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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

David J. Pauleen and Pak Yoong

The development of personal relationships between team members is recognised as an important factor in enhancing effective working relationships among members of both…

Abstract

The development of personal relationships between team members is recognised as an important factor in enhancing effective working relationships among members of both co‐located and virtual teams. However, little has been written on how to build these online relationships among virtual team members. This paper reports part of a qualitative research study on how facilitators of virtual teams build and maintain online relationships. In particular, the paper examines how virtual team facilitators use Internet‐based and conventional electronic communication channels to build relationships with their virtual team members. The findings suggest that some electronic communication channels are more effective than others in building online relationships. The paper concludes by suggesting that facilitators need to strategically use the channels available to them to effectively build online relationships.

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Internet Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Kaye Bentley and Pak Yoong

Describes a case research study into how knowledge workers adopt telework as an alternative work arrangement. It reports how knowledge workers in two New Zealand…

Abstract

Describes a case research study into how knowledge workers adopt telework as an alternative work arrangement. It reports how knowledge workers in two New Zealand organisations organise their workload to take advantage of the information and Internet technology available to them in their work and home environments. The findings of the study indicate that knowledge workers are inclined to use home‐based teleworking as an adjunct to the work done during normal business hours. Their preference is still to work at the office for most of their work time. Discusses the implications of the findings for practice and research.

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Internet Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Pak Yoong

Abstract

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The Electronic Library, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Pak Yoong and Brent Gallupe

Electronic meeting facilitation (e‐facilitation) continues to be a critical success factor in the use of information technology to support face‐to‐face collaborative work…

Abstract

Electronic meeting facilitation (e‐facilitation) continues to be a critical success factor in the use of information technology to support face‐to‐face collaborative work. Yet researchers and practitioners continue to struggle to understand the subtleties and difficulties in the application of meeting facilitation techniques in the ‘electronic’ context. To clarify that understanding, this paper develops a new theoretical framework that examines how technology interacts with human facilitator behavior in an electronic group meeting. This framework, The Dualities of E‐Facilitation, is composed of two dualities: the Duality of Computer and Human Interaction, and the Duality of Routine and Intuitive Actions. The framework emerged from an analysis of the e‐facilitation behaviors of newly trained face‐to‐face electronic meeting facilitators.

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Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

David J. Pauleen, Brian Corbitt and Pak Yoong

To provide a conceptual model for the discovery and articulation of emergent organizational knowledge, particularly knowledge that develops when people work with new technologies.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a conceptual model for the discovery and articulation of emergent organizational knowledge, particularly knowledge that develops when people work with new technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is based on two widely accepted research methods – action learning and grounded theory – and is illustrated using a case study of virtual team leadership, which investigated how virtual team leaders developed relationships with their virtual team members.

Findings

The article demonstrates how action learning and grounded theory – two widely accepted research methods – can be used to discover and articulate new organizational knowledge.

Practical implications

The model allows organizations to gain practical and highly current experiential knowledge from employees working in novel situations, including those using new organizational processes and technologies. Such knowledge can provide competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The article contributes to the areas of knowledge management and particularly organizational learning by providing a method that maps how organizations can learn from novel situations involving people and technology

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Jocelyn Cranefield and Pak Yoong

This paper aims to investigate how online communities of practice facilitate the embedding of personal professional knowledge in a complex online environment.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how online communities of practice facilitate the embedding of personal professional knowledge in a complex online environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This research consisted of exploratory, interpretivist case research, using qualitative methods. Forty‐one individuals from five online communities in a national professional development programme were interviewed. Additional data were drawn from diverse online records. Data were coded via text analysis. A wiki was used for participant feedback.

Findings

Embedding of new knowledge was facilitated by individuals' crossings between different engagement spaces – communication and sense‐making contexts. Community members repeatedly crossed between online and offline, visible and invisible, formal and informal, and reflective and active engagement spaces as they sought to meet diverse needs. As they did this, they had to continually recontextualise knowledge, adapting, varying and personalising it to fit the function, genre and conventions of each engagement space. This promoted the embedding of professional knowledge. The complex online environment in which they operated can be seen as providing a situation of enhanced polycontextuality, within which multiple boundary crossings facilitated strong personalisation. At the community level, knowledge convergence was fostered by the recurrence of dominant, powerful mnemonic themes.

Research limitations/implications

An opportunity exists to investigate the applicability of these findings in other online professional contexts.

Originality/value

The paper extends the concept of boundary crossing to crossings in a polycontextual online environment. It updates literature on communities of practice by outlining the dynamics of a complex online community system. It provides an explanation for how personal knowledge evolves to fit emerging trends and considers how information systems can support deep knowledge transfer.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Pak Yoong

Reports part of a grounded theory study in which 15 facilitators, already experienced in conventional meetings, were trained to become facilitators of face‐to‐face…

Abstract

Reports part of a grounded theory study in which 15 facilitators, already experienced in conventional meetings, were trained to become facilitators of face‐to‐face electronic meetings. Presents a model ‐ “Active reflection” ‐ of the reflective practice processes used by the trainee facilitators. Active reflection is a term which describes the trainees’ accounts of the two complementary action reflection processes: reflection on action (thinking back on what was done) and reflection in action (thinking about the action while one is doing it). Identifies a number of implications for group support systems facilitation training and practice.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Pak Yoong and Brent Gallupe

Effective meeting facilitation is recognised as a critical factor in group support systems (GSS) use but relatively little is known about how organisations can train and…

Abstract

Effective meeting facilitation is recognised as a critical factor in group support systems (GSS) use but relatively little is known about how organisations can train and develop their “electronic meeting facilitators”. This article describes an action learning (AL) approach to the training of GSS facilitators. It begins with a description of the three schools of AL. The application of the “experiential” school of AL in GSS facilitation training is then explained. Finally, the article describes some lessons learned for both practitioners and researchers.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Carmel Joe, Pak Yoong and Kapila Patel

The purpose of this paper is to describe different concepts of valuable knowledge that are perceived to be lost when an older expert departs from a knowledge-intensive

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe different concepts of valuable knowledge that are perceived to be lost when an older expert departs from a knowledge-intensive organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case research methodology and semi-structured interviews involving 17 participants from five small-to-medium enterprises (SME).

Findings

Five concepts of valuable knowledge have emerged from the interviews: subject matter expertise; knowledge about business relationships and social networks; organisational knowledge and institutional memory; knowledge of business systems, processes and value chains; and knowledge of governance.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the research project is restricted to SMEs in New Zealand and this restriction limits the generalisation of the results to other contexts. This study may serve as a starting point for future investigations including larger organisations that may have a greater number of older experts.

Practical implications

By identifying the different types of older experts' knowledge, organisations are able to realise the potential of retaining that knowledge within the organisation.

Originality/value

This is one of the first investigations of the knowledge that older experts in the professional services industry possess within a small-to-medium enterprise context.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Abstract

Details

Internet Research, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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