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Article

Fadhli Zul Fauzi and Bevaola Kusumasari

This paper aims to compare the implementation of public–private partnership (PPP) in Western and non-Western countries by analyzing several predetermined aspects such as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare the implementation of public–private partnership (PPP) in Western and non-Western countries by analyzing several predetermined aspects such as government and political system, PPP’s model of agreement, political commitment and the role of PPP supporting unit.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses comparative case studies to compare the implementation of PPP in seven Western and non-Western countries by using various appropriate data such as frequently used agreements, government systems, political commitments and PPP-supporting units to understand the extent of differences in the success of PPP implementation found in each country.

Findings

The results reveal that the implementation of PPPs in Western and non-Western countries do not significantly differ, except for in the instance of political commitments. Political interventions in PPP implementation still frequently occurred in non-Western countries, which consequently disrupted the implementation of PPP itself.

Originality/value

Previous comparison of PPP studies only focused on the implementation of PPP without analyzing the political context in each country. One of the contributions that this paper will bring to the conversations around PPP is that the implementation of PPP will be analyzed with regard to political contexts.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Book part

Boštjan Ferk and Petra Ferk

The purpose of this chapter is to analyse Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) in the developing and emerging economies as a multifaceted challenge from viewpoint of the 10…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to analyse Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) in the developing and emerging economies as a multifaceted challenge from viewpoint of the 10 keys ‘for’ and ‘against’ PPPs: feasibility; planning; optimization; modernization and development; financing; project delivery; project operation; supervision; user satisfaction and accounting issues. The conceptual model and the reasons were formulated by the authors some 10 years ago, based on the literature and case-study reviews. Relevance of those reasons was verified in practice. The knowledge and critical perspective on the above-stated reasons are relevant for the implementation of PPP projects in any national economy – developed, emerging or developing, but it is quintessential for the implementation of PPPs in the economies that are at the early stage of implementation of PPPs. Although for the identification of the above-stated reasons, wide comparative literature and case-studies review was conducted, the reasons were verified in practice in Slovenia only. Slovenia is considered as one of the most advanced transition countries of Central Europe and a developed economy. This chapter can improve public policy, teaching, learning and practice of PPP implementation in developing and emerging economies. The value of this chapter is in the approach which goes beyond the usual defending or renouncing of PPPs. This chapter also clearly identifies the importance of a sincere motive for the implementation of PPPs by the government as a prerequisite for the successful implementation of PPPs.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Public–Private Partnerships in Developing and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-494-1

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Article

Suhaiza Ismail

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it aims to investigate the factors forcing the implementation of public private partnerships (PPP) in Malaysia. Second, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it aims to investigate the factors forcing the implementation of public private partnerships (PPP) in Malaysia. Second, the study intends to compare the driving forces for PPP implementation in Malaysia to the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a questionnaire survey, 122 responses were received from respondents in Malaysia and the responses were analysed using descriptive analysis, which included the mean and mean score ranking. In comparing to the driving factors in the UK, evidence from prior studies that adopted a similar questionnaire instrument was obtained and analysed.

Findings

The results show that the top three driving forces for PPP implementation in Malaysia are “economic development pressure of demanding more facilities”, “private incentive” and “shortage of government funding”. Although comparison of the results between the two countries found that both countries regarded all the factors, to some extent, as important, different countries have a different priority for each of the driving forces. The findings imply that the unique nature of PPP in different countries is reflected in the different motivation factors of each country to implement PPP.

Originality/value

The present study not only offers insights on the key driving forces for PPP implementation in Malaysia but also useful information on the comparison of motivation factors to the pioneer of PPP implementation (i.e. the UK).

