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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Roland K. Yeo

The paper seeks to examine problem‐based learning (PBL) as an emerging learning paradigm and proposes that it is a viable approach in leadership development. It aims to

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine problem‐based learning (PBL) as an emerging learning paradigm and proposes that it is a viable approach in leadership development. It aims to identify several key factors, strategies and possible outcomes associated with this new approach to training.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the literature on PBL, organizational learning and leadership training as well as practical experience, the paper discusses the salient features of PBL and their impact on leadership development through multiple levels of simultaneous learning.

Findings

Three important factors have been identified as contributing to the meaningfulness of leaders' learning process: problem definition, open communication and utilization of resources. Expert guidance after the formal PBL training phase provides the sensemaking pathway in shaping the learning‐oriented behavior of leaders.

Practical implications

A matrix eliciting a guided approach to PBL in leadership development is presented to make explicit the subtle complexity of the learning process. Through both a structured training to an unstructured operational phase, PBL has led leaders to the discovery of new roles, attitudes and knowledge required to meet current changing times.

Originality/value

The structured yet diverse learning framework of PBL provides a unique dimension to human resource development. When applied to a dynamic organizational context, PBL provides an integrative mix of learning opportunities and harmonizes potential learning disturbances to develop the real leader. This is an area that has not been extensively researched.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Roland K. Yeo

The paper aims to explore the role of problem‐based learning (PBL) in workplace settings. It seeks to discuss the principles of PBL in relation to individual and group

1052

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the role of problem‐based learning (PBL) in workplace settings. It seeks to discuss the principles of PBL in relation to individual and group learning, and to propose possible applications that can be incorporated into the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in Singapore through two sample groups: ten PBL specialists who had direct experience in workplace applications and 50 working professionals who had some direct or indirect experience in PBL. Convergent interviewing and open‐ended survey questions in addition to follow‐up face‐to‐face interviews were used respectively.

Findings

PBL can help employees to approach daily problems more confidently. Lessons drawn from problem‐solving activities can enhance the learning capacity of employees through dialogue and reflective inquiry. PBL activities can also help systematize learning patterns that are otherwise developed haphazardly through informal learning.

Research limitations/implications

PBL creates different learning networks by allowing greater learning loops to develop. The desired outcome is the generation of critical organizational knowledge necessary for competition and growth. PBL taps into intra‐organizational processes where a deeper relationship between its applications and workplace learning can be further explored.

Practical implications

The successful implementation of PBL in workplace settings requires a realistic timeframe, an appropriate reward and recognition system, a strategic positioning of technological infrastructure and an effective communication channel. Managers need to first appreciate the intrinsic value of PBL by supporting learning networks through the adjustment of organizational structures and processes.

Originality/value

PBL is more than a useful approach used in educational settings. PBL principles can be strategically applied to workplace environments to promote different learning types. Transfer of individual to team learning can best be achieved through the structured yet spontaneous PBL activities.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Karoline Trepper, Alison Boardman and Antero Garcia

This paper aims to explore teachers’ shifts in pedagogy and practice as they implemented a project-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching English Language Arts (ELA…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore teachers’ shifts in pedagogy and practice as they implemented a project-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching English Language Arts (ELA) for the first time.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed 10 ninth-grade ELA teachers in three schools after their first year enacting PBL. Initial codes were developed deductively from the interview questions and others emerged from the data. The authors also used memos to contextualize the interviews and triangulate findings.

Findings

Teachers described embracing new, expansive approaches to teaching ELA as they shifted from focusing on skills to big questions, and from literary analysis to “real-world” writing and assessment. These data illuminated three tensions around “traditional” versus PBL approaches to ELA: What counts as ELA? What counts as student success? And is PBL for everyone?

