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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Shraddha Mishra, Surya Prakash Singh, John Johansen, Yang Cheng and Sami Farooq

The purpose of this paper is to find the driving factors for effective and efficient management of international manufacturing network (IMN) which has become increasingly…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find the driving factors for effective and efficient management of international manufacturing network (IMN) which has become increasingly important due to the intensive competition existing in the manufacturing industry. This paper presents a magnified view of different constructs of IMN and identifies the qualitative factors which are broadly classified under different constructs like political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental.

Design/methodology/approach

Principal component analysis is applied to club identified factors into political, economic, social, technological and legal categories. PESTLESWOT approach is used to shortlist the identified factors using the elimination algorithm. Using analytical hierarchy process, weightages and rank of the identified factors are evaluated. Interpretive structural modeling is applied to understand inter-relationship among factors, and to analyze the driving power and dependence of the factors.

Findings

The results obtained from the above approaches are compared to identify most significant factors and the list of IMN enablers is presented using Venn Diagram. Government stability, Economic freedom, economic stability, environmental sustainability and raw material availability are coming out to be the driving factors across all techniques. Finally, the paper provides weights of the driving indicators common across all multi-criteria decision-making techniques considered.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed work provides significant information about the qualitative factors needed to be considered while designing and developing IMN. As identified by literature review and through expert opinions, not all 29 factors responsible for IMN development are crucial. Many factors are either interdependent or driven by others. The paper provides a useful analysis about the driving factors that need to be taken into account.

Originality/value

The study presents a comprehensive analysis of the IMN enablers. Furthermore, it provides managerial and theoretical implications to deal with the complexities encountered while establishing IMN.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Praveer Sinha, Ravi Shankar, Prem Vrat and Shweta Mathur

Distribution and retail supply of electricity is the most important cog in the power sector value chain. Despite several reforms, most of the Discoms are facing huge…

Abstract

Purpose

Distribution and retail supply of electricity is the most important cog in the power sector value chain. Despite several reforms, most of the Discoms are facing huge financial losses and resorting to a tariff hike which may not be a viable solution. The purpose of this paper is to analyze a case study of Tata Power Delhi Distribution Ltd (Tata Power-DDL) which inoculated itself against the financial ills, and demonstrates how a utility can nurture itself and manage the key stakeholder expectation with innovation, ethics, safety, transparency and agility being its cornerstone.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyses the situation for Tata Power-DDL which needs to realign its strategy to meet emerging sustainability challenges. The case covers the aspect of strategic management, strategy formulation and change management system deployment using tools such as strength, weakness, opportunities, threat (SWOT), political economical social technological legal environment (PESTLE), critical success factor and key performance indicator cascade. It touches upon the emerging need for distribution utilities to look beyond economic signals and take social and environmental impacts into the strategy planning process.

Findings

It viewed the distribution business beyond its conventional responsibility of making power available to consumers and to provide quality service. A well thought out adaption and adoption of upgraded technology can be a game changer even for a market which is highly regulated and dominated by players in their respective defined territories.

Research limitations/implications

Since the sector is regulated and each utility has a pre-defined set of area of operation with no competition within its licensed area, hence, there is a limited application of applied strategy tools such as SWOT and PESTLE.

Practical implications

Since the sector is regulated and each utility has a pre-defined set of area of operation with no competition within its licensed area, hence, there is a limited application of applied strategy tools such as SWOT and PESTLE.

Originality/value

India as a market is evolving in energy space and utilities are still struggling to have a fundamental structure to meet the agenda of “power to all.” The paper provides the valuable insights into the process of environmental scanning and formulation of organizational strategy to meet the needs of existing and future energy markets.

Case study
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Sathyanarayanan Ramachandran

The case could be effectively used in courses on entrepreneurship, strategy and brand management in MBA programs and executive-level training programs.

Abstract

Study level/applicability

The case could be effectively used in courses on entrepreneurship, strategy and brand management in MBA programs and executive-level training programs.

