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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Carol Oliver, Sandra Pass, Jayne Taylor and Pam Taylor

An investigation into the process of cross‐fertilisation on MBAprogrammes is reported. An interview schedule was devised as a basis fordiscussions with a sample from each…

Abstract

An investigation into the process of cross‐fertilisation on MBA programmes is reported. An interview schedule was devised as a basis for discussions with a sample from each of three MBA programme types: open, in‐company and consortial. It was concluded that: learning from and acting upon ideas gained from fellow set members is seen as an important element in the MBA programme by associates: cross‐fertilisation tends to be recognised and recalled mainly in terms of personal skills; open sets would potentially appear to be a better medium for fostering cross‐fertilisation, but in‐company sets are more empowering in ensuring the implementation of ideas from such cross‐fertilisation as does occur, while consortial sets would appear to combine the best of both worlds – though no evidence emerged to support this last contention. Recommendations are made for further research.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Carol Oliver, Sandra Pass, Jayne Taylor and Pamela Taylor

A questionnaire‐based survey of a business school′s MBA graduatesdraws conclusions on their entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial leanings.The authors suggest that specific…

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1029

Abstract

A questionnaire‐based survey of a business school′s MBA graduates draws conclusions on their entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial leanings. The authors suggest that specific combinations of personal characteristics and support systems will make implementation of MBA project findings more likely.

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Management Decision, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Ruth Banomyong, Puthipong Julagasigorn, Paitoon Varadejsatitwong and Pairach Piboonrungroj

An understanding of the “AS-IS” stage of a relief operation is the basis for further action in humanitarian supply chain management. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

An understanding of the “AS-IS” stage of a relief operation is the basis for further action in humanitarian supply chain management. The purpose of this paper is to develop a toolbox called the Humanitarian Supply Chain Assessment Tool (HumSCAT). This toolbox is comprised of a set of basic tools which can be classified into each phase of disaster relief.

Design/methodology/approach

The HumSCAT is proposed by paralleling frequently used tools in commercial supply chains with the objectives and characteristics of relief phases. A case study was used to validate the HumSCAT along with six tools provided in the preparation phase.

Findings

The HumSCAT consists of seven tools in the preparation phase, nine tools in the response phase and ten tools in the recovery phase. The case study illustrates how to use the HumSCAT and the six tools. The latter were found to be useful for improving the relief chain.

Research limitations/implications

The list of tools is not exclusive. Other tools might be applicable as long as they meet the objectives and characteristics of the phase. A tool should be adjusted accordingly to the contexts. Tools in other phases should be validated in future research.

Practical implications

The HumSCAT may serve as a reference toolbox for practitioners. Its output can be used for further designing of the “TO-BE” status of humanitarian relief chains.

Originality/value

The HumSCAT is proposed as a toolbox for academics and practitioners involved in humanitarian supply chains.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Meg Bellinger, Pam Kircher, Taylor Surface and Leah Houser

On August 26, 1971, OCLC introduced the online union catalog and shared cataloging system. During the 1970s, OCLC focused its efforts on creating and expanding the online…

Abstract

On August 26, 1971, OCLC introduced the online union catalog and shared cataloging system. During the 1970s, OCLC focused its efforts on creating and expanding the online cataloging system and telecommunications network. It added an online interlibrary loan system in 1979. In the 1980s, OCLC began adapting distributed computing and microcomputing technologies as its product and service lines expanded to some 60 offerings. The organization also began looking at ways to move beyond bibliography by furnishing information not only to library staffs, but also to library patrons. In the 1990s, OCLC launched a new core business in reference services. (Smith, 1998, pp. 251–252). Now, in the 21st century, OCLC is introducing tools, services and infrastructure to manage the life cycle of digital content in libraries.

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-024627-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

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127

Abstract

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Facilities, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Danuta A. Nitecki and Eileen G. Abels

As I make my last contribution as editor of Advances in Librarianship, I would like to say a few words about my twelve years’ experience with this annual. My tenure has…

Abstract

As I make my last contribution as editor of Advances in Librarianship, I would like to say a few words about my twelve years’ experience with this annual. My tenure has greatly enriched my life both professionally and personally. My first association with Advances goes back to 1980 when I was asked to submit an article on library materials budgeting for volume 10. Later, in 1992 I joined Advances as a member of its editorial advisory board. At that time, Irene Godden (Colorado State) edited the volume. I owe her a great debt for her counseling and guidance. After Godden resigned in 1998, I took over as co-editor of Advances and from 2001 (volume 25) I have been its sole editor. Through all these years, I truly enjoyed working with my colleagues on the editorial board and with the many prominent librarians whose papers appeared in Advances. I am especially grateful to Nancy Allen (University of Denver), G. Edward Evans (Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles), and Mary Jean Pavelsek (NYU), longtime editorial board members, who constantly provided encouragement and support. As editor I worked closely with the publishing staff, first at Academic and later Elsevier. I would like to single out both Marvin Yelles (Academic) and Christopher Pringle (Elsevier) and their assistants, Naomi Henning and Julie Neden, for their excellent work in turning manuscripts into the fine finished books that the reader sees.

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Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-024627-4

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Fawzeia Abdulla Al Marzooqi, Matloub Hussain and Syed Zamberi Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to explore certain resources, capabilities and competencies needed to improve the performance of physical asset management (PAM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore certain resources, capabilities and competencies needed to improve the performance of physical asset management (PAM).

