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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

L. Vanderheydt, P. Vuylsteke, P. Jansen, A. Oosterlinck and H. Van den Berghe

This paper is part II of an overview of the work of the Pattern and Image Processing group of the Leuven University, presenting some of the industrial applications.

Abstract

This paper is part II of an overview of the work of the Pattern and Image Processing group of the Leuven University, presenting some of the industrial applications.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

L. Vanderheydt, P. Vuylsteke, P. Jansen, A. Oosterlinck and H. Van den Berghe

The Pattern Recognition and Image Processing group of the Leuven University is engaged in medical as well as in industrial projects. This paper is Part I of an overview of…

Abstract

The Pattern Recognition and Image Processing group of the Leuven University is engaged in medical as well as in industrial projects. This paper is Part I of an overview of some of the industrial applications.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

P. Vuylsteke, P. Defraeye, J. Van Daele, A. Oosterlinck and H. Van den Berghe

Recognition of plane objects can be achieved by calculating the area and first and second moments of the object. In the work described a hardwired videoprocessor linked to…

Abstract

Recognition of plane objects can be achieved by calculating the area and first and second moments of the object. In the work described a hardwired videoprocessor linked to a 16‐bit microprocessor enables the recognition to be achieved within 30 milliseconds.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Andrzej Tomczyk

Rzeszów University of Technology has undertaken the task of designing and providing of equipment to a flying laboratory. This paper presents basic design principles of the…

Abstract

Rzeszów University of Technology has undertaken the task of designing and providing of equipment to a flying laboratory. This paper presents basic design principles of the Inertial Reference Unit (IRU) which employs measuring signals from the Fiber Optic Gyros (FOG), accelerometers and electronic compass module. A microcomputer follows the algorithm of complementary filtration for of calculating the Euler angles for the aircraft attitude (pitch, roll and heading), angular rates, and linear accelerations. The correction systems that minimize error of the steady‐state measuring have been employed. The results of computer simulations, lab tests and selected flight tests have also been presented. The Inertial Reference Unit μIRU‐1 was tested in flight on board of the general aviation aircraft PZL‐110 “Koliber”. It has been confirmed that metrological properties of the system are appropriate for the purposes of teaching process. Currently, a modified version of the unit is being prepared. The new IRU is planned as a main reference unit for integrated flight control system of general aviation aircraft.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 74 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2019

Ravinder Singh and Kuldeep Singh Nagla

The purpose of this research is to provide the necessarily and resourceful information regarding range sensors to select the best fit sensor for robust autonomous…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to provide the necessarily and resourceful information regarding range sensors to select the best fit sensor for robust autonomous navigation. Autonomous navigation is an emerging segment in the field of mobile robot in which the mobile robot navigates in the environment with high level of autonomy by lacking human interactions. Sensor-based perception is a prevailing aspect in the autonomous navigation of mobile robot along with localization and path planning. Various range sensors are used to get the efficient perception of the environment, but selecting the best-fit sensor to solve the navigation problem is still a vital assignment.

Design/methodology/approach

Autonomous navigation relies on the sensory information of various sensors, and each sensor relies on various operational parameters/characteristic for the reliable functioning. A simple strategy shown in this proposed study to select the best-fit sensor based on various parameters such as environment, 2 D/3D navigation, accuracy, speed, environmental conditions, etc. for the reliable autonomous navigation of a mobile robot.

Findings

This paper provides a comparative analysis for the diverse range sensors used in mobile robotics with respect to various aspects such as accuracy, computational load, 2D/3D navigation, environmental conditions, etc. to opt the best-fit sensors for achieving robust navigation of autonomous mobile robot.

Originality/value

This paper provides a straightforward platform for the researchers to select the best range sensor for the diverse robotics application.

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Alei Fan, Han Shen, Laurie Wu, Anna S. Mattila and Anil Bilgihan

Consumers increasingly depend on the internet as the information source to make their hospitality decisions, which highlights the need for more research in online…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers increasingly depend on the internet as the information source to make their hospitality decisions, which highlights the need for more research in online recommendation. Due to the globalization, culture and its effects on marketing become an increasingly important subject to investigate. Therefore, this paper aims to offer a cross-cultural investigation of consumers’ different trustworthiness and credibility perceptions when facing online recommendations from different information resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses the source-credibility theory to examine consumers’ responses to online recommendations from two sources. Participants were recruited from two equivalent marketing panels in each culture. A 2 (online recommendation source: in-group vs out-group) by 2 (culture: American vs Chinese) between-subjects quasi-experiment was conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results demonstrate that culture moderates consumer responses to the two types of online sources. Chinese consumers, due to their more collectivist nature, exhibit higher levels of purchase intent when the recommendation originates from an in-group rather than from an out-group. Such differences are not observed among the more individualist American consumers. Furthermore, trustworthiness plays an important role in influencing Chinese consumers’ perception of recommendation credibility and the consequent purchase intent.

Practical implications

This research provides guidelines to hospitality practitioners when developing their social networking sites and online marketing strategies across different cultures.

