriculum saves precious time, money and resources. The integrated nature of this “hybrid” curriculum supports the development of an evidence-based approach to generating attitudes of collaboration, partnership and facilitation and team building in medical leadership with patient engagement. This “hybrid” model gives hope for the increased added value of the programme at a time of global austerity and challenges in healthcare.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Maura J. Mills and Leanne M. Tortez

We review the state of the literature concerning work–family conflict in the military, focusing on service members’ parenting roles and overall family and child well-being. This…

Abstract

We review the state of the literature concerning work–family conflict in the military, focusing on service members’ parenting roles and overall family and child well-being. This includes recognition that for many women service members, parenting considerations often arise long before a child is born, thereby further complicating work–family conflict considerations in regard to gender-specific conflict factors such as pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum, and breastfeeding. Subsequently, we consider more gender-invariant conflict factors, such as the nature of the work itself as causing conflict for the service member as parent (e.g., nontraditional hours, long separations, and child care challenges) as well as for the child (e.g., irregular contact with parent, fear for parent’s safety, and frequent relocations), and the ramifications of such conflict on service member and child well-being. Finally, we review formalized support resources that are in place to mitigate negative effects of such conflict, and make recommendations to facilitate progress in research and practice moving forward.

Details

Occupational Stress and Well-Being in Military Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-184-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2022

Sarita Cannon

I consider the following question: given my commitment to creating an inclusive classroom environment where students of all backgrounds and skill levels can feel comfortable…

Abstract

I consider the following question: given my commitment to creating an inclusive classroom environment where students of all backgrounds and skill levels can feel comfortable taking emotional and intellectual risks, how do I responsibly teach a course on American Life Writing in which students both read and write narratives of trauma, many of which stem from gender-based violence? With the rise of the #MeToo movement, especially, many survivors of this kind of violence feel compelled to share their stories as a way to heal themselves and to create communities of care and support. In some cases, this kind of disclosure can be restorative. But it is also important to recognize that sharing one's narrative of trauma does not always serve as a path to healing and wholeness. There is also power in choosing to tell part of one's story, sharing one's story only with a certain audience, or not disclosing one's story at all. The works that I assign in the seminar highlight these different paths to healing and model for students the ways in which a confessional model is not the only model for dealing with trauma. In this chapter, I first describe how feminist pedagogy shapes my teaching. Then I outline my approach to teaching life writing, focusing on how I teach texts that highlight trauma and how I teach the personal narrative assignment. Finally, I reflect on how these pedagogical practices might inform our larger conversations about gendered oppression, trauma, and healing.

Details

Trauma-Informed Pedagogy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-497-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Hilary Dyer

Information technology (IT) has been hailed as a great time and paper saver. How far is this true? Are you benefiting as much as you could from the computer on your desk or are…

Abstract

Information technology (IT) has been hailed as a great time and paper saver. How far is this true? Are you benefiting as much as you could from the computer on your desk or are you wasting time learning how to use complex software when it would be more cost‐effective to buy in expertise? This paper looks at what, for some, may be novel ways of using a PC and indicates areas where computer use may not be beneficial. The article is geared towards special libraries, but may have wider applications.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1971

IT IS EASY to make glib generalisations about the student situation in this country, and its associated problems, but a recondite analysis of student mores is much more difficult…

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Abstract

IT IS EASY to make glib generalisations about the student situation in this country, and its associated problems, but a recondite analysis of student mores is much more difficult. Commentators tend to be extreme, varying from those who declaim ‘All for youth and the world well lost’ to those crying ‘Stop their grants, make them do a day's work’, and more in similar vein. An understanding of student attitudes to work and society is one thing, the cause and effect of their attitudes is quite another. What is certain is that there has been a radical change, and the full effects of this change are yet to be felt. Behind each new generation rise those ever ready to decry the follies of youth, but today there is a widespread and differing view held that youth is king, and can do no wrong. Both of these points of view are extreme, and both, in totality, are unjustified.

