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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

L. Sulaiman, Z.H.Z. Hazrin, N.I.M. Zakir, N.A. Halim, R.A.A. Rusdi, A.S.A. Khair and H.A. Tajuddin

The effect of using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as an additive in coating paint films for non-stick coatings was studied in this work. This paper aims to discuss the…

Abstract

Purpose

The effect of using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as an additive in coating paint films for non-stick coatings was studied in this work. This paper aims to discuss the benefits of MCC blended in the coating paint film that consists of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and dammar.

Design/methodology/approach

PMMA and dammar mixed at a specific Wt.% ratio with xylene as its solvent. Two sets of mixtures were prepared, where one mixture contained MCC and another, without. The mixtures were applied to metal substrates as coating paint films. The performance of the non-stick coating paint film was observed through the adhesive test between adhesion layers on the coating paint film and also through the cross-hatch test for the adhesion of the non-stick coating paint film to the metal substrate. The results correlate with the surface roughness and glossiness tests.

Findings

The results showed that for the coating paint films, Sample B consisted of 80:20 Wt.% ratio of PMMA-dammar with an addition of 5 Wt.% MCC had an excellent performance as non-stick coating paint films. The MCC formed microparticles on the surface of the coating paint film sample and this causes the coating paint film samples with MCC to develop a rougher surface compared to the coating paint film without MCC. Sample B coating paint film had the highest average surface roughness (Ra) of 383 µm. The cross-hatch test showed the coating paint film with the addition of MCC had stronger adhesiveness on the substrate’s surface thus prevents the coating from peeling off from the surface.

Practical implications

The developed coating paint film in this study would be suitable for outdoor applications to prevent illegal advertisements and stickers.

Originality/value

MCC added to the coating paint film improves the surface performance as a non-stick coating.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

B.N. Acharya, M. Nivsarkar, C. Saxena and M.P. Kaushik

Slow release insecticidal paint formulations had been prepared by incorporating deltamethrin, an additive to impart insecticidal property to the paint formulation. The…

Abstract

Slow release insecticidal paint formulations had been prepared by incorporating deltamethrin, an additive to impart insecticidal property to the paint formulation. The effects of the mode of incorporation of deltamethrin on the retention of the insecticide in the paint matrix, on drying, had been studied. Deltamethrin had been introduced (1 per cent by wt) in the grind and let‐down portions of the paint formulation. Extraction and high performance liquid chromatography studies of the insecticide had been carried out. It has been found that after drying, the paint samples contained a very high concentration of deltamethrin where the insecticide had been added in the grind portion instead of in the let‐down portion of the paint formulation.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1983

P. Whiteley

Advancing technology brings a continual flow of new materials to the building industry, not least in the field of paints and other types of surface coatings. While some of…

Abstract

Advancing technology brings a continual flow of new materials to the building industry, not least in the field of paints and other types of surface coatings. While some of these have not fulfilled the glowing claims made for them and have vanished from the scene, most have shown a balance of advantages and have displaced older traditional products. Who would now exchange emulsion paints for distempers? Yet there often seem to be an underlying resistance and a belief that modern paints are not as durable as older ones, or as ‘good’ in some undefined way.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1955

Assessing protective schemes is not a simple matter and, if done with the necessary thoroughness, takes a very long time. With these facts in mind the British Iron and…

Abstract

Assessing protective schemes is not a simple matter and, if done with the necessary thoroughness, takes a very long time. With these facts in mind the British Iron and Steel Research Association and the British paint industry started four long‐term investigations between 1945 and 1948, involving priming paints, protective paints based on tars and bitumens, metallic coatings and methods of surf ace preparation. The results of these researches have now been published in the third interim report of Joint Panel/1 of B.I.S.R.A. The following notes express the conclusions of the report in severely condensed form.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 2 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

L.S. Hernández, B. del Amo and R. Romagnoli

Substitution of zinc chromate or zinc yellow, traditionally used as anticorrosive pigment, for other phosphate‐based pigments that are not hazardous to health and have the…

