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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Roberta Sammut, Benjamin Briffa and Elizabeth A. Curtis

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between perceived distributed leadership and job satisfaction among nurses. Leadership is central to improving…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between perceived distributed leadership and job satisfaction among nurses. Leadership is central to improving quality care. Reports following investigations of poor care standards, identified inadequate leadership as a contributory factor and called for a new kind of leadership. One alternative is distributed leadership. Evidence suggests associations between leadership and job satisfaction but, there is a paucity of research examining associations between distributed leadership and job satisfaction: the purpose of this study was to address this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey design was used and data collected via questionnaires. Using census sampling, 350 nurses in a hospital in Malta were selected. A response rate of 50% (n =176) was achieved. Data were analysed using Spearman’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression. Ethical approval was obtained from relevant committees/individuals.

Findings

Results indicated a moderate application of perceived distributed leadership and application of all components of distributed leadership could be improved. Nurses were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with their jobs. Correlation analysis showed a positive relationship between distributed leadership and job satisfaction. Multiple regression showed that commitment and participative decision-making were major predictors of job satisfaction while supervision by managers had a negative effect.

Practical implications

Improving distributed leadership is a priority in the nursing profession.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to show that distributed leadership has a positive effect on job satisfaction among nurses. Supervision, a constituent of distributed leadership, was associated with reduced job satisfaction, therefore reducing this is paramount.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Case study
Publication date: 17 September 2016

Ragini N. Mohanty and Richa Shah

The subject area is entrepreneurship.

Abstract

Subject area

The subject area is entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

Graduate and executive education level in leadership, entrepreneurship and strategic management are used to discuss leadership, entrepreneurship and strategy in health services.

Case overview

This case talks about the passionate journey of a pediatrician practicing in the Mumbai city of India, who as an individual private practitioner is contributing to the fulfilment of the global health agenda and the fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG) – “reduce child mortality”. His vision is to make quality and affordable expert pediatric care accessible to all the individuals, right from pre-birth to adulthood. Surya Mother and Child Care Hospital (SMCH) is being strengthened as a nation-wide network of mother and child hospital offering patient/consumer-centric integrated collaborative quality care, and it needs to be seen how this model can be made sustainable as it enlarges in scale for the future.

Expected learning outcomes

The case is structured to achieve the following learning outcomes: to understand about effectuation as a logic for entrepreneurial success through the lens of Dr Avasthi and his venture SMCH; To understand and apply Porter’s Principles of value transformation that essentially focus on outcome-driven cost-efficient work practices in a collaborative integrative fashion, where transformation must come from within (some practices suggested can be applied to the Indian Healthcare Services Delivery systems); to critically analyze the overall strategic position of SMCH as an organization and its competitive environment; to discuss the factors influencing health-care delivery capacity build up, given the MDGs 2015, Every Newborn Action Plan and Indian Newborn Action Plan framework, as applicable to India; and to discuss and analyze mechanisms for future sustainable service delivery options for SMCH. Although each of these principles is important, possibly, the instructor could emphasize and encourage more discussions on potential models of shared partnerships that can help quality health-care services reach the unreached and the incorporation of technology in achieving this. The learning process can also facilitate discussions about leadership qualities in the creation of health-care entrepreneurs, for the “Change That They Would Want To See”.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS:3 Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Maram Gamal Katoue, Dalal Al-Taweel, Kamal Mohamed Matar and Samuel B Kombian

The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this service.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive, qualitative study about PN practices was conducted from June 2012 to February 2013 in Kuwait. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews with the head total parenteral nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at seven hospitals using a developed questionnaire. The questionnaire obtained information about the PN service at each hospital including the existence of nutritional support teams (NSTs), PN preparation practices, quality controls and guidelines/protocols. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for content.

Findings

Seven hospitals in Kuwait provided PN preparation service through TPN units within hospital pharmacies. Functional NSTs did not exist in any of these hospitals. All TPN units used paper-based standard PN order forms for requesting PN. The content of PN order forms and PN formulas labeling information were inconsistent across hospitals. Most of the prepared PN formulas were tailor-made and packed in single compartment bags. Quality controls used included gravimetric analysis and visual inspection of PN formulations, and less consistently reported periodic evaluation of the aseptic techniques. Six TPN units independently developed PN guidelines/protocols.