Details

New Library World, vol. 72 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2007

Leslie B. Hammer, Ellen E. Kossek, Kristi Zimmerman and Rachel Daniels

The goal of this chapter is to present new ways of conceptualizing family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and to present a multilevel model reviewing variables that are…

Abstract

The goal of this chapter is to present new ways of conceptualizing family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and to present a multilevel model reviewing variables that are linked to this construct. We begin the chapter with an overview of the U.S. labor market's rising work–family demands, followed by our multilevel conceptual model of the pathways between FSSB and health, safety, work, and family outcomes for employees. A detailed discussion of the critical role of FSSB is then provided, followed by a discussion of the outcome relationships for employees. We then present our work on the conceptual development of FSSB, drawing from the literature and from focus group data. We end the chapter with a discussion of the practical implications related to our model and conceptual development of FSSB, as well as a discussion of implications for future research.

Details

Exploring the Work and Non-Work Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1444-7

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

NORMAN ROBERTS, Senior Lecturer at Sheffield University school of librarianship, spent three weeks in Nigeria in November/December, running a British Council‐sponsored library…

Abstract

NORMAN ROBERTS, Senior Lecturer at Sheffield University school of librarianship, spent three weeks in Nigeria in November/December, running a British Council‐sponsored library management seminar at Ibadan University Department of Library Studies. Other travellers to Nigeria a week or two earlier were K C Harrison and Hugh Barry, for the inaugural meeting of the Commonwealth Library Association in Lagos. A visitor of longer standing, Ronald Benge, was due back at College of Librarianship Wales before Christmas, after spending last term as visiting Reader at Ahmadu Bello University Department of Librarianship in Zaria, northern Nigeria.

Details

New Library World, vol. 74 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1949

In October we begin our librarianship studies, if we are still students, and never in library history have so many facilities, in whole and in part‐time schools, been available…

Abstract

In October we begin our librarianship studies, if we are still students, and never in library history have so many facilities, in whole and in part‐time schools, been available. It still remains for all library authorities to accept the idea that it is a natural and proper thing for every entrant into library work to come into it, either by way of a library school, or with the intention (and the opportunity) of attending a library school, with aid equivalent to that given in the training of the teacher. In October, too, we note that eight meetings of librarians, three of them week‐end conferences, have been arranged. This is indeed activity and we hope that attendances in all cases justify their organizers. At a more general level, the Election of the Library Association Council occurs this month. Here is a real obligation upon librarians—to elect a Council representative of every library interest, general and special, public and otherwise. Next year, the Centenary Year of public libraries, is a great one for them; we want the best Council for it. We want, however, non‐public librarians to participate in its celebrations.

Details

New Library World, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 52 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1983

SYD and the disabled ‐ Do you remember the International Year of Disabled People? I know we have had Information Technology Year since then and are now in Beautiful Britain Year…

Abstract

SYD and the disabled ‐ Do you remember the International Year of Disabled People? I know we have had Information Technology Year since then and are now in Beautiful Britain Year (which we shall be able to appreciate as soon as the weather lets us), but the good work started during IYDP in 1981 didn't end there. I was reminded of this recently when I received a copy of a remarkable document called the SYD squad report published by Nottinghamshire County Council's Leisure Services. SYD squads (SYD means Survey for the Year of the Disabled) were composed of equal numbers of physically handicapped and able‐bodied young people, engaged under the government backed Youth Training Opportunities Programme, to take a long hard look at everything that affects the lives of disabled people in Nottinghamshire, from personal relationships and access to buildings to leisure, education, employment and welfare. Using questionnaires, disabled ‘guinea‐pigs’ and incognito researchers, the youngsters set out to survey the current ‘state of play’ for the disabled. Their report takes opinion and fact to paint a complete picture of disabled living and prospects for improvement in Nottinghamshire—though its findings are likely to have a much wider impact. Libraries on the whole come out well, though there were difficulties with heavy doors, high counters and use of card catalogues. The height of bookshelves was also mentioned but it was recognised that there was no easy solution to this problem. The report, which is excellently produced and illustrated with photographs and cartoons, is a mine of sensible and practical information that should be of benefit to all whose services are used by the disabled. Copies cost £5.50 from Nottinghamshire County Council, Leisure Services Department, Trent Bridge House, Fox Road, West Bridgford, Nottingham NG2 6BJ.

Details

New Library World, vol. 84 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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