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1 – 10 of 456
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Ramesh S. and Jenarthanan M.P.

This study aims to focus on experimenting the performance of aluminum (Al) powder mixed electric discharge machining (PMEDM) of two different materials viz plastic mould…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on experimenting the performance of aluminum (Al) powder mixed electric discharge machining (PMEDM) of two different materials viz plastic mould die steel (AISI P20) and nickel-based super alloy (Nimonic 75). This experimental study also focuses on using three different tool materials such as copper, brass and tungsten to analyze their influence on the process output. These materials find many uses in industrial as well as aerospace applications. The performance measures considered in this work are material removal rate (MRR), tool wear rate (TWR) and surface roughness (SR).

Design/methodology/approach

The experimental design used in this work is based on Taguchi’s L18 orthogonal array. Besides considering work and tool material as one of the process variables, other process variables are peak current (Ip), pulse on time (Ton) and concentration of powder (Cp). The analysis of variance (ANOVA) is performed on the experimental data to determine the significant variables that influence the output.

Findings

It is found that copper produced maximum MRR and brass tool exhibited higher TWR. However, the surface finish of the machined work piece was very much improved by using the brass tool. Though the performance of tungsten tool lies between the above two tool materials, it showed very little wear during EDM with or without the addition of Al powder.

Originality/value

The experimental investigation of PMEDM of nickel-based super alloy (Nimonic 75) has not been attempted before. Besides that, the study on the influence of tungsten tool on the performance of EDM is also very limited.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Ramesh S., M.P. Jenarthanan and Bhuvanesh Kanna A.S.

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the performance of powder-mixed electric discharge machining (PMEDM) using three different powders which are aluminium (Al)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the performance of powder-mixed electric discharge machining (PMEDM) using three different powders which are aluminium (Al), silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3). Besides that, the influence of different tool materials was also studied in this experimental investigation. Hence, the work material selected for this purpose was AISI P20 steel and tool materials were copper, brass and tungsten. The performance measures considered in this work were material removal rate (MRR), tool wear rate and radial over cut (ROC).

Design/methodology/approach

The process variables considered in this study were powder types, powder concentration, tool materials, peak current and pulse on time. The experimental design, based on Taguchi’s L27 orthogonal array, was adopted to conduct experiments. Significant parameters were identified by performing the analysis of variance on the experimental data.

Findings

Based on the analysis of results, it was observed that copper tool combined with Al powder produced maximum MRR (58.35 mm3/min). Similarly, the Al2O3 powder combined with tungsten tool has resulted least ROC (0.04865 mm). It was also observed that wear rate of tungsten tool was very low (0.0145 mm3/min).

Originality/value

The experimental investigation of PMEDM involving three different powders (Al, SiC and Al2O3) was not attempted before. Moreover, the study of influence of different tool materials (Cu, brass and W) together with the different powders on the electric discharge machining performance was very limited.

Details

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1573-6105

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2009

Deborah Kelly and Alfred Lewis

Given that most nonprofit organizations are viewed as inefficient and unresponsive, and the survival or growth of the organization is not proof of its ability to improve…

3966

Abstract

Purpose

Given that most nonprofit organizations are viewed as inefficient and unresponsive, and the survival or growth of the organization is not proof of its ability to improve social conditions, this study aims to examine the nonprofit organization in terms of its ability to be a change agent, reducing needs rather than meeting them and tackling underlying causes of problems. The significance of the social entrepreneur for this study was to provide the definition for the highest possible level of social impact by a human service sector nonprofit organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The research population for this study was composed of 501(c)(3) public charities in the P20 National Taxonomy of Exempt Entities (NTEE) category with annual income between $100,000 and $10,000,000. The NTEE code P20 corresponds to the category human service organizations; nonprofit organizations in this category serve people in the USA with a broad range of social services. The GuideStar database was used to gather information for the sample. The database includes 1.7 million NPs registered in the USA. The data are based on the Internal Revenue Service Form 990 filed annually by all 501(c) organizations with gross receipts of $25,000 or more. The total number of P20 organizations in the GuideStar database in the stated income range was found to be 2971. The total number of responses to the survey was 105, of which 99 were fully completed and usable, representing a response rate of 8.5 percent.

Findings

These findings support conclusion from prior research which defined high impact nonprofit organizations as those who created social change by focusing on the difference they could make in the communities by thinking and acting in new ways to work within the pressures of the environment.

Research limitations/implications

Similar to other studies, this paper concluded that there was no easy measure of tool to effectively assess the performance of nonprofit organizations.

Practical implications

It was found that the human service sector nonprofit organizations in the study adopted more strategic orientation in order to empower those being helped to become independent.