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article

Susann Stritzke

The purpose of this paper is to review critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of the Scaling Solar Programme in Zambia, the first solar public-private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review critical success factors (CSFs) for the implementation of the Scaling Solar Programme in Zambia, the first solar public-private partnership (PPP) in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

The single case study is based on stakeholder interviews and the evaluation of primary and secondary sources of data. As a first step, the study illustrates the implementation of Scaling Solar in Zambia and links it to the formal PPP framework of the country. The second step compares central CSFs for PPPs identified by previous research with the current framework of the programme. Furthermore, it analyses whether these CSFs have affected the PPP project implementation in Zambia. Based on these findings the question discussed will be which CSFs can be identified that impacted the implementation of the programme in a third step.

Findings

The case study found that the design of the Scaling Solar Programme largely mitigated the main financial and political risks identified in previous studies with regard to the uptake of energy infrastructure processes in developing countries. It reveals that government stakeholder alignment and institutional capacity are the central CSFs which impact the roll-out of the programme in Zambia.

Originality/value

The study suggests that a pre-implementation phase of a complex PPP project should comprise government stakeholder alignment which can be based on approaches to Relationship Management Theory. By suggesting a stakeholder management approach, the study indicates how a PPP framework, with a redefined role of a horizontally integrated, independent Public-Private Partnership Unit, can support this approach.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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Book part

Valentina N. Parakhina, Galina V. Vorontsova, Oksana N. Momotova, Olga A. Boris and Rustam M. Ustaev

This chapter studies the importance of implementation of innovational projects of technological growth through public–private partnership (PPP). The authors determine the…

Abstract

This chapter studies the importance of implementation of innovational projects of technological growth through public–private partnership (PPP). The authors determine the probability of implementing a project of PPP depending on distribution of risks between its participants. Usage of the mechanism of PPP allows optimizing possible risks during implementation of innovational activities, attracting large business for creation and implementation of new technologies, and forming sustainable ties between R&D departments and business structures. The types of risks in the projects of PPP are given, as well as tendencies of their emergence depending on the stage of implementation of the innovational project, including the following: formation of policy on development of PPP; preparatory, implementary, commercialization of the results of joint activities; and monitoring and control over execution of the project. The algorithm of the system of risk management in innovational projects of technological growth on the platform of PPP is presented. The methods of overcoming the risks that appear during implementation of an innovational project of technological growth within PPP are given. A special attention should be paid to the fourth (distribution of risks) and fifth (reduction of risks) stages. During implementation of innovational projects with application of a business model of PPP, the risks are dealt with by the participant who can manage them better. Reduction of risks is achieved better if several strategies are used – for decreasing the influence of the risk on the innovational project (strategies of risk evasion, acceptance of the risk situation, compensation, transfer, and reduction).

Details

Tech, Smart Cities, and Regional Development in Contemporary Russia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-881-0

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Article

Robert Osei-Kyei and Albert P.C. Chan

This paper aims to empirically investigate the differences and similarities on the implementation constraints in public–private partnership (PPP) in developing and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically investigate the differences and similarities on the implementation constraints in public–private partnership (PPP) in developing and developed economies/countries, represented by Ghana and Hong Kong, respectively.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted with relevant experienced PPP practitioners in Ghana and Hong Kong. One hundred and three completed questionnaires were received for analysis. Kendall’s coefficient of concordance analysis, mean score ranking, Mann–Whitney U test and quartile grouping were used for data analysis.

Findings

The results show six implementation constraints with significant differences. Constraints related to the general investment climate of PPP projects (i.e. ecological conditions of PPP) are ranked higher in Ghana than in Hong Kong, whereas constraints related to the organisation and negotiations of PPP projects are higher in Hong Kong than in Ghana. Further, two constraints, lengthy delay in finalising negotiations and lengthy delay due to political debate, are very critical in both jurisdictions, whereas “negative public perceptions on PPP transactions” and “high use of unsolicited proposals” are of less challenge in the implementation of PPP in both jurisdictions.

