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Article

Pablo Zoghbi-Manrique-de-Lara and Maryamsadat Sharifiatashgah

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the relationship between crowding perceptions (i.e. employees’ perceptions of insufficient personal space due to offices 

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the relationship between crowding perceptions (i.e. employees’ perceptions of insufficient personal space due to offices’ physical constraints) and deviant workplace behaviors (DWBs) directed at both the organization as a whole (DWB-O) and individuals (DWB-I); and second, privacy invasion from supervisors and peers as a mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 299 respondents working in open-plan offices at four medium-to-large sized IT-based companies. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, the paper suggests that under crowding conditions employees can perceive the physical workspace as a space-related resource that is threatened leading them to engage in DWBs out of a conservation strategy.

Findings

Structural equation modeling results significantly supported main effects of employees’ crowding perceptions on the two types of DWBs, with privacy invasion from supervisors and peers as full mediator.

Research limitations/implications

The study could suffer from mono-method/source bias, and specificities of the studied IT-based companies and their work can raise concerns about the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that a proper physical office arrangement can be a useful tool for managers in combating employee DWB.

Originality/value

To date, the origin of workplace deviance has mainly been investigated in terms of the psychosocial work environment; however, the physical labor conditions (i.e. the layout of buildings, furniture, workspace, air conditioning, workplace density, etc.) have received little systematic attention.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Pablo Zoghbi-Manrique-de-Lara and Rita M. Guerra-Báez

This paper aims to model staff reactions to a hotel based on the way they perceive hotel’s treatment of customers. It suggests that employees are not motivated to help…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to model staff reactions to a hotel based on the way they perceive hotel’s treatment of customers. It suggests that employees are not motivated to help abused customers in the form of customer-oriented behaviors (COBs) until employees also feel that they are victims of abuse by the hotel. Hence, effects of staff’s unfavorable justice perceptions for customers on employee COBs are expected to be negative until staff’s unfavorable justice perceptions for themselves, interacting in this relationship, turn it positive.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on social exchange and compassion theories, the argument is made that staff members who are also victims of abuse by the hotel can empathize more with guests, turning quid pro quo responses to abuse of customers into compassionate responses.

Findings

Regression results from a field study of 280 employees at ten hotels in the Canary Islands provide general support for our hypotheses.

Practical implications

By understanding when and why (un)fair treatment of guests and staff has consequences for the hotel in the form of COBs, hotel managers can favor a better staff response to hotels’ careful stewardship of the service encounter in terms of COBs. The reversal of the direction in the relationship suggests the unfolding of compassion within a justice framework, which challenges the long-lived perceived incompatibility between compassion and justice in the organizational literature.

Originality/value

The present study is the first one to study COBs stemming either from staff responses to hotels’ abuse of customers or COBs resulting from the interaction between perceived justice for customers and justice perceptions for themselves.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Pablo Zoghbi-Manrique-de-Lara and Rita M. Guerra-Báez

This paper aims to incorporate the justice framework of hospitality and marketing literature into the bus service user research to extend our knowledge about whether and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to incorporate the justice framework of hospitality and marketing literature into the bus service user research to extend our knowledge about whether and why visitors on a local daytrip within a travel destination display behavioral intentions to revisit that destination. Because prior studies show that perceived justice leads customers to positive outcomes, the authors suggest that when bus service is provided fairly, it is more able to elicit feelings of satisfaction with the bus service in same-day visitors. This satisfactory context, in turn, leads same-day visitors to experience feelings of destination loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 105 day visitors on 48 bus arrivals to Las Palmas city from the southern area of Gran Canaria Island (Spain). The authors used partial least squares regression (SmartPLS 20) to test the relationships.

Findings

Although the studied relationships may be dynamic over time, and a cross-sectional method might seem useless in accounting for them, results support that the more fairly the bus operator treats the daytrip visitors, the more they express intentions to revisit the destination, with service satisfaction acting as a full mediator that explains this link.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that by promoting fair treatment on local daytrips, the travel destination, through the bus transport, is communicating to same-day visitors a collective effort to provide happy and successful local visits within the destination, thus contributing to the overall attractiveness of the destination.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first empirical studies to provide a justice-based framework for understanding why tourists’ experiences during their local movements by bus within a destination could encourage these tourists to revisit the destination.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article

Pablo Zoghbi-Manrique-de-Lara, Mercedes Viera-Armas and Gabriel De Blasio García

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the appearance of cyberloafing at work, that is, the use of the company’s internet connection for personal purposes, may be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the appearance of cyberloafing at work, that is, the use of the company’s internet connection for personal purposes, may be due to a workplace that lacks mindfulness and compassion. The authors first hypothesize that supervisors’ mindfulness is related to the mindfulness of their direct followers, and that both are related to employees’ compassion at work. The authors also hypothesize that compassion mediates the link between supervisors’ and followers’ mindfulness and cyberloafing, and that empathic concern mediates the link from compassion to cyberloafing.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was distributed to followers working in groups of three with the same leader in all of the 100 banks in London (UK). Supervisors and their direct reports (n=100) and 100 triads of followers (n=300) participated. The authors applied structural equation modeling (SEM) for analyses.