Design/methodology/approach

The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used to select and prioritize the most appropriate factors for improving performance. A multi-criteria approach is used to analyze and compare the importance of 6 main criteria and 18 subcriteria identified from a survey of relevant literature.

Findings

The study revealed that not all factors are viewed as having equal importance in improving PAM performance, as three of the main factors attained greater importance among the six factors.

Research limitations/implications

This study explored the factors required for managing assets only within the third stage of asset lifecycle, that is, the utilization stage. It is recommended that future studies be conducted in such a way as to determine the importance of similar factors in the other stages of the asset lifecycle, or to identify new factors and add new criteria.

Practical implications

Knowledge of the differential impacts of the factors on the performance of PAM can impact asset managers and decision makers in their allocation of resources and focus their work on the highest-ranked rather than the lowest-ranked factors. Also, AHP used provides an effective mean for asset managers to identify priorities among decision criteria in their organization.

Originality/value

To date, no study has explored the impact of six combined factors on the performance of PAM. Previous studies have found that these factors each had equal importance. However, their relative ranking in practice and when they appear together have remained unrecognized.

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Property Management, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Kevin Doughty, Andrew Monk, Carole Bayliss, Sian Brown, Lena Dewsbury, Barbara Dunk, Vance Gallagher, Kathy Grafham, Martin Jones, Charles Lowe, Lynne McAlister, Kevin McSorley, Pam Mills, Clare Skidmore, Aileen Stewart, Barbara Taylor and David Ward

The development of telecare services across the UK has been supported by grants from the respective governments of Scotland and Wales, and by the DH in England. New…

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261

Abstract

The development of telecare services across the UK has been supported by grants from the respective governments of Scotland and Wales, and by the DH in England. New services are being established to sometimes operate alongside existing community equipment services and community alarm services. Elsewhere they are embracing a wider range of services including rehabilitation, intermediate care and health services designed to reduce the use of unscheduled care services. This paper discusses the difficulties in understanding the scope of telecare services, and the definitions of services that will need to be confirmed so that service users can choose appropriately if offered direct payments. Two different service models are offered, one of which uses telehealth as an umbrella term to cover all telecare, e‐care and m‐care, and telemedicine where the former includes all such services offered in the service user's home, including those of a medical nature. The second model views telecare alongside assistive technologies and telemedicine as one of three different technology groups designed to make people more independent or to bring care closer to home. There is significant overlap between the three groups, which justifies the introduction of a new term ‐ ARTS (assistive and remote technology services) ‐ to describe this area of support.

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Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Kevin Doughty, Andrew Monk, Carole Bayliss, Sian Brown, Lena Dewsbury, Barbara Dunk, Vance Gallagher, Kathy Grafham, Martin Jones, Charles Lowe, Lynne McAlister, Kevin McSorley, Pam Mills, Clare Skidmore, Aileen Stewart, Barbara Taylor and David Ward

The development of telecare services in the UK has been supported by grants from the respective governments of Scotland and Wales, and by the Department of Health in…

Downloads
167

Abstract

The development of telecare services in the UK has been supported by grants from the respective governments of Scotland and Wales, and by the Department of Health in England. New services are being established, sometimes to operate alongside existing community equipment services and community alarm services. Elsewhere they are embracing a wider range of services including rehabilitation, intermediate care and health services designed to reduce use of unscheduled care services. This paper discusses the difficulties in understanding the scope of telecare services, and the definitions of services that will need to be confirmed if service users are to be able to choose appropriately if offered direct payments. Two service models are offered, one of which uses telehealth as an umbrella term to cover all telecare, e‐care and m‐care, and telemedicine, where the former includes all such services offered in the service user's home, including those of a medical nature. The second model views telecare alongside assistive technologies and telemedicine as one of three technology groups designed to make people more independent, or to bring care closer to home. There is significant overlap between the three groups, which justifies the introduction of a new term ‐ ARTS (assistive and remote technology services) ‐ to describe this area of support.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Zulfiqar Khan, Rajeev K. Bali and Nilmini Wickramasinghe

The last decade has seen much interest in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) from successive UK Governments highlighting the importance of this sector to the…

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2692

Abstract

Purpose

The last decade has seen much interest in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) from successive UK Governments highlighting the importance of this sector to the wealth‐creating process of the UK economy. World‐class manufacturing (WCM) is a set of methodologies that are used by organisations to compete globally and continuously improve their competitiveness. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are now competing at a global level and many are world‐class. The majority of the companies that make up the OEM's supply chains are SMEs. It is, therefore, imperative that SMEs also improve their competitiveness to a world‐class level. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a triangulation methodology consisting of a literature review, analysis of a 150‐company survey and semi‐structured interviews in the development of the business process improvement (BPI) framework and performance assessment methodology (PAM) tool.

Findings

This study advocates a planned and integrated approach for the gradual achievement of WCM in SMEs by a strategy of BPI through continuous improvement and structured training.

Practical implications

The work is of value to SMEs since the study encapsulates the requirements of SME management into the BPI framework and considers their critique of present frameworks; hence a practical framework that is honed for SME application.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need for SMEs to achieve WCM status and offers a novel/practical framework and PAM tool which are timely because the DTI is promulgating the need for SMEs to become world‐class.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 107 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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