Originality/value

The findings of this study contribute to knowledge on the international best practices of PPP. In addition, international private bidders would be informed of the mitigation measures to adopt when engaging in PPP arrangements in any part of the world, whether in a developing or developed economy country.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article

Miliete Negash Gebremeskel, Soo Yong Kim, Le Dinh Thuc and Minh V. Nguyen

The purpose of this study is to identify driving factors and a quantitative model for implementing public-private partnership (PPP) projects in Ethiopia as a case study in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify driving factors and a quantitative model for implementing public-private partnership (PPP) projects in Ethiopia as a case study in emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature and semi-structured interviews were carried out to identify driving factors affecting the implementation of PPP projects in the Ethiopian context. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey within three months, with 59 validated responses; mean score technique and factor analysis were conducted. The fuzzy synthetic evaluation (FSE) method was applied to develop a driving index (DI) for implementing infrastructure PPP projects. Finally, a comparative analysis of top-five drivers was conducted between four emerging economies.

Findings

Mean values show that all driving variables are important. Through factor analysis, 22 identified driving variables were grouped into six factors, namely, benefit for public and private sectors, attention of private sector, social development, cost reduction, management ability of public sector and ability of private sector. The FSE method constructs a DI and shows that benefit for public and private sectors is the most crucial factor for PPP implementation in the context of Ethiopia. Apart from this, most driving forces for adopting PPP projects in these countries related to financial problems.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first integrate driving factors for PPP implementation. The index provides the decision-makers with a comprehensive tool to assess the needs of PPP implementation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Thomas Kankam Adjei, David Mensah Sackey, David John Edwards and Reza M. Hosseini

This paper is anchored in a premise of a universal call to action by all UN member states in 2015 to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is anchored in a premise of a universal call to action by all UN member states in 2015 to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity by 2030 within the blueprint of the sustainable development goals (SDGS). The purpose of this study is to mainstream the SDGs in Ghana’s energy sector within the framework of public–private partnerships (PPP): challenges, opportunities and strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review was carried out to explore concepts, theories and frameworks for initiating PPP. Best local and international practices in the implementation of PPP projects; challenges and opportunities in the implementation of PPP projects, strategies for mainstreaming the SDGs in Ghana’s energy sector and assess business action in the implementation of the SDGs in Ghana’s energy sector. The study is situated within the social constructionist philosophical tradition. The qualitative research strategy was adopted as the main methodological choice. Interview guides were used to collect data from respondents in the Accra metropolis.

Findings

Lack of a PPP policy law in Ghana, conflict of interest in PPP projects, excessive government control over projects, cumbersome licensing and legal regime and economic stability were the most significant challenges identified to PPPs. Technology transfer, efficiency gains and mobilization of additional resources for development on the government side where the opportunities for the private sector. Awareness creation, modeling inclusive business with corporate social responsibility (CSR) and SDGs, exploring business opportunities in SDGs such as carbon trading, aligning national policies with SDGs, establishing sustainability units and partnerships with relevant bodies were proposed for mainstreaming the SDGs in Ghana’s energy sector.

Research limitations/implications

It was established from this study that indeed PPPs have a major role to play in unleashing all available forces and prospects toward achieving the SDGs. This paper is constrained to the energy industry in Ghana. It provides a theory-based direction on how companies in the energy sector can contribute to social and economic interventions through a framework of PPP framework within the SGDs. Future research may explore how companies in other sectors may contribute to the sustainability discourse.

Practical implications

This will ultimately lead to additional funding to support government efforts in the implementation of SDGs, honing of sustainable (inclusive) business models, creating an enabling environment for PPPs toward inclusive growth and national development leaving no one behind. It recommended that there should be a national policy and law on PPPs and the private sector should be incentivized to engage government in PPPs implementation for the SDGs. Theoretically, this study contributes to the policy analysis discourse and scaling-up literature on the SDGs.