Originality/value

The current study conducts an in-depth investigation of cultural differences in consumers’ perceptions of and reactions to online recommendations from other customers with various social distances.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2016

Elke Rogge, Eva Kerselaers and Charlotte Prové

In urban planning, peri-urban areas are often addressed with an urban-centric view on development, disregarding the multifunctional and dynamic opportunities that these…

Abstract

In urban planning, peri-urban areas are often addressed with an urban-centric view on development, disregarding the multifunctional and dynamic opportunities that these spaces offer. As a consequence, we argue that land use functions such as agriculture do not reach their full potential, despite the increasing enthusiasm for peri-urban and urban agriculture. This chapter has a twofold structure: first it explores the opportunities and challenges for agriculture in peri-urban areas; and second, it studies success factors for envisioning processes promoting peri-urban agriculture in urban policy and planning.

Through action research, we gather and compare data from two envisioning processes in the Flemish cities of Ghent and Kortrijk. Both processes were initiated by the local authorities, with the purpose of developing a spatial vision for agriculture in peri-urban areas.

Results show that in both contexts, pressure on farmland is a key issue. In addition, we highlight that multifunctionality is rather complex, both in practice and from a governance perspective, but nevertheless promising as a territorial concept in envisioning processes. Regarding the envisioning process itself, the analysis shows that clarity and consensus on the objectives of the process, delineation of the study area, policy support, clear leadership, and inserting sound and reliable data into the process are important success factors.

This chapter provides insight into the visions, plans and strategies needed to embrace the potential of agriculture in peri-urban areas, through the exploration and valuation of participatory envisioning processes. Future research is needed to explore the implementation phases of envisioning processes in urban planning.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Mary M. Cutler and Gabriela Paszkowska

Investors around the world are eager to buy shares of newly‐privatized state firms. This behavior is understandable in light of the evidence that many governments…

Abstract

Investors around the world are eager to buy shares of newly‐privatized state firms. This behavior is understandable in light of the evidence that many governments underprice initial public offerings. This paper looks at Eastern Europe's first public offerings of privatized state firms (in Poland) and finds evidence of significant underpricing. We also find that the level of underpricing was masked by special discounts and the redemption, at par, of discounted government bonds. Using conservative assumptions we conclude that underpricing was almost 30%, three times the level reflected by recorded stock prices. Our study of the new Polish stock market indicates the need for caution when using data from developing capital markets. Prices, returns, trends and market capitalization rates in Poland were affected by unique, local financial practices.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 22 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Ming Cheng, Chris K. Anderson, Zhen Zhu and S. Chan Choi

This study aims to address the following research questions: Do the two types of service firms (individual or aggregator) have similar competitiveness on online search…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the following research questions: Do the two types of service firms (individual or aggregator) have similar competitiveness on online search ads? How should the two types of service firms select optimal branded keywords to improve search performance? In addition, how do consumers’ search queries influence the service search performance of the two types of service firms?

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors conduct an empirical analysis by building a two-stage choice modeling on the process of search engine ranking and consumer click-through decisions. The authors estimate the parameter coefficients and test the hypotheses using maximum likelihood estimation in the logistic regression model.

Findings

The empirical findings suggest that consumer response rates are highly dependent upon three aspects (service types, branded keyword strategy and consumer search query). First, the authors found that service aggregators receive greater consumer responses than individual service providers. Second, depending upon the various branded keyword strategies (e.g. generic vs branded, “within-type” vs “cross-type”) implemented by service aggregators or individual firms, the expected consumer responses could be quite different. Finally, customer’s search query, being either generic or branded, also has direct effect and interactive effect with service type on how consumers would response to the sponsored ads in the service search process.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of the research is twofold. First, conversion rate is not considered in the model estimation due to the nature of the data set. Second, the discussion about the keywords selection strategies is focusing on the hospitality industry. Future research shall further validate the generalizability into other industries.

Practical implications

First, given this competitive advantage, service aggregators should take an aggressive approach to adopting paid search strategy in acquiring new users and enhance its brand salience in the service ecosystem. Second, when considering other competitor’s brand names to include, if a firm is a service provider (e.g. hotel), a strategy that can help it receive higher consumer response would be to use “within-type” rather than “cross-type” branded keyword strategy. If a firm is a service aggregator, a better branded keyword strategy would be to use “across-type” instead of “within-type” approach. In addition, given that consumer’s brand awareness can influence the effectiveness of branded keyword strategy, online service search should target consumers in earlier stages of a decision journey.

Social implications

The authors believe their theoretical framework can provide actionable solutions to service firms to ease customer’s search process, increase customer’s stickiness using search engines and add value to the customer relationships with all services entities within the digital ecosystem.

Originality/value

This study is the first to expand online search marketing into granule examinations (main and interactive effects of three key factors) in the service search domain. First, the authors differentiate service firms into two categories – online travel aggregators and individual hotels in the model. Second, the authors introduce two sets of new classifications of branded keywords for online service search research (i.e. own versus other brand and “cross-type” versus “within-type” branded keywords). Third, this study integrates service consumers’ search word specificity into the conceptual framework which is often missing in previous online search research.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Colleen W. Cameron

Reports intensive country studies conducted for a sample of tencountries – five historically socially planned and fivepredominantly market economies – for comparative…

Abstract

Reports intensive country studies conducted for a sample of ten countries – five historically socially planned and five predominantly market economies – for comparative analyses of socioeconomic‐political characteristics prior to privatization. Purpose was to discern if there were any common factors descriptive of capitalist and/or socialist countries prior to privatization. Constructs from a common set of factors descriptive of all the economies in the sample prior to initiation of privatization, a general model of preconditions for privatization. Results of limited testing appeared to lend credence to the model.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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