Originality/value

This study revealed variations in many aspects of PN practices among the hospitals in Kuwait and provided recommendations to improve this service. Standardization of PN practices would enhance the quality of care provided to patients receiving PN and facilitate national monitoring. This can be accomplished through the involvement of healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition support working within proactive NSTs.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2020

Roberta Guglielmetti Mugion and Elisa Menicucci

The aim of this study is to undertake a systemic literature review (SLR) of horticultural therapy and to explore whether its inclusion in a healthcare programme can…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to undertake a systemic literature review (SLR) of horticultural therapy and to explore whether its inclusion in a healthcare programme can enhance hospitalised children's well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was developed using a mixed methods approach to monitor stakeholders' perceptions of horticultural therapy. Specifically, hospitalised children (N = 31) and their families (N = 21), as well as medical and nursing staff (N = 3), were engaged in the empirical study. Qualitative and quantitative surveys were developed, involving two paediatric units in an Italian hospital.

Findings

The authors’ findings show a significant improvement of children's mood and psycho-physical well-being following horticultural therapy. The authors found positive effects of interactive horticultural therapy on hospitalised paediatric patients and their parents. Parents perceived a positive influence on their mood and found the therapy very beneficial for their children. Qualitative analyses of children's and parents' comments (and related rankings) revealed the helpful support role of horticultural therapy in dealing with the hospitalisation period. There is a very limited number of studies that have inspected co-therapy implementation in paediatric hospitals, and to the best of the authors' knowledge, no study has yet examined the effect of horticultural therapy in such a context. The practice of horticultural therapy with children in health settings has been documented in some Italian hospitals, but its effectiveness has not yet been well established in the literature.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings could provide useful insights to clinicians, health managers and directors in creating and sustaining a successful group co-therapy programme under the managed healthcare system.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Thomas J. Caruso, Juan Luis Sandin Marquez, Melanie S. Gipp, Stephen P. Kelleher and Paul J. Sharek

No studies have examined preoperative handoffs from the intensive care unit (ICU) to OR. Given the risk of patient harm, the authors developed a standardized ICU to OR…

Abstract

Purpose

No studies have examined preoperative handoffs from the intensive care unit (ICU) to OR. Given the risk of patient harm, the authors developed a standardized ICU to OR handoff using a previously published handoff model. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether a standardized ICU to OR handoff process would increase the number of team handoffs and improve patient transport readiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The intervention consisted of designing a multidisciplinary, face-to-face handoff between sending ICU providers and receiving anesthesiologist and OR nurse, verbally presented in the I-PASS format. Anticipatory calls from the OR nurse to the ICU nurse were made to prepare the patient for transport. Data collected included frequency of handoff, patient transport readiness, turnover time between OR cases, and anesthesia provider satisfaction.

Findings

In total, 57 audits were completed. The frequency of handoffs increased from 25 to 86 percent (p<0.0001) and the frequency of patient readiness increased from 61 to 97 percent (p=0.001). There were no changes in timeliness of first start cases and no significant change in turnover times between cases. Anesthesia provider satisfaction scores increased significantly.

Practical implications

A standardized, team based ICU to OR handoff increased the frequency of face-to-face handoffs, patient readiness and anesthesia provider satisfaction within increasing turnover between cases.

Originality/value

Although studies have identified the transition of patients from the ICU to the OR as a period of increased harm, the development of a preoperative ICU to OR handoff had not been described. This intervention may be used in other institutions to design ICU to OR transitions of care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 23 April 2020

Sathiyanathan Harisuthan, Hashan Hasalanka, Devmini Kularatne and Chandana Siriwardana

This paper aims to identify the specific parameters in developing a framework to assess the structural vulnerability of hospital buildings in Sri Lanka against tsunami…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the specific parameters in developing a framework to assess the structural vulnerability of hospital buildings in Sri Lanka against tsunami. Along with that, the adaptability and suitability of the existing global frameworks in the Sri Lankan context are to be assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, Papathoma tsunami vulnerability assessment (PTVA)-4 model was used as the base in developing the abovementioned framework. Its adaptability and suitability in assessing hospital buildings in the country were considered under the case studies conducted in six selected hospitals in the Southern coastal belt of Sri Lanka. Under these case studies, data collection was done using the Rapid Visual Screening method where assessments were carried out through visual observations. The collected data were analyzed according to the aforementioned model for its suitability in evaluating the structural vulnerability of hospitals in Sri Lanka, against tsunami hazard.

