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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2016

This chapter examines the topic of internal branding from an organizational/behavioral science perspective, theoretically and empirically investigating how organizational…

Abstract

Synopsis

This chapter examines the topic of internal branding from an organizational/behavioral science perspective, theoretically and empirically investigating how organizational members actually enact corporate brands. A mixed method research procedure serves to surface conscious (i.e., deliberate) and unconscious (i.e., tacit) internal brand meaning enactments in an internationally operating Austrian corporate business-to-business brand. The results are evidence of the potential complexity of real-life internal branding processes that limit the possibility of achieving a cohesive intended internal implementation of corporate brands. The chapter concludes with the managerial implication that purposeful managerial interventions necessitate an understanding of the social system that is the target of an internal branding initiative.

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Case Study Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-461-4

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2009

Sylvia von Wallpach and Arch G. Woodside

This chapter examines the topic of internal branding from an organizational/behavioral science perspective, theoretically and empirically investigating how organizational…

Abstract

This chapter examines the topic of internal branding from an organizational/behavioral science perspective, theoretically and empirically investigating how organizational members actually enact corporate brands. A mixed-method research procedure serves to surface conscious (i.e., deliberate) and unconscious (i.e., tacit) internal brand meaning enactments in an internationally operating Austrian corporate business-to-business (B2B) brand. The results are an evidence of the potential complexity of real-life internal branding processes that limit the possibility of achieving a cohesive intended internal implementation of corporate brands. The chapter concludes with the managerial implication that purposeful managerial interventions necessitate an understanding of the social system that is the target of the internal branding initiative

Details

Business-To-Business Brand Management: Theory, Research and Executivecase Study Exercises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-671-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

M. Claudia tom Dieck, Timothy Jung and Dai-In Han

Recent advancements in wearable computing offer opportunities for art galleries to provide a unique experience. However, to ensure successful implementation of this new…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent advancements in wearable computing offer opportunities for art galleries to provide a unique experience. However, to ensure successful implementation of this new technology in the visitor industry, it is essential to understand user requirements from a visitor’s point of view. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate visitors’ requirements for the development of a wearable smart glasses augmented reality (AR) application in the museum and art gallery context.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with 28 art gallery visitors were conducted and an affinity diagram technique was used to analyze the interviews.

Findings

The findings reveal that wearable AR is in its infancy and that technical and design issues have to be overcome for a full adoption. It reveals that content requirement, functional requirement, comfort, experience and resistance are important when developing and implementing the wearable AR application in the museum and art gallery contexts.

Originality/value

Mapping user requirements in the wearable smart glasses AR context using an affinity diagram is a new approach and therefore contributes to the creation of knowledge in the tourism domain. Practically, the area of wearable technologies and AR within the tourism and visitor industry context is still relatively unexplored, and the present paper provides a first foundation for the implementation of wearable smart glasses AR applications in the museum and art gallery context.

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Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Mohammed Al Balushi

Research on transparency has been concerned mainly with external transparency, leaving internal transparency understudied. In particular, there is a lack of empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on transparency has been concerned mainly with external transparency, leaving internal transparency understudied. In particular, there is a lack of empirical research on the relationship between internal transparency and organizational resilience. This paper aims at investigating how internal transparency impacts organizational resilience in a public entity. It also examines how (quality) management systems impact internal transparency, and thus organizational resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on semi-structured interviews covering the relevant topics. A total of 32 interviews were undertaken between January and May 2018.

Findings

The findings indicate that internal transparency contributes to better preparedness to adverse conditions by enhancing the ability to cumulate, locate and share knowledge. Similarly, management systems improve internal transparency through the enhancement of communication flow, use of indicators and accretion of a database.

Originality/value

The paper is the first, as evident from the literature review, to investigate how internal transparency impacts organizational resilience. Hence, it sheds light on a very important aspect of the effective management of quality, risk and reliability. It is also one of the first papers to examine the mediating role of (quality) management systems in organizational resilience.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Ipek Kazancoglu and Hatice Aydin

The growth of omni-channel retailing is causing consumers to change their habits and shopping behaviour. It is essential to understand the factors on purchase intention…

Abstract

Purpose

The growth of omni-channel retailing is causing consumers to change their habits and shopping behaviour. It is essential to understand the factors on purchase intention within the consumer context. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that are influencing consumers to use omni-channel in their shopping behaviour – specifically in the apparel sector in Turkey as an emerging country.