Findings

Results showed that supervisors’ and followers’ mindfulness were significantly related to each other and to compassion at work, but compassion acted as a mediator only in the case of supervisors’ mindfulness. Empathic concern mediated the compassion-cyberloafing link.

Research limitations/implications

The study could suffer from mono-method/source bias and specificities of banks and their work processes can raise concerns about the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that mindfulness training may facilitate compassion at work, which, in turn, will restrain the occurrence of cyberloafing at work.

Originality/value

This is the first study to analyze how and why employees refrain from harming their organizations out of compassion.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article

Pablo Zoghbi-Manrique-de-Lara and Jyh-Ming Ting-Ding

This study aims to hypothesize that the more in-house staff perceive themselves as beneficiaries of the procedural justice (PJ) followed in the outsourcing, or perceive…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to hypothesize that the more in-house staff perceive themselves as beneficiaries of the procedural justice (PJ) followed in the outsourcing, or perceive their outsourced peers as recipients of distributive (DJ) and interactional justice (IJ), the more they will show acceptance and positive evaluations of the outsourcing initiatives. Although prior research in the hospitality industry has extensively studied individual-level reactions to organizational justice, no study has been undertaken to examine how hotel staff support and value outsourcing initiatives based on the way they perceive management’s treatment of them and their peers.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire data from 215 in-house employees working side-by-side with outsourced employees at 14 hotels in Gran Canaria (Spain) were analyzed by using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results found that in-house employees who perceived themselves or their outsourced peers as recipients of organizational justice to a greater extent reported greater support for outsourcing by expressing higher levels of acceptance and better evaluations. The results also supported procedural justice (PJ) as playing a dominant role over distributive (DJ) and interactional justice (IJ).

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that by encouraging justice perceptions among in-house employees, mainly those related to properly discussing the outsourcing procedures with affected employees, hotel managers can promote successful outsourcing. Given that in-house employees reacted not only to the way they were treated by hotel management but also to the way their outsourced peers were treated, the findings also indicate that all (un)fair treatment in outsourcing, regardless of the recipient, should receive explicit attention by hotel managers.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to primarily focus on the individual level of analysis in examining and supporting organizational justice in hotel firms as a factor influencing outsourcing success.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Pablo Zoghbi-Manrique-de-Lara and Pablo Ruiz-Palomino

This paper aims to test whether servant leaders lead followers to socially interact more frequently, closely and personally with peers, and if this social interaction…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test whether servant leaders lead followers to socially interact more frequently, closely and personally with peers, and if this social interaction links servant leaders with employees’ personal social capital, both in terms of bonding (networks linking employees of a similar kind) and bridging (networks linking agents of different kinds).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 403 employees from 59 large Spanish hotels. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal that servant leadership has a positive effect on bonding and bridging, which is mediated by employees’ social interactions with peers inside and outside their groups, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that hotel managers should adopt servant leadership to facilitate social interactions at work, thus allowing employees to individually gain personal assets that improve the hotel’s social capital resources.

Originality/value

This is the first study to analyze whether servant leadership shapes personal social capital in business settings. Moreover, it is the first to show the mechanisms (social interactions with peers inside and outside their groups) through which managerial servant leadership encourages this valuable personal asset in hotels.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Pablo Zoghbi Manrique De Lara

This study presents “cybercivism” as the one extra‐role IT behavior that, seeking an opposite direction to cyberloafing, tries to capture the organizational citizenship…

Abstract

This study presents “cybercivism” as the one extra‐role IT behavior that, seeking an opposite direction to cyberloafing, tries to capture the organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) that employees show through Internet use. Just as prior research offers empirical evidence that work attitude is an OCB antecedent, the model tested suggests that employees’ positive attitudes toward several work elements could also explain cybercivism. These work elements include attitudes toward their coworkers, supervisors, organizational leaders in general, their own tasks, clients, and toward themselves (self‐esteem). Data were collected from 154 of the 758 (20.32 per cent) nonteaching employees of a Spanish public university. Structural equation modeling results show that the attitudes toward the clients, the supervisor, and self‐esteem, effectively promote cybercivism. Other analyzed attitudes did not reveal significance. Implications of the results for the prediction and monitoring of cybercivism are discussed, and future research directions are offered.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