Findings

From these case studies, it was identified that the use of the PTVA-4 model alone was insufficient to assess the structural vulnerability of the hospital buildings against the tsunami. Therefore, the model must be further improved with more relevant assessing attributes related to hospitals, suitable for the Sri Lankan context.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the specific structural assessment parameters required in assessing hospitals in the coastal belt of Sri Lanka, considering tsunami as the main hazard condition.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Christian Gadolin, Erik Eriksson and Patrik Alexandersson

The aim of this paper is to empirically describe and analyze factors deemed to be relevant for the successful provision of coordinated paediatric oncology care by…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to empirically describe and analyze factors deemed to be relevant for the successful provision of coordinated paediatric oncology care by physicians and nurses involved.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study primarily consisting of interviews.

Findings

The paper's findings indicate that certain factors (i.e. distinct mission, clear treatment protocols and support from external stakeholders) relevant for the provision of coordinated paediatric oncology care have not received sufficient attention in previous research. In addition, emphasis is placed on the necessity of facilitating constructive working relationships and a bottom-up perspective when pursuing improved care coordination.

Originality/value

The factors described and analyzed may act as insights for how paediatric oncology might be improved in terms of care coordination and thus facilitate care integration. In addition, the paper's findings identify factors relevant for further empirical studies in order to delineate their generalizability.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Lyn Martin

Although the nursing profession is a largeoccupational group and a major part of the NationalHealth Service, surprisingly little is known aboutthe demand for and supply of…

Abstract

Although the nursing profession is a large occupational group and a major part of the National Health Service, surprisingly little is known about the demand for and supply of nurses. Current demographic trends, however, have ensured that a traditional “easy in/easy out” model of recruitment and retention, with high wastage rates during and after training, is being replaced by the idea that nurse education is a valuable and expensive investment and trained nurses must be encouraged to view nursing as a life‐time career. In 1988 there was considerable media interest in shortages of skilled nurses. A number of factors are examined, relevant to assessing whether there are such shortages. In particular, the demand for nurses, manpower and financial aspects of supply, recruitment and retention, and skill mix are considered. Two groups of nurses in which there are said to be shortages are briefly discussed: paediatric intensive care and community mental handicap and mental illness nurses.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Samantha Kibblewhite, Sue Bowker and Huw R. Jenkins

A healthy, balanced and nutritious diet for children and young people is essential for normal growth and development. Vending machines can be a source of food and drink…

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Abstract

Purpose

A healthy, balanced and nutritious diet for children and young people is essential for normal growth and development. Vending machines can be a source of food and drink high in fat, sugar and salt, and can undermine healthy eating messages. The purpose of this paper is to examine the contents of vending machines available in the vicinity of paediatric wards and paediatric out‐patient departments in hospitals in Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires are completed by staff in the Department of Child Health in each NHS Trust in Wales. This paper summarises the results.

Findings

Most vending machines found in the vicinity of paediatric wards and paediatric out‐patient departments in hospitals in Wales contain a majority of foods high in fat salt and sugar. Only a few contain over 50 per cent of drinks classified as healthy.

Research limitations/implications

There is no universally agreed definition of healthy food as related to individual products. This study looks at the availability of foods and drinks classified as “unhealthy” but does not look at the overall diet of the children in the ward.

Practical implications

The results of this study should encourage NHS Trusts to consider the contents of vending machines in the vicinity of paediatric wards and paediatric out‐patient departments in hospitals.

Originality/value

There is much rhetoric around the potential of vending machines to contribute to an unhealthy diet. This is the first paper to identify specific problems with hospital vending machines.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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