Abstract

Substitution of zinc chromate or zinc yellow, traditionally used as anticorrosive pigment, for other phosphate‐based pigments that are not hazardous to health and have the same anticorrosive behaviour or even better, is studied in this paper. Four alkyd paints were specially prepared; two of them contained calcium acid phosphate or micronised zinc phosphate as anticorrosive pigments respectively. A paint containing zinc chromate was used as reference and a paint without anticorrosive pigments was used as a blank, in which the other ingredients were increased proportionally to attain the desired PVC relationship. The corrosion behaviour of low carbon steel panels coated with these paints in a 3 per cent NaCl solution was assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In addition, other painted panels were evaluated by salt spray and humidity chamber tests. Results of all tests showed that the paint with calcium acid phosphate and especially that with micronised zinc phosphate exhibited better behaviour than paint with zinc chromate. Analysis of impedance parameters (ionic resistance and capacitance of the paint film) against immersion time allowed the paints to be ranked in the same order as that obtained with salt spray and humidity chamber tests.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

L. Sulaiman, Z.H.Z. Abidin, S.A.M. Yunus, N.A. Mazni, A.N. Hadi, A.K. Arof and K. Simarani

This paper aims to discuss about the benefits of Cu(NO3)2 applied in coating paint film that consists of plant extract from Cassia Alata. Cu(NO3)2 has been added to the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss about the benefits of Cu(NO3)2 applied in coating paint film that consists of plant extract from Cassia Alata. Cu(NO3)2 has been added to the coating paint film as a colour stabilizer and as an antifungal property by forming a zone of inhibition towards fungal growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The coating paint film resin consists of a mixture of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and acrylic polyol. The coating paint film’s performances were observed in terms of visible optical and physical appearance.

Findings

When exposed to the fungus Trichoderma Sp., a zone of inhibition of 208 mm2 was formed around the coating paint film and therefore it gave the coating paint films an antifungal property. The commission internationale de l’éclairage (CIE) L*a*b* colour coordinate system was used to identify the colour changes in the coating paint film and it was found that the addition of Cu(NO3)2 to the coating paint film has a better colour stability, as it has a lower standard deviation (STD) value of 6.46 than the pure dye coating paint film of 8.95. The gloss of coating paint film with the addition of Cu(NO3)2 was found to be have a more stable gloss based on its smaller STD value at both angles taken at 20° and 60°.

Research limitations/implications

The Cassia Alata plant has different amount of antifungal properties based on location its growth.

Practical implications

The coating paint film developed in this study is suitable for indoor applications.

Originality/value

The plant extract from the Cassia Alata gives the coating paint film an antifungal property.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Edgar S. Lower

Gelation that can occur when copper or aluminium bronze powder is permitted to stand in nitrocellulose lacquer can be prevented by the addition of below one percent of…

Abstract

Gelation that can occur when copper or aluminium bronze powder is permitted to stand in nitrocellulose lacquer can be prevented by the addition of below one percent of lauric acid. Butyl acetyl ricinoleate will impart highgloss, plasticity, pliability to nitro‐cellulose lacquers and impart permanence, and improves the ageing properties and low temperature flexibility to the product. Acrylic coatings of improved gloss and pattern control have been provided by the addition of methyl hydroxystearate. When barium α‐sulphostearate is added to interior or exterior paints it can produce films of improved hardness. Methyl linoleate can be employed to retard the hardening of Japanese film lacquer. Compositions with good heat stability and good thixotropic properties and which are suitable for use as a base for paints have been evolved by reacting hydrogenated castor oil with toluene di‐isocyanate and emulsifiable and polyethylene wax. The use of aluminium stearate in paints at elevated temperatures can result in films of high opacity, good build, sag resistance, heavy pigmented tolerance and good sealing properties. Myristic acid‐based alkyd aryl ketones have been utilised to impart lustre to wooden surfaces, and stearic acid terminated polyamide/polyimide for coatings for electrical insulators of magnetic wire have been applied to give improved lustre. Diethylene glycol esters of dilinoleic acid can be used to produce non‐drip paints, as can ethylene diamine bis hydroxystearate, and glyceryl trihydroxystearate. Hydrogenated castor oil is useable in the making of thixotropic agents applicable to paints have been prepared from the material, plus oligomers of hydroxystearic acid/ethylenediamine/sebacic acid polymers. Ethyl linoleate and ethyl linoleate have been used as penetrants in anti‐corrosive paints based upon alkyd resins. Aluminium stearate can prevent excess penetration by paints of surfaces. Bis (hydroxymethyl) propanediol oleate has found use in alkyd resins derivative coatings with butylated melamine resins‐hardening materials to give pinhole resistant coatings. Butyl stearate is a good low temperature plasticiser for paints. Butyl acetyl ricinoleate imparts good plate release and cold crack resistance to leather lacquers, and provides good handle and excellent low temperature flexibility to coated fabrics on thick unsupported sheetings.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1956