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Article

Pablo Zoghbi‐Manrique‐de‐Lara

Despite the large number of empirical studies on employee attitudes and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), the amount of research on the possible role of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the large number of empirical studies on employee attitudes and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), the amount of research on the possible role of concurrent fairness and satisfaction in citizenship behaviors (OCBs) has been quite limited. Since it has been suggested that fair systems in an organization could indicate satisfaction, the purpose of this study is to propose using task satisfaction as a mediating variable in the relationship between procedural justice (PJ) and citizenship OC behaviors directed at the organization as a whole (OCBOs).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of non‐teaching staff at a university, and structural equation modeling was to be used for testing the relationships. The author argues that when organizational procedures are fairly implemented, they may lead employees to feeling happier about their tasks. Ths task satisfaction, in turn, would create a context prone to encouraging employees' compliance with the organization (conscientiousness) and active interest (civic virtue) in it, as well as tolerance to less than ideal circumstances (sportsmanship). The author suggests that it is in this satisfactory context where citizenship behaviors helping the organization (OCBOs) really occur.

Findings

Sequential χ2 difference test results indicated that PJ positively influenced task satisfaction and had a positive effect on citizenship directed at the organization (OCBOs) through its effect on employee task satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The study could suffer from mono‐method/source bias, and the university that supplied the sample has certain job conditions similar to those found in the public sector, thus raising concerns about the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that the scenario presented in our study leads to new and better understanding of how to promote citizenship directed at the organization (OCBOs). Since PJ predicts citizenship behaviors by eliciting task satisfaction, preparing the workplace with actions designed to “gain” task satisfaction, promote a fair system, and provide fair ways to establish tasks appears to be an efficient satisfaction‐producing strategy in promoting citizenship behaviors (OCBs).

Originality/value

Although fairness and satisfaction have been found to be significant attitudinal predictors of OCBs, no previous empirical studies have examined and supported the mediating role task satisfaction plays in explaining why PJ is able to predict citizenship behaviors directed at the organization (OCBOs).

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article

Pablo Zoghbi‐Manrique de Lara and Domingo Verano‐Tacoronte

The purpose of this paper is to test an explanation of how procedural justice (PJ) – a specific type of organizational justice that reflects how fairly organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test an explanation of how procedural justice (PJ) – a specific type of organizational justice that reflects how fairly organizational procedures are designed – may influence deviant workplace behavior targeting at the organization (DWB‐O). The model proposes that PJ affects DWB‐O through its influence on perceived normative conflict (PNC) with the organization. This influence, in turn, would prompt employees to reciprocate with DWB‐O.

Design/methodology/approach

In the paper, data were collected from 270 (17.46 per cent) of the 1,547 teachers at a Spanish university by intranet.

Findings

The paper finds that the structural equation modeling (SEM) results suggest that PJ is an antecedent to PNC, which fully mediates a confirmed direct – but weak – PJ relationship with DWBO.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that the researched teachers' job conditions are inherent to the peculiarities of the public sector that may limit the ability to extrapolate the findings in the private sector. The findings offer a better understanding of the way PJ is able to affect deviant behaviors. The findings also provide a more easily understood mechanism of the influence of procedural justice on DWB‐O.

Practical implications

Results in this paper suggest that actions designed to promote PJ may be useful in communicating how companies are trying to introduce normative harmony in the workplace. Future lines of research are also offered.

Originality/value

The paper sees that the study of the mediating role that perceived normative conflict (PNC) may play in linking perceptions of PJ to DWBO is unprecedented in organizations.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Pablo Zoghbi Manrique de Lara

This study examines the relationship between interactional justice, which is a specific type of organizational justice perception that reflects how a person is treated by…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship between interactional justice, which is a specific type of organizational justice perception that reflects how a person is treated by an authority, and workplace internet deviance (or Cyberloafing) as a category of deviant workplace behavior. The tested model suggests that interactional justice affects cyberloafing by influencing fear of formal punishment –as an intimidation construct– which, in turn, prompts employees to reciprocate with deviant workplace internet behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 147 (19.4 percent) of the 758 non‐teaching staff at a Spanish public university. Accessibility of individual e‐mail accounts was similar for all employees. E‐mails asking for collaboration were sent in two phases. A questionnaire was posted on the university Intranet and could be accessed by clicking on a link in the e‐mails.

Findings

Structural equation modeling results support that interactional justice is an antecedent of fear of formal punishment that fully mediates the relationship between interactional justice and workplace internet deviance.

Research limitations/implications

The researched employees have job conditions inherent to the peculiarities of the public sector which may limit the ability to extrapolate the findings in the private sector. The fear construct was assessed by a self‐supplied scale, and thus the presence of shades of other similar emotions could not be discounted. Findings provide a more understandable mechanism of the influence of supervisor disrespect on cyberloafing.

Practical implications

These findings contribute to an understanding of the ways in which organizations can control cyberloafing and provide reservations about the intimidator strategy efficiency.

Originality/value

The use of fear of punishment as a mediator on this link is unprecedented.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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