Subject area

Entrepreneurship, strategy, marketing, women leadership and women in business.

Case overview

This case deals with the business decision-making situation of Ms Jyotsna Ramachandran, a first-generation woman entrepreneur from Southern India, who has created a Global collaborative business network in self-publishing of books from India. After gaining industry experience for five years in some of the leading retail brands of India, she decided to take a plunge in entrepreneurship. She tried several businesses ranging from retail staffing to custom-made chocolates. Though it was profitable, the volumes and margins were smaller, and Jyotsna aspired big. As, at that time she was on her family way, she decided to identify a profitable business with better value creation and premium for the consumers and at the same time free from minute-by-minute concentration to take care of her child. In other words, a less-hassle home-based business with better revenue streams and margins. The case gives a thorough background of her rise in the industry and talks about some of her new ideas and plans.

Expected learning outcomes

Students will be in a position to: 1. Understand gender issues and bias affecting women in work. 2. Illustrate the initial phases of entrepreneurship. 3. Understand and apply the evaluation tools like PESTLE, SWOT and then business model canvas. 4. Understand the value chain and the intensive and integrative growth strategies. 5. Illustrate blue oceans in an industry setup – irrespective of the industry growth rate. 6. Apply perspectives on brand management.

Supplementary materials

Detailed teaching notes attached. Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Social implications

The case addresses the important gender issues affecting women’s work–life balance. It will also inspire many women through the success of the woman protagonist and her project head well documented in this case study.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

The Case For Women, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2732-4443

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2014

Patricia Dearnaley

Changes in the UK social care sector over the past 20 years have effected a fundamental shift in commissioning and delivery relationships. This “quasi-market” challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

Changes in the UK social care sector over the past 20 years have effected a fundamental shift in commissioning and delivery relationships. This “quasi-market” challenges existing theory and models around competitive advantage. This study, as outlined in two earlier articles, addressed weaknesses in the defining framework for analysis and business planning in this new environment; the purpose of this concluding paper is to propose a new perspective for those interested in entering this market.

Design/methodology/approach

The original research comprised a constructive research approach through a single holistic case study, using qualitative research methods including document analysis, interviews, secondary data, observations and facilitated meetings.

Findings

This final paper offers a structured framework of analysis and response: the External Drivers Model.

Research limitations/implications

The model was developed for a scenario impacting upon a social housing agency, with ambitions to enter this market as a new provider; it may require further research to establish its generalisability to other organisations and other sectors.

Originality/value

This series of three papers adds to existing knowledge by critiquing current business models, and positing a potential development to existing contingency theory: the External Drivers Model. The study has resulted in a number of outputs including an outline of tools to assist in using the model.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2021

Richard Thomson, Katherine Hofmeyr and Amanda Bowen

At midnight on Thursday, 26 March 2020, the South African government ordered a three-week lockdown in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequently extended this…

Abstract

Case overview

At midnight on Thursday, 26 March 2020, the South African government ordered a three-week lockdown in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequently extended this lockdown for a further two weeks until the end of April 2020. Among other measures, businesses not classed as “essential” had to cease operation. This meant that Jonathan Robinson, founder of the Bean There Coffee Company had to close his trendy Cape Town and Milpark coffee shops, as well as the company’s hospitality and corporate business. At the same time, Bean There’s costs increased by 25%, as the rand: dollar exchange rate worsened substantially. A glimmer of hope was that the company was able to continue roasting coffee and supplying its retail clients. Unlike most captains of industry, Robinson was not driven by the bottom line and clamouring shareholders. His corporate strategy was driven by a single, simple purpose: to achieve ethical sustainability aspirations while still running a profitable business. The question for him now, however, was how to ensure that his company could survive in the short term, so that it could achieve these goals in the longer term, and whether he could take this opportunity to think about whether his business was best positioned to achieve these goals when things returned to normal.