Design/methodology/approach

Designed as exploratory research, this study used four different focus groups. Focus groups were conducted with university students who have experienced the company’s omni-channel applications. The study sample included a total of 30 purposefully selected university students in Izmir, Turkey, who previously shopped at the same store. The selected retail store is the leading domestic shopping brand and the pioneer in omni-channel in the apparel and fashion sector in Turkey. The participants were given three company-related scenarios which were used to help the students to better understand omni-channel applications of the company. Then, they were asked to discuss their perceptions and intentions towards omni-channel shopping. Content analysis was used for analysing transcripts.

Findings

The findings of the focus groups have revealed 12 themes about the intentions of the university students towards omni-channel shopping. Among 12 themes, it is observed that 6 of them have similarities with the variables of the UTAUT2 model. The findings of the study showed that, beside the additional themes, the predetermined variables of the UTAUT2 model within the literature; which are “performance expectancy”, “effort expectancy”, “facilitating conditions”, “hedonic motivation”, “habit” and “price value” have affected purchasing intentions towards omni-channel shopping. This study proposed six additional themes which were not revealed in the previous studies on purchase intentions in an omni-channel shopping in apparel sector. The six additional themes proposed in this study are; “perceived trust”, “situational factors”, “perceived risk”, “anxiety”, “need for interaction” and “privacy concern”.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to the focus group interviews held in only one university with students from the same programme. The findings are obtained also only valid for the relevant retail store and city, and cannot yet be generalised.

Practical implications

The relationships suggested in this exploratory study can further be analysed by quantitative study. It is also claimed that the findings of this study can act as a framework to extend the UTAUT2 model by integrating perceived trust, situational factors, perceived risk, anxiety, need for interaction and privacy concern. This model will enable retailers to understand consumer expectations towards omni-channel shopping and to focus on integrating these factors through whole purchasing process in order to increase omni-channel sales.

Originality/value

The literature on omni-channel has concentrated on the retailers’ perspective, whereas this study aims to reveal an insight from the consumer perspective. The contribution of the study is to provide a framework for understanding the themes on consumer viewpoint in the omni-channel shopping behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

D.P. Mok, W.A. Wall, M. Bischoff and E. Ramm

The present study focusses on algorithmic aspects related to deformation dependent loads in non‐linear static finite element analysis. If the deformation dependency is…

Abstract

The present study focusses on algorithmic aspects related to deformation dependent loads in non‐linear static finite element analysis. If the deformation dependency is considered only on the right hand side, a considerable increase in the number of iterations follows. It may also cause failure of convergence in the proximity of critical points. If in turn the deformation dependent loading is included within the consistent linearization, an additional left hand side term emerges, the so‐called load stiffness matrix. In this paper several numerical test cases are used to show and quantify the influence of the two different approaches on the iteration process. Consideration of the complete load stiffness matrix may result in a cumbersome coding effort, different for each load case, and in certain cases its derivation is even not practicable at all. Therefore also several formulations for approximated load stiffness matrices are presented. It is shown that these simplifications not only reduce the additional effort for linearization and implementation, but also keep the iterative costs relatively small and still allow the calculation of the entire equilibrium path.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Lyn Daff and Lee D. Parker

The not-for-profit (NFP) context displays unique characteristics that include stakeholder diversity, multiple stakeholder agendas, and the pervasiveness of philanthropic…

Abstract

Purpose

The not-for-profit (NFP) context displays unique characteristics that include stakeholder diversity, multiple stakeholder agendas, and the pervasiveness of philanthropic values and related organisational mission. This study investigated accountants’ perceptions of NFPs’ characteristics that enable and inhibit their communication along with the strategies they adopt to overcome their communication challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative interview-based study is informed by Giddens’ structuration theory. Thirty NFP accountants, from three Australian states, were interviewed. Thematic analysis was used to identify the relationships between NFP organisational characteristics and accountants’ communication strategies, and their interactions with organisational structures.