Originality/value

Few studies have explored teacher perceptions of PBL in secondary ELA classrooms. This paper uniquely illuminates some pathways for addressing the tension between “traditional” and PBL approaches. The authors call for deliberate, ongoing and gradualistic approaches to engaging in PBL routines that support educators to make meaningful shifts in instruction.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 July 2022

Houbin Fang, Lili Wang and Qi Zhou

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of one online PD in PBL. Researchers want to investigate if a five-day international online PBL training will…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of one online PD in PBL. Researchers want to investigate if a five-day international online PBL training will prepare teachers to implement PBL in their classrooms. Secondly, the researchers aim to determine if the training provides teachers with sufficient knowledge and support to ensure successful PBL implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were given a 5-day (20 h) online PBL training created by one of the researchers with three frontline teachers. Seven trainers are divided into four groups for four groups of participants. Group A included Grade 1 and Grade 2 teachers, Group B included Grade 3 and Grade 4 teachers, Group C included Grade 5 and Grade 6 teachers, and Group D consisted of Grades 7 through 9 teachers. All the participants were given exactly the same surveys at the beginning and the end of the training.

Findings

Consistent with previous studies comparing in person and virtue PD programs, this five-day interactive PD program was effective in increasing teachers' knowledge of and ability to plan and implement PBL projects. Specifically, results showed that teachers' knowledge level of PBL shifted from a shallow understanding of what the name implies to a deeper, more comprehensive, and more concrete understanding of PBL essential concepts, its pedagogical values, specific process involved in a PBL project. In addition, the PD program increased teachers' comfort level and ability of planning and implementing PBL projects across grade levels and subject areas.

Originality/value

This research study supported the previous study results that virtual PD programs can be as effective as in person programs. Further, this is the study discovered the effectiveness of PBL training between the US and China through online format, which has not been conducted literately before. The positive results will be used to promote the online collaboration internationally in the future.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2013

Katerina Bohle Carbonell, Amber Dailey-Hebert, Maike Gerken and Therese Grohnert

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional format which emphasizes collaborative and contextual learning and hence has favored face-to-face course design. However…

Abstract

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional format which emphasizes collaborative and contextual learning and hence has favored face-to-face course design. However, with the plentitude of online tools which technology offers nowadays, PBL courses can also be effectively offered to students who cannot physically be present at the campus. The change process from offline to hybrid, blended, or online PBL courses need to be carefully managed and the right combination of technology and learning activities selected from the ever increasing available set. Hybrid, blended, or online courses differ in the amount of integration between offline and online activities. A mixed-method design was used to elaborate on how the different (hybrid, blended, or online) PBL courses can be effectively build and taught to create learner engagement. Twelve people (change agent, instructor, and participants) were interviewed and 82 students filled out a course evaluation form. The data was used to describe how a hybrid, blended, or online course was created and how the instructor and students perceived it. Instructional and change management implications for implementation are presented. Instructional implications deal with the needs of the learner, the role of the instructor, and the importance of sound technology integration in the course. Change management implication highlights the need to foster intra-institutional collaboration.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention in e-learning Environments: Web 2.0 and Blended Learning Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-515-9

Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Dylan Powell Williams

This chapter will provide an overview of how Problem Based Learning (PBL) is used to support first year chemistry students at the University of Leicester, United Kingdom…

Abstract

This chapter will provide an overview of how Problem Based Learning (PBL) is used to support first year chemistry students at the University of Leicester, United Kingdom. The chapter will go on to provide an overview of the learning journey that we have undertaken over the last seven years by discussing the challenges we have encountered and by including details of how we have adapted our approach based on student and staff feedback and other considerations. The chapter is a follow up to a previously published article with a focus on the changes made since this initial publication (Williams, Woodward, Symons & Davies, 2010).

