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1 – 10 of 249
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

M. Vijaya Kumar, P. Sampath, S. Suresh, S.N. Omkar and Ranjan Ganguli

This paper seeks to present a feedback error learning neuro‐controller for an unstable research helicopter.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present a feedback error learning neuro‐controller for an unstable research helicopter.

Design/methodology/approach

Three neural‐aided flight controllers are designed to satisfy the ADS‐33 handling qualities specifications in pitch, roll and yaw axes. The proposed controller scheme is based on feedback error learning strategy in which the outer loop neural controller enhances the inner loop conventional controller by compensating for unknown non‐linearity and parameter uncertainties. The basic building block of the neuro‐controller is a nonlinear auto regressive exogenous (NARX) input neural network. For each neural controller, the parameter update rule is derived using Lyapunov‐like synthesis. An offline finite time training is used to provide asymptotic stability and on‐line learning strategy is employed to handle parameter uncertainty and nonlinearity.

Findings

The theoretical results are validated using simulation studies based on a nonlinear six degree‐of‐freedom helicopter undergoing an agile maneuver. The neural controller performs well in disturbance rejection is the presence of gust and sensor noise.

Practical implications

The neuro‐control approach presented in this paper is well suited to unmanned and small‐scale helicopters.

Originality/value

The study shows that the neuro‐controller meets the requirements of ADS‐33 handling qualities specifications of a helicopter.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 83 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

Pavithra Sampath, Rupashree Baral and Mansi Rastogi

This study investigated the crossover of work–family conflict (WFC) from supervisors to subordinates employed in conventional work settings. The authors hypothesized that…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated the crossover of work–family conflict (WFC) from supervisors to subordinates employed in conventional work settings. The authors hypothesized that the supervisor’s WFC would impact the subordinate’s level of WFC, and the level of crossover would vary with relationship quality or LMX.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed a matched set of 150 supervisors and 193 subordinates from several services organizations who were recruited using a snowballing technique. Data were analysed using hierarchical regression analyses and moderation testing.

Findings

Results confirmed a significant direct crossover path. Further, the crossover was found to be lowered in the event of higher LMX quality.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide significant insights into the conditions under which transmission of WFC takes place by broadening crossover research in the work–family area. Future studies must explore the crossover of work–family enrichment and the role of leadership styles, empathy and perspective taking of subordinates in the crossover.

Practical implications

Supervisors must endeavour to reduce the level of WFC of subordinates by trying to build high-quality LMX by regularly interacting with them and by providing them a supportive climate. Employees in turn must support supervisors in various means, which will help them gaining manager’s trust and support.

Originality/value

Examination of the potential mitigating effect of high-quality LMX in the crossover of WFC in supervisor–subordinate dyads has rarely been investigated in the past.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Lekha Laxman and Abdul Haseeb Ansari

This paper seeks to provide an in‐depth discussion on the impact of agricultural biotechnology in developing and least developed countries (LDCs) as well as the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an in‐depth discussion on the impact of agricultural biotechnology in developing and least developed countries (LDCs) as well as the concomitant biosafety concerns that might have an impact on trade and the environment whilst highlighting the importance of choosing development pathways that are conducive to the specific needs of these nations without endangering the biodiversity and affecting people's health.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a socio‐legal approach by undertaking a content analysis of decided cases, relevant treaties and existing studies conducted in areas related to agricultural biotechnology within the framework of sustainable development imperatives.

Findings

The paper suggests that developing countries venturing into agricultural biotechnology need to enrich the technology according to their needs and capabilities in order to be able to weigh the benefits against the risks in the production and import of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) specifically via the implementation of the “precautionary principle” and viable “risk assessment” techniques which conform to their existing international law obligations in view of the findings that most of these nations have not formulated adequate legal and institutional frameworks supported with the necessary expertise to regulate, monitor, and ensure safety of agricultural GMOs produced and/or imported by them.

