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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Mark Amorosi, George Zornada, Todd Gibson, Joel Almquist and Pablo J. Man

To analyze the recent SEC no-action relief allowing a non-US investment company to invest as a feeder fund in a US registered open-end management investment company…

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze the recent SEC no-action relief allowing a non-US investment company to invest as a feeder fund in a US registered open-end management investment company without complying with all of the conditions of Section 12(d)(1)(E) of the Investment Company Act of 1940.

Design/methodology/approach

This article discusses the various conditions that a non-US investment company investing as a foreign feeder in a US registered open-end management investment company must satisfy in order to avoid complying with certain provisions of Section 12(d)(1)(E) of the Investment Company Act of 1940. In addition, the article analyzes certain potential tax and regulatory challenges facing firms seeking to rely on the relief.

Findings

This article concludes that the SEC no-action relief is an incremental step in reducing barriers to global distribution of US registered funds and may marginally increase the use of cross-border master-feeder arrangements as contemplated by the no-action letter. Nevertheless, this article cautions that significant impediments to global distribution of US registered funds remain, including tax withholding and non-US law issues.

Originality/value

This article contains valuable information about the regulatory impediments to global distribution of US registered funds, as well as learned assessments of the impact of recent developments in this space by experienced securities lawyers.

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Michael McGrath and Pablo J. Man

To explain that the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) brought and settled charges against an investment adviser to several alternative mutual funds alleging…

Abstract

Purpose

To explain that the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) brought and settled charges against an investment adviser to several alternative mutual funds alleging, among other charges, failure to comply with the custody requirements of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”).

Design/methodology/approach

To explain that the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) brought and settled charges against an investment adviser to several alternative mutual funds alleging, among other charges, failure to comply with the custody requirements of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”).

Findings

The enforcement action serves as an important reminder for the growing number of advisers of alternative mutual funds to be mindful of specific restrictions and obligations when managing registered funds that do not apply to private funds and separate accounts. This action shows that the SEC will bring charges even when the alleged violations do not result in harm to investors.

Practical implications

The 1940 Act, the rules thereunder, and SEC staff guidance relating to alternative investment strategies are complicated and not intuitive. These standards can constrain a registered fund’s ability to employ options, futures, swaps, prime brokerage, repurchase and reverse repurchase agreements, enhanced leverage through securities lending, and other facilities. As the SEC continues to examine alternative mutual funds, advisers to these funds should remain cognizant of the obligations arising under the 1940 Act and the implementation of fund policies and procedures.

Originality/value

Practical guidance from experienced financial services lawyers.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Desislava Ivanova Yordanova and Matilda Ivanova Alexandrova‐Boshnakova

The research objective of the study is to investigate the gender effects on risk propensity, risk perception, and risk behaviour of entrepreneurs distinguishing between…

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3093

Abstract

Purpose

The research objective of the study is to investigate the gender effects on risk propensity, risk perception, and risk behaviour of entrepreneurs distinguishing between direct and indirect gender effects. The study seeks to address the gap in the knowledge of the link between risk taking, risk propensity, and risk perception in the context of women and risk (Brindley).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on Sitkin and Pablo's model of risk behaviour and the literature on cognitive factors as determinants of risk perception, the paper provides hypotheses about the link between gender, risk perception, risk propensity, and risk behaviour. The proposed hypotheses are tested on a sample of 382 Bulgarian entrepreneurs.

Findings

Although female and male entrepreneurs have similar risk perceptions, female entrepreneurs are likely to have a lower risk propensity than male entrepreneurs. Risk propensity mediates completely the effect of gender on risk behaviour. The effect of gender on risk propensity is mediated partially by risk preference, outcome history, and age. Gender has an indirect effect on risk perception via overconfidence and risk propensity.

Research limitations/implications

The paper's ability to draw causal inferences is limited by the cross‐sectional nature of the study. The results may not be applicable to other countries and occupations.

Practical implications

The findings help to clarify the reasons for gender differences in risk behaviour and risk propensity of entrepreneurs and to design behavioural interventions.