Expected learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: conduct a thorough analysis of a specific company and its industry, including its markets, competitors, and other aspects of the internal and external business environment, using a range of tools, including a Business Model Canvas (BMC), SWOT analysis and PESTLE analysis; analyse and explain the market outlook of a company; identify and analyse a company’s competitors; discuss and explain a detailed implementation plan showing the way forward for a company, considering its current challenges, including integrating a range of conceptual and analytical fields of knowledge to assess a management dilemma, and arrive at a creative and innovative management solution; and be able to present information and defend substantial insights and solutions to a management dilemma in oral and written modes, appropriate in standard for both the academic and business communities to analyse and appreciate.

Complexity academic level

Postgraduate Diploma in Management, MBA, Masters in Management, Executive Education.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Sustainability Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-244-7

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Warren Pike and T.C. Melewar

Independent French wine producers are faced with excessive costs and a declining image of quality compared with their New World competitors. A confusing offer and weak…

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Abstract

Purpose

Independent French wine producers are faced with excessive costs and a declining image of quality compared with their New World competitors. A confusing offer and weak brand identities also make their often poorly marketed products less attractive at the point of sale. As production continues to surge, plummeting prices have left many of these producers economically unviable. Is it possible for these small independent producers to survive in an ever more competitive global market? This paper attempts to answer this question, by studying the challenges confronting this group, as well as their advantages, both in their home and on a global market.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature in French and English was reviewed in highlighting key issues impinging the industry. A small survey was conducted to ascertain the drinking habits of young adults market in France. Also SWOT, PESTLE, and Porter’s Five Forces were used in presenting a more strructured approach in discussing the nature of and challenges facing this industry.

Findings

It is evident that a lot of work needs to be done for French wines to regain their global competitiveness, and even more so for small producers who do not benefit from the massive promotional budgets of their larger competitors. However, by ensuring a superior level of quality, higher production costs can be justified, while still being carefully managed to ensure that all additional costs incurred add value to the end product. This quality needs to be guaranteed by a stronger and clearer AOC system that is regularly evaluated to maintain its credibility, and reinforced by a strong individual brand image, in order to gain consumer confidence. A cultural change is also necessary, away from defence and towards a more proactive approach. The innovation for which French winemakers were once famous must be reclaimed.

Research limitations/implications

It would be interesting to further study the cultural metamorphosis that has taken place amongst French winemakers over the course of the last century. The comparative bargaining power of small producers against large supermarket chains is also a topic that could be further explored. Given that it will not be possible for all producers to become a key reference and guarantee shelf space amongst their highly marketed competitors, greater research into more innovative ways of getting products to market would be extremely useful.

Practical implications

Foreign markets should be highly studied and understood before entry. Integrating products into local culture is often more successful than imposing the product as part of the culture of the producing country. Most importantly, however, producers should be prepared to adapt to a changing market and to invest in order to secure future capital inflows. The rise of new global players, such as China, will only intensify competition, and today’s less sophisticated consumers are more likely to be swayed by low prices and strong brands than by an overpriced and poorly positioned product from “Old Europe”.

Originality/value

A fairly thorough account of the current state of affairs of the wine industry in France has been presented and both the French literature and relevant web sites in French have been reviewed in highlighting and evaluating issues impinging the wine industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Muhammad Fareed and Sadaf Taimoor

Learn the application of important strategy frameworks such as PESTLE, SWOT and Porter’s five forces. Understand the theoretical underpinnings of services marketing and…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Learn the application of important strategy frameworks such as PESTLE, SWOT and Porter’s five forces. Understand the theoretical underpinnings of services marketing and learn the art of developing service blueprints. Critically evaluate the use of change management strategies to induce behavioral change among employees. Appreciate the balance that social enterprises need to achieve between their commercial and social impact goals. Critically evaluate the decision of outsourcing core competencies.