N.J. Read

Calcium plumbate constitutes an important and novel addition to the few existing rust‐inhibitive pigments for the protection of iron and steel. Like red lead it provides…

Abstract

Calcium plumbate constitutes an important and novel addition to the few existing rust‐inhibitive pigments for the protection of iron and steel. Like red lead it provides protection by a combination of basic and oxidising characteristics, as well as film‐forming properties by interaction with linseed oil. It is believed to passify both cathodic and anodic areas on iron and steel, and in this respect differs from other rust‐inhibitive pigments. In practice, it shows the behaviour which on theoretical grounds might be expected to be associated with this type of inhibition. Linseed oil paints based on calcium plumbate have been found to be remarkably free from any tendency to crack, and their adhesion on galvanised iron and timber suggests the value of suck paints as primers with a wide variety of applications.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2009

Heping Chen, Thomas Fuhlbrigge and Xiongzi Li

Paint path planning for industrial robots is critical for uniform paint distribution, process cycle time and material waste, etc. However, paint path planning is still a…

Abstract

Purpose

Paint path planning for industrial robots is critical for uniform paint distribution, process cycle time and material waste, etc. However, paint path planning is still a costly and time‐consuming process. Currently paint path planning has always caused a bottle‐neck for manufacturing automation because typical manual teaching methods are tedious, error‐prone and skill‐dependent. Hence, it is essential to develop automated tool path‐planning methods to replace manual paint path planning. The purpose of this paper is to review the existing automated tool path‐planning methods, and investigate their advantages and disadvantages.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of a review of automated tool path‐planning methods, to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the current technologies.

Findings

Paint path planning is a very complicated task considering complex parts, paint process requirements and complicated spraying tools. There are some research and development efforts in this area. Based on the review of the methods used for paint path planning and simulation, the paper concludes that: the tessellated CAD model formats have many advantages in paint path planning and paint deposition simulation. However, the tessellated CAD model formats lack edge and connection information. Hence, it may not be suitable for some applications requiring edge following, such as welding. For the spray gun model, more complicated models, such as 2D models, should be used for both path planning and paint distribution simulation. Paint path generation methods should be able to generate a paint path for complex automotive parts without assumptions, such as presupposing a part with a continuous surface.

Practical implications

The paper makes possible automated path generation for spray‐painting process using industrial robots such that the path‐planning time can be reduced, the product quality improved, etc.

Originality/value

The paper provides a useful review of current paint path‐planning methodologies based on the CAD models of parts.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1968

H.G. Daniel

IF paint is applied to a blasted surface in sufficient quantity the wet film will form a plane surface (neglecting variations in thickness due to spray pattern or brush…

Abstract

IF paint is applied to a blasted surface in sufficient quantity the wet film will form a plane surface (neglecting variations in thickness due to spray pattern or brush marks) and there will be a greater thickness of paint over hollows than over the peaks. This condition can be accentuated if, in addition, paint flows from peaks to hollows during the drying process. When multi‐coat schemes are applied the surface profile is filled progressively by successive coats of paint (see Fig. 1); if sufficient paint is applied the dry paint/air surface may approximate to a plane. Estimates of paint requirements, albeit approximate ones, can only be properly made on the assumption that this condition will be attained.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 15 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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