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (Stem) Programs: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-850-2

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-869-8

Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2013

Patrick Lynch, Mary T. Holden, Anthony Foley, Denis Harrington and Jennifer Hussey

While larger tourism enterprises benefit from a graduate management intake and continuing executive development, the owner of the small tourism operation is limited in…

Abstract

While larger tourism enterprises benefit from a graduate management intake and continuing executive development, the owner of the small tourism operation is limited in continuing education and professional development opportunities due to resource poverty, lack of appropriate and available tertiary tourism education. This chapter details the pedagogical and technological challenges faced by the education team at Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) in developing and implementing an innovative blended learning degree, customised to meet the requirements of the entrepreneur for a sense of involvement, relevance and flexibility. Understanding how to harmonise blended learning with face-to-face PBL was the cornerstone of success in the design and implementation of the programme and the insights gained will provide guidelines to educators who are responsible for the development of relevant and accessible business degree programmes for owner/managers of micro/small business enterprises.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention in e-learning Environments: Web 2.0 and Blended Learning Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-515-9

Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Ahmad Samarji

Communicating in English brings about a number of challenges for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students. Such challenges remain unaddressed and unresolved within the…

Abstract

Communicating in English brings about a number of challenges for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students. Such challenges remain unaddressed and unresolved within the traditional classroom settings, which are often dominated by intense guidance and instructions. The aim of this chapter is to address, discuss, and research project-based learning (PBL) as an effective pedagogical approach capable of prompting higher education students’ EFL capabilities – particularly English writing skills – in an engaging, student-centered manner that connects to their real-life experiences and develops a range of their generic skills. The PBL approach was designed, integrated, and implemented within the curriculum of the intensive English course (ENGL 101) delivered at Phoenicia University. Over a semester, 120 students across all four sections actively engaged, in groups, in PBL tasks, where they were required to identify problems in their community, propose solutions to these problems, and develop action plans to ensure that such solutions are sustainable. A mixed method approach that comprised a questionnaire (pre- and post-test) and semi-structured interviews was implemented. This chapter found that the adopted PBL method was very effective in promoting students’ engagement, ownership, and confidence in EFL. Additionally, this chapter showcased the power of PBL as a pedagogical device in humanizing EFL students’ experiences and education and provoking them to build their citizenship and agency in tackling problems and issues of relevance to them and their communities rather than being passive sufferers or observers of such problems and issues.

Details

Improving Classroom Engagement and International Development Programs: International Perspectives on Humanizing Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-473-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 October 2021

Jodie Birdman, Arnim Wiek and Daniel J. Lang

This research aims to investigate the role of project-based-learning within graduate sustainability curricula through the lens of key competence development. Project-based…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate the role of project-based-learning within graduate sustainability curricula through the lens of key competence development. Project-based learning has become a widely recommended pedagogy for sustainability education. It is hypothesized that through collaboration, student autonomy and real-world application, students develop key competencies for sustainability. This paper also aims to examine the connection between project-based learning and competence development on a program level from the student perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This two-year comparative case study follows the project-based-learning journeys of nine graduate sustainability students from three programs: the Master’s of Sustainability at Arizona State University, the Master’s of Sustainability Science at Leuphana University of Lüneburg and the Global Sustainability Science Master’s, an ASU and Leuphana collaboration. Over four semesters, the students each took part in four competence-oriented self-assessments and interviews to map their perceived learning throughout their programs. Additional contextual information was gathered from program and course materials and descriptions, instructor interviews and in vivo observations.

Findings

The defining aspects of project-based learning including collaboration, student autonomy and real-world connection do contribute to students’ self-perceived competence development. Student-driven and program-driven project-based learning experiences equally foster this result, as long as the pedagogical challenges of balancing support and student independence associated with each are mitigated through instructor actions, program design or individual student coping skills.

Originality/value

The results of this research can support higher education institutions in designing sustainability programs aimed at competence development through project-based learning. The focus on the curricular and program level combined with repeated overtime student-reported attribution to specific courses and activities bridges the gap between individual course case studies and theoretical recommendations for curriculum design. In addition to length and depth, this study also forefronts student experience of curricula as delivered.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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