Findings

The study reveals important relationships between many stakeholders with limited financial acumen, organisational resource constraints, the currency of NFP information technologies, the dominance of operational mission over financial imperatives, and the supply of organisational accountants. Accountants’ structural adaptations emerge in their adopting multiple forms of communications reframing.

Research limitations/implications

The NFP environment exhibits a mix of characteristics, some of which pose challenges for accountants’ communication while others facilitate their communication.

Social implications

Increasingly, governments are relying on NFPs for the provision of services once provided by the state. Enhancing NFP accountants’ communication has the potential to improve outcomes for NFPs.

Originality/value

The study broadens prior research on accountants’ communication beyond formal written reporting to recognise and articulate their informal communication strategies.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Charalampos Giousmpasoglou, Evangelia Marinakou and Anastasios Zopiatis

This study aims to explore the role General Managers (GMs) play in mitigating the effects of the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role General Managers (GMs) play in mitigating the effects of the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative structured interviews conducted online with 50 hospitality GMs from 45 countries are used to explore the impact of the pandemic on the industry’s operational norms and the role of managers in both managing the crisis and planning contingencies for recovery.

Findings

The findings enhance the conceptual capital in this emerging field and provide insights on how GMs behave during crises. Four related sub-themes emerged from the data analysis, namely, contingency planning and crisis management, resilience and impact on GM roles, the impact on hotels’ key functional areas and some GMs’ suggestions for the future of luxury hospitality.

Research limitations/implications

This study generates empirical data that inform contemporary debates about crisis management and resilience in hospitality organizations at a micro-level operational perspective.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that, in times of uncertainty and crisis, luxury hotel GMs are vital in coping with changes and leading their organizations to recovery. GMs’ resilience and renewed role and abilities enable them to adapt rapidly to external changes on their business environment.

Originality/value

This study is unique in terms of scale and depth, as it provides useful insights regarding the GM’s role during an unprecedented crisis such as COVID-19.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

Sonia Osorio Angel, Adriana Peña Pérez Negrón and Aurora Espinoza-Valdez

Most studies on Sentiment Analysis are performed in English. However, as the third most spoken language on the Internet, Sentiment Analysis for Spanish presents its…

Abstract

Purpose

Most studies on Sentiment Analysis are performed in English. However, as the third most spoken language on the Internet, Sentiment Analysis for Spanish presents its challenges from a semantic and syntactic point of view. This review presents a scope of the recent advances in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review on Sentiment Analysis for the Spanish language was conducted on recognized databases by the research community.

Findings

Results show classification systems through three different approaches: Lexicon based, Machine Learning based and hybrid approaches. Additionally, different linguistic resources as Lexicon or corpus explicitly developed for the Spanish language were found.

Originality/value

This study provides academics and professionals, a review of advances in Sentiment Analysis for the Spanish language. Most reviews on Sentiment Analysis are for English, and other languages such as Chinese or Arabic, but no updated reviews were found for Spanish.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Alexander Serenko

This study aims to explore the existence of knowledge sabotage in the contemporary organization from the perspective of the target.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the existence of knowledge sabotage in the contemporary organization from the perspective of the target.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected and analyzed 172 critical incidents reported by 109 employees who were targets of knowledge sabotage in their organizations.

Findings

Over 50 per cent of employees experienced at least one knowledge sabotage incident. Knowledge sabotage is driven by three factors, namely, gratification, retaliation against other employees and one’s malevolent personality. Knowledge saboteurs are more likely to provide intangible than tangible knowledge. Knowledge sabotage results in extremely negative consequences for individuals, organizations and third parties. Organizations often indirectly facilitate knowledge sabotage among their employees. Both knowledge saboteurs and their targets believe in their innocence – saboteurs are certain that their action was a necessary response to targets’ inappropriate workplace behavior, whereas targets insist on their innocence and hold saboteurs solely responsible.

Practical implications

Organizations should recruit employees with compatible personalities and working styles, introduce inter-employee conflict prevention and resolution procedures, develop anti-knowledge sabotage policies, clearly articulate the individual and organizational consequences of knowledge sabotage and eliminate zero-sum game-based incentives and rewards.

Originality/value

This is the first study documenting knowledge sabotage from the target’s perspective.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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