Originality/value

This paper is an attempt to create a better understanding of the factors that account for gender differences in risk taking.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

May Aung and Martha L. Arias

The purpose of the paper is to propose and examine with evidence from Ecuador a behavioral framework that helps understand environmental practices in a small rural community.

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1708

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to propose and examine with evidence from Ecuador a behavioral framework that helps understand environmental practices in a small rural community.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is a multidisciplinary study that integrates ethnographic, feminist, and fourth generation approaches. Qualitative and quantitative methods were applied.

Findings

Findings indicate a number of relevant determinant factors (social norms, personal norms, intention to act), moderating factors (knowledge of the issues, awareness of the consequences, knowledge of the strategies and action skills, assumption of the responsibilities), and socio‐demographic factors (gender and social class) that influence solid waste (garbage) management behavior in a small rural community in the Ecuadorian Andes.

Practical implications

This study recommends general public training for the stakeholders of this community taking into account gender and social class differences. The importance of generating role models in groups such as business owners and teachers to lead in waste management behavior is also suggested.

Originality/value

This study develops a behavioral framework with supporting empirical evidence from Ecuador that aids the understanding of environmental management practices of women and men from a small cohesive community

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Teresa Jurado-Guerrero, Jordi M. Monferrer, Carmen Botía-Morillas and Francisco Abril

Most studies on work–life support at workplaces consider work–life balance to be a women’s issue, either explicitly or implicitly. This chapter analyses how fathers who…

Abstract

Most studies on work–life support at workplaces consider work–life balance to be a women’s issue, either explicitly or implicitly. This chapter analyses how fathers who are involved caregivers are supported or hindered in attaining work–life balance by their workplaces. It explores the following three questions: (1) why fathers value some job adaptations over others compared with mothers; (2) how organizational cultures influence the work–life balance of new fathers and (3) what differences exist across public and private sectors as well as large versus small companies. A qualitative approach with three discussion groups and 22 involved fathers enables us to explore these issues for large companies, public sector workplaces and small businesses. We find that tight time schedules, flextime, telework, schedule control and fully paid nontransferable leaves of absence constitute policies that favor involved fatherhood, while measures without wage replacement generate fear of penalization in the workplace and do not fit the persistent relevance of the provider role. In addition, un-similar supervisors, envy, lack of understanding and gender stereotypes among co-workers and clients constitute cultural barriers at the workplace level. Contrary to our expectations, small businesses may offer a better work–life balance than large companies, while the public sector is not always as family-friendly as assumed.

Details

Fathers, Childcare and Work: Cultures, Practices and Policies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-042-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Georgios I. Zekos

Globalisation is generally defined as the “denationalisation of clusters of political, economic, and social activities” that destabilize the ability of the sovereign State…

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1049

Abstract

Globalisation is generally defined as the “denationalisation of clusters of political, economic, and social activities” that destabilize the ability of the sovereign State to control activities on its territory, due to the rising need to find solutions for universal problems, like the pollution of the environment, on an international level. Globalisation is a complex, forceful legal and social process that take place within an integrated whole with out regard to geographical boundaries. Globalisation thus differs from international activities, which arise between and among States, and it differs from multinational activities that occur in more than one nation‐State. This does not mean that countries are not involved in the sociolegal dynamics that those transboundary process trigger. In a sense, the movements triggered by global processes promote greater economic interdependence among countries. Globalisation can be traced back to the depression preceding World War II and globalisation at that time included spreading of the capitalist economic system as a means of getting access to extended markets. The first step was to create sufficient export surplus to maintain full employment in the capitalist world and secondly establishing a globalized economy where the planet would be united in peace and wealth. The idea of interdependence among quite separate and distinct countries is a very important part of talks on globalisation and a significant side of today’s global political economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Niall Brennan

While horror film is hardly new to Latin America, film scholars have largely emphasized the paradigms of socially engaged, ‘serious cinema’ over exploring how genre, cult…