Originality/value

This study explores the challenges associated with mainstreaming the SGDs in the energy sector from a public–private business perspective. It also offers a new policy, economic and legal regulatory framework that contributes to emerging trends. The outcome of the analyzes advocates for clear business strategies for implementation of the SDG apart from CSR.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article

Mhamed Biygautane, Stewart Clegg and Khalid Al-Yahya

Existing public–private partnership (PPP) literature that explicitly adopts neo-institutional theory, tends to elucidate the impact of isomorphic pressures and…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing public–private partnership (PPP) literature that explicitly adopts neo-institutional theory, tends to elucidate the impact of isomorphic pressures and organizational fields and structuration on PPP projects. This paper advances this literature by presenting the institutional work and micro-level dynamics through which actors initiate and implement a new form of project delivery. The authors show how actors enact responses to institutional structuration in the expansion and transformation of an airport from a public entity into a PPP in Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a single case study design that offers an empirically rich and thick description of events such as the dynamic processes, practices and types of institutional work carried out by actors and organizations to deliver the project under investigation.

Findings

Religious symbolic work as social integration triggered system integration work, which expanded the power capabilities of individual actors leading the project. Repair work then followed to alleviate the negative effects of disempowering the agency of actors negatively affected by the PPP model and to streamline the project implementation process.

Practical implications

This research offers several practical implications. For PPPs to operate successfully in contexts similar to the Gulf region, policymakers should provide strong political support and be willing to bear a considerable risk of losses or minimal outcomes during the early phases of experimentation with PPPs. Also, policymakers should not only focus their attention on technical requirements of PPPs but also associate new meanings with the normative and cultural-cognitive elements that are integral to the success of PPP implementation. In order to design strategies for change that are designed to fit the unique cultural and sociopolitical settings of each country, policymakers should empower capable individual actors and provide them with resources and access to power, which will enable them to enforce changes that diverge from institutionalized practices.

Social implications

This research connected the PPP literature with theoretical frameworks drawn from neo-institutional theory and power. It would be valuable for further research, however, to connect ideas from the PPP literature with other disciplines such as psychology and social entrepreneurship. PPP research examines a recent phenomenon that can potentially be combined with non-traditional streams of research in analyzing projects. Expanding the realm of PPP research beyond traditional theoretical boundaries could potentially yield exciting insights into how the overall institutional and psychological environments surrounding projects affect their initiation and implementation.

Originality/value

The paper contributes new insights regarding the roles of religious symbolic work, allied with social and system integration of power relations in implementing PPP projects. It suggests a theoretical shift from structures and organizational fields – macro- and meso-levels of analysis – to individuals – micro-level – as triggers of new forms of project delivery that break with the status quo.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article

Robert Osei-Kyei and Albert P.C. Chan

The public sector plays a critical role in the successful implementation of public–private partnership (PPP) projects. Thus, there is a need to holistically explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

The public sector plays a critical role in the successful implementation of public–private partnership (PPP) projects. Thus, there is a need to holistically explore the public sector’s view on the implementation practices of PPP. This paper aims to explore and compare the public sector’s views on PPP practices in Ghana and Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with PPP practitioners of senior authority in public institutions in both Ghana and Hong Kong. The interviews covered critical issues of PPP implementation practices such as motivations for engaging in PPP, success criteria/indicators, critical success factors (CSFs), external stakeholder management and training and education in PPPs.

Findings

The findings show that quick delivery of public projects and private sector efficiency are the reasons considered by both groups of interviewees. On the success criteria, interviewees from both jurisdictions mentioned user satisfaction, budget, time and quality. The CSFs mentioned by both groups include capacity building and training, project viability, proper planning and good feasibility studies. Sensitization programs, including open forums and community meetings, were mentioned by both groups as measures for managing external stakeholders. On the training and education, both groups mentioned international study tours and organizing courses and seminars.

Originality/value

The outputs of this study offer strategies that are very useful to international private developers who are interested in PPP practices in Africa and Asia. Further, the findings contribute to the knowledge on the international best practices for PPP.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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