Case overview/synopsis

In 2019, Abbas Jaffery and Sumair Saleem, founders of Washup, Pakistan, a young venture providing on-demand, high-quality and cost-effective laundry service faced a critical management dilemma as their supply chain collapsed due to a rampant surge in demand. The demand surge had been the outcome of Washup’s effort to push its services to the customers by getting vetted by a social media influencer. However, the duo was caught off guard when their supply chain could not meet the sudden increase in demand. The hesitant behavior of the informal workers to join hands with Washup had not only cost Washup this management nightmare but even left the duo at wits ends to develop a strategy that would help gain business idea acceptance from the grass root workers to whom the core competencies of washing and ironing were being outsourced. This case is a rich description of the nuances of operating an unconventional social enterprise in an emerging market and gives an insight on how behavioral change among key workers is critical in ensuring the success of ventures.

Complexity academic level

This case is geared toward undergraduate students enrolled in courses of entrepreneurship, strategy and services marketing.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Po-Hsing Tseng and Nick Pilcher

Much literature considers future impacts of the Kra Canal on shipping times and on individual countries. In this paper, the authors consider the maritime business…

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Abstract

Purpose

Much literature considers future impacts of the Kra Canal on shipping times and on individual countries. In this paper, the authors consider the maritime business potential of the Kra Canal for companies, ports and countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a combination of a review of the extant literature, quantitative data from relevant calculations and qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with experts (n = 20) from four countries in the region, this paper contextualises the business potential of the Kra Canal through a PESTELE (political, economic, social, technological, environmental, legal and ethical) analysis before outlining a more targeted SWOT (strengths weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis to consider the potential for maritime business.

Findings

The PESTELE analysis reveals that there are a number of challenges related to the construction and possibility of the Kra Canal being built such as its impact on the political balance within the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. The SWOT analysis shows that the potential of the Kra Canal for maritime business is significant, and that the strengths and opportunities of increased route possibilities and reduced sailing times outweigh any weaknesses and threats.

Originality/value

Most studies into the Kra Canal focus on highly specific research targets or provide a particular perspective (e.g. historical). This paper, by drawing on two commonly used analytical frameworks, considers the canal for the first time from a wider context perspective as well as a specifically business one. Recommendations are made for policy makers and maritime businesses on the basis of the results.

Details

Maritime Business Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Roberto Moro Visconti, Anna Doś and Asli Pelin Gurgun

The aim of the chapter is to compare Public–Private Partnership (PPP) healthcare investments in developed countries with those in emerging economies, analysing the…

Abstract

The aim of the chapter is to compare Public–Private Partnership (PPP) healthcare investments in developed countries with those in emerging economies, analysing the sustainability issues of health-led growth. Healthcare PPP best practices in developed nations represent a template that catching-up economies may follow with local adaptations. A comparison starts from the UK case and then examines the Turkish experience as an ideal bridge between advanced and developing countries. Healthcare investments are a primary social infrastructure, with a deep impact on poverty alleviation. Demand for the infrastructure necessary to provide healthcare services has increased substantially in developing and emerging economies due to rapid economic growth, industrialization and urbanization, while public supply is limited by budget constraints. PPP best practices provide a global benchmark (World bank, 2015b). Integrated supply and value chains and management of viability milestone improve healthcare PPP sustainability and bankability. Different legal frameworks and funding issues are not thoroughly investigated. Careful customization and local fine-tuning of best practices require further scrutiny. Homogenization of best practices improves comparison of different projects, fostering competition and easing cross-border investments, accompanied by knowledge transfer, sharing and consequent value co-creation. Best practices improve value for money, bankability and resilience of PPP investments, with potential benefits for healthcare services and quality of life. This chapter makes an innovative and comprehensive comparison of healthcare PPP projects worldwide, looking for a common denominator of value-enhancing rules and resilient pro-growth strategies.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Public–Private Partnerships in Developing and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-494-1

Keywords

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