Abstract

While horror film is hardly new to Latin America, film scholars have largely emphasized the paradigms of socially engaged, ‘serious cinema’ over exploring how genre, cult or other transgressive film-making modes have developed in and reflect the region (Tierney, 2014). To characterize Latin American horror, it is typified by the supernatural, which indeed contradicts serious cinema. Since about 2010, however, Latin American film-makers have revisited the ‘abduction’ subgenre of horror film. This chapter analyses three such films – Scherzo Diabolico (García Bogliano, 2015), Luna de Miel (Cohen, 2015) and Sudor Frío (García Bogliano, 2010) – to suggest how their representations of gender and class complicate assumptions about everyday life in the region. The chapter also interrogates how this revived mode of horror film-making reconfigures gender ideologies to challenge the Latin American sociopolitical structures of machismo and patriarchy. By integrating conceptualizations of hybridity with transnational views on horror film-making and Freeland’s (1996) reworked feminist strategy for analysing horror texts, this chapter argues that, in tandem with new means of accessing and viewing Latin American horror globally, we should rethink how the abduction subgenre reflects new realities of Latin American society.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2019

Moisés Grimaldi Puyana, Pablo Gálvez-Ruiz, Antonio Jesús Sánchez-Oliver and Jerónimo García Fernández

The purpose of this paper is to understand the current relationship between factors such as desire and viability and entrepreneurial intention, using the Business Event…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the current relationship between factors such as desire and viability and entrepreneurial intention, using the Business Event Model as a point of analysis, as well as to understand the influence of gender as a moderating effect on entrepreneurial intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 278 students from the Faculty of Education Sciences (University of Seville) were invited to participate with students carrying out degrees in Physical Activity and Sport Sciences.

Findings

There is a positive and similar relationship between desire and viability due to gender-related reasons. In the same way, this study presents a positive relationship in men and women, between desire and viability, desire and entrepreneurial intention and viability and entrepreneurial intention.

Practical implications

The public policies of the university should be oriented to the promotion of the desire perceived in women, carrying out sessions or training courses, where the speakers could be women leaders of companies. In addition, public policies should promote the perceived viability of men through training by providing technical resources on the operation of a company.

Social implications

This study provides theoretical knowledge on the entrepreneurial intentions of students at the University of Seville and therefore may help to improve policies aimed at promoting entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

This study provides clear practical implications for the management of students, and the findings facilitate the improvement of university policies designed to promote entrepreneurship in this type of student.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Pablo Arocena and Imanol Nuñez

– The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of depression affecting work (DAW) performance and estimates gender differences across occupations.

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1864

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of depression affecting work (DAW) performance and estimates gender differences across occupations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Labor Force Survey data from the UK in 2007, the authors first decompose the differential on the aggregate incidence rate of DAW between men and women into two components: the gender effect and the occupational effect. Then, the authors identify the stressors of DAW by means of a logit regression analysis.

Findings

The empirical results show that gender is not a significant explanatory variable of DAW. Further, when differences are analyzed for each gender separately, results show that the effect of occupations is stronger within females than within males.

Originality/value

Most of previous studies focus on occupational causes of depression. By contrast, this paper investigates the effect of depression on work performance.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2015

Janne Tienari, Rebecca Lund and Alexei Koveshnikov

Our review shows that M&A research fails to discuss questions of gender. In this chapter, we aim to understand this lack of sensitivity to gender in analyzing how M&A…

Abstract

Our review shows that M&A research fails to discuss questions of gender. In this chapter, we aim to understand this lack of sensitivity to gender in analyzing how M&A processes unfold. We discuss strategic and people-oriented M&A research, seek to explain why gender and gender relations are not debated therein, and offer some ideas on how they could be incorporated in the analyses. We also consider the contemporary system of academic publishing for understanding the marginal position of gender research in general. Overall, the chapter paves the way for arguing why the gender perspective would benefit M&A research so that it would become better equipped to address the focal phenomenon as constituted in its social, cultural, and economic context.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-090-6

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