Originality/value

This paper codified human service sector nonprofit organizations into specific categories to measure the impact on the micro and macro environment.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Diwesh Babruwan Meshram, Vikas Gohil, Yogesh Madan Puri and Sachin Ambade

Machining of curved channels using electrical discharge machining (EDM) is a novel approach. In this study, an experimental setup was designed, developed and mounted on…

Abstract

Purpose

Machining of curved channels using electrical discharge machining (EDM) is a novel approach. In this study, an experimental setup was designed, developed and mounted on die-sinking EDM to manufacture curve channels in AISI P20 mold steel.

Design/methodology/approach

The effect of specific machining parameters such as peak current, pulse on time, duty factor and lift over material removal rate (MRR) and tool wear rate (TWR) were studied. Multi-objective optimization was performed using Taguchi technique and Jaya algorithm.

Findings

The experimental results revealed current and pulse on time to have the predominant effect over material removal and tool wear diagnostic parameters with contributions of 39.67, 32.04% and 43.05, 36.52%, respectively. The improvements in material removal and tool wear as per the various optimization techniques were 35.48 and 10.91%, respectively.

Originality/value

Thus, Taguchi method was used for effective optimization of the machining parameters. Further, nature-based Jaya algorithm was implemented for obtaining the optimum values of TWR and MRR.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

M. Claudia tom Dieck, Timothy Jung and Dai-In Han

Recent advancements in wearable computing offer opportunities for art galleries to provide a unique experience. However, to ensure successful implementation of this new…

1925

Abstract

Purpose

Recent advancements in wearable computing offer opportunities for art galleries to provide a unique experience. However, to ensure successful implementation of this new technology in the visitor industry, it is essential to understand user requirements from a visitor’s point of view. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate visitors’ requirements for the development of a wearable smart glasses augmented reality (AR) application in the museum and art gallery context.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with 28 art gallery visitors were conducted and an affinity diagram technique was used to analyze the interviews.

Findings

The findings reveal that wearable AR is in its infancy and that technical and design issues have to be overcome for a full adoption. It reveals that content requirement, functional requirement, comfort, experience and resistance are important when developing and implementing the wearable AR application in the museum and art gallery contexts.

Originality/value

Mapping user requirements in the wearable smart glasses AR context using an affinity diagram is a new approach and therefore contributes to the creation of knowledge in the tourism domain. Practically, the area of wearable technologies and AR within the tourism and visitor industry context is still relatively unexplored, and the present paper provides a first foundation for the implementation of wearable smart glasses AR applications in the museum and art gallery context.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2022

Frieder Lempp and Maïs Testa

The purpose of this study is to explore the views of practicing negotiators on their experiences of deception and their strategies for detecting deceptive behavior. A…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the views of practicing negotiators on their experiences of deception and their strategies for detecting deceptive behavior. A thematic analysis of interview data complements the existing experimental literature on deception and negotiation. The authors compare the experiences of practicing negotiators with the results found in experimental studies and provide practical recommendations for negotiators and managers regarding the detection of deception.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 19 practicing commercial negotiators in France by way of semi-structured interviews. The transcribed data was analyzed by way of thematic analysis using the software NVivo 12. Experiences and behaviors identified in the negotiation literature as key factors for the detection of deception acted as a coding framework.

Findings

A thematic analysis of the data revealed four themes related to the experience of deception that negotiators perceived as particularly important: the frequency, form, interpretation and consequences of deception. Further, the analysis revealed four factors that negotiators believed influenced their ability to detect deceptive communication: physical cues, such as body language and micro-expressions, and verbal cues, including contradictions and inconsistencies, emotional cues and environmental cues. Finally, the strategies described by negotiators to detect deception could be classified according to six themes: careful listening, asking questions, emotional intelligence, intuition, checking consistency and requesting evidence.

Research limitations/implications

This study elicited the views of commercial negotiators without collecting information from their negotiation counterparts. Hence, it was not possible to verify whether the reported detection of deceptive communication was accurate. Because of optimism bias, the participants in the sample were likely to overrate their ability to detect deception. In part, this was helpful because the negotiators spoke freely about their strategies for dealing with deceptive counterparts allowing the identification of techniques to improve the efficacy of detecting deceptive communication.

Practical implications

Participants overwhelmingly expressed that there is a lack of training on deception in negotiation. It is suggested that the results of this study inform the development of training courses on the detection of deception. In particular, it is recommended that training courses should cover the following topics: how to anticipate and avoid deceptive behavior; how to effectively respond to deceptive behavior; the role of emotional intelligence in detecting deceptive behavior; careful listening and asking questions; and the role of intuition in detecting deception.

Originality/value

Prior empirical studies on the detection of deception have not specifically investigated the range of self-reported strategies used by practicing negotiators to detect deceptive communication. This study addresses this gap. This study complements existing experimental works by widening the spectrum of potential variables that play a role in the effective detection of deceptive communication.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2007

V. Kerry Smith and Jared C. Carbone

This paper demonstrates the importance of general equilibrium (GE) feedback effects inside and outside markets for the measurement of the efficiency costs of taxes in a…

Abstract

This paper demonstrates the importance of general equilibrium (GE) feedback effects inside and outside markets for the measurement of the efficiency costs of taxes in a distorted economy. Our specific focus is on the changes in environmental amenities that can result from pollution externalities generated from production activities. Even when amenities are under three percent of virtual income, the error in the GE approximations of the welfare effects of new taxes with pre-existing distortions can increase threefold. The nature of the link between the source of the external effects influencing amenities and the changes in amenity services can alter the conclusions one would make about the merits of an intervention based on benefit–cost analyses.

Details

Research in Law and Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-455-3

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Marian Mahat

Medical education is an evidence-driven professional field that operates in an increasingly regulated environment as compared to other fields within universities. The…

5799

Abstract

Purpose

Medical education is an evidence-driven professional field that operates in an increasingly regulated environment as compared to other fields within universities. The purpose of this paper is to establish the extent to which Porter’s five competitive forces framework (Porter, 2008) can drive the management of medical schools in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on data from semi-structured interviews with over 20 staff from 6 case study Australian medical schools, this paper explores Australian medical education, by looking at the current policy context, structure and interactions between organizations within the system.

Findings

The findings provide evidence that environmental forces affect the nature of competition in medical education, and that competitive advantage can be gained by medical schools from a sustained analysis of the industry in which they operate in. Consequently, it is possible to apply a pre-dominantly profit-oriented framework to higher education.

Research limitations/implications

As an industry facing increasing pressure toward marketization and competition, the findings provide sufficient evidence that an analysis of higher education as an industry is possible.

Practical implications

The findings provide evidence that strategic leadership and management in higher education should encompass greater levels of delegation and decision making at all levels. Effective leadership should focus on creating an inspiring vision of the future through a sustained analysis of the industry in which they operate.

Originality/value

The study has made a key contribution through an industry analysis of Australian medical education, which provide important implications for leadership and management in higher education. The study is of significant value to researchers as well as senior management in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1968

A PAPER to the Institution of Mechanical Engineers by Dr. A. A. Parry and Dr. L. A. Mitchell of the Central Electricity Generating Board (Paper P20/68) giving details of…

Abstract

A PAPER to the Institution of Mechanical Engineers by Dr. A. A. Parry and Dr. L. A. Mitchell of the Central Electricity Generating Board (Paper P20/68) giving details of the authors' research on solid lubricants for use within gas‐cooled power reactors is published with the intention of inviting written discussion. We publish the main details of this paper; the complete version is available from the I.Mech.E.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Andrew Ebekozien, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, Wellington Didibhuku Didibhuku Thwala, Marvelous Isibor Aigbedion and Iliye Faith Ogbaini

Research shows that employers are demanding generic skills from employees to complement disciplinary expertise. Evidence shows that majority of the higher institutions are…

Abstract

Purpose

Research shows that employers are demanding generic skills from employees to complement disciplinary expertise. Evidence shows that majority of the higher institutions are struggling to meet this demand, especially in developing nations. Hence, these skills may be acquired while in the workplace through training and retraining. Studies concerning the Nigerian built environment professionals (BEP) generic skills in the workplace are scarce. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate Nigeria’s BEP generic skills in the workplace via an unexplored mechanism and proffer feasible policy solutions that can improve BEP generic skills development.

Design/methodology/approach

The views of BEP were collated via a phenomenology type of qualitative research design across two major Nigerian cities where construction activities are soaring. Virtual interviews were conducted for 20 selected BEP. Data saturation was accomplished and the emerged three themes were analysed through a thematic analysis.

Findings

Findings show that generic skills enhance value for money in construction project delivery. But many of these professionals do not possess these skills in their daily operations. This has raised concerns about the present curriculum for preparing the built environment graduates in today’s profession. Findings categorised the hindrances into employers related-hindrances and employees related-hindrances in Nigeria’s BEP context.

Research limitations/implications

This study is confined to the relevance and hindrances of the generic skills for Nigerian BEP, and proffer feasible policies to promote generic skills in the workplace via a qualitative approach. Future study is needed to investigate the role of the various professional Institutes within Nigeria’s built environment in promoting generic skills.

Practical implications

The paper advanced key stakeholders including BEP Institutes and regulatory bodies to redirect their continuing professional development towards developing professional values and identities as a trajectory to promote the growth of BEP generic skills in the workplace.

Originality/value

The proposed framework can be used to promote the implementation of generic skills for BEP across all levels. This would assist and stir up policymakers and other stakeholders in connection with the implementation of generic skills within the BEP.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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