Practical implications

The issues and suggestions in this paper will enable the development process of developing and least developed economies to conform to the tenets of sustainable development and minimize the loss of Earth's biodiversity.

Originality/value

The paper is of practical use to stakeholders and policymakers alike venturing into agricultural biotechnology. It pools the findings of a cross‐section of studies to look at the implications therein and the arising biosafety and trade issues with special reference to developing and LDCs.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Mike Szymanski, Ivan Valdovinos and Evodio Kaltenecker

This study aims to examine the relationship between cultural distances between countries and their scores in the Corruption Perception Index (CPI), which is the most…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between cultural distances between countries and their scores in the Corruption Perception Index (CPI), which is the most commonly used measure of corruption in international business (IB) research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied fixed-effect (generalized least squares) statistical modeling technique to analyze 1,580 year-country observations.

Findings

The authors found that the CPI score is determined to a large extent by cultural distances between countries, specifically the distance to the USA and to Denmark.

Research limitations/implications

CPI is often used as a sole measure of state-level corruption in IB research. The results show that the measure is significantly influenced by cultural differences and hence it should be applied with great caution, preferably augmented with other measures.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to look at cultural distances as determinants of CPI score. The authors empirically test whether the CPI is culturally biased.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Süleyman Uyar and Kürşad Çavuşoğlu

Due to the developments in information technologies, new concepts and practices have emerged in the field of accounting and auditing. One of these concepts is the concept…

Abstract

Due to the developments in information technologies, new concepts and practices have emerged in the field of accounting and auditing. One of these concepts is the concept of Forensic Accounting. Forensic accounting acts as a bridge between law and accounting sciences. Academic strutting about forensic accounting carried out in Turkey is increasing every day. In this study, we aim to examine the views of Turkish accounting academicians about skills of forensic accountant. Within this scope, we investigate whether there is any difference in views of Turkish accounting academicians by their gender, title, age, experience and university department (faculty, vocational school, etc.). Survey was sent to 543 Turkish accounting academicians via e-mail. 80 responses were used as data. Data analysis was made in SPSS Statistics 17.0. Means, standard deviations and percentages were computed for items related to skills of forensic accountant. Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used to analyse whether there was any difference in views of Turkish accounting academicians by their gender, title, age, experience and university department. According to findings, the skills rated as most important by Turkish academicians are, respectively, deductive analysis, critical thinking and unstructured problem solving. The skills rated as least important by Turkish academicians are, respectively, oral communication, investigative flexibility and analytical proficiency. There is a significant difference in rating of the importance of critical thinking, investigative flexibility, analytical proficiency and written communication by gender and there is a significant difference in rating of the importance of deductive analysis, unstructured problem solving and composure by experience year as academician.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Audit Management and Forensic Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-636-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2016

Thomas Derek Robinson and Jessica Andrea Chelekis

This conceptual paper diagnoses the fundamental tensions between the social temporality of sustainability and the individual temporality of marketing in the Dominant…

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper diagnoses the fundamental tensions between the social temporality of sustainability and the individual temporality of marketing in the Dominant Social Paradigm. We propose the notion of ‘existentialized sustainability’ as a possible way forward.

Methodology/approach

We take the Heideggerian perspective that death may bring individual and societal time into a common framework. From here, we compare anthropological and consumer culture research on funerary rites in non-modern societies with contemporary societies of the DSP.

Findings

Funerary rites reveal important insights into how individuals relate to their respective societies. Individuals are viewed as important contributors to the maintenance and regeneration of the group in non-modern societies. In contrast, funerary rites for individuals in the DSP are private, increasingly informal, and unconnected to sustaining society at large. This analysis reveals clear parallels between the goals of sustainability and the values of non-modern funerary rites.

Social implications

We propose the metaphor of a funerary rite for sustainability to promote consciousness towards societal futures. The idea is to improve ‘quality of death’ through sustainability – in other words, the ‘existentialization of sustainability’. This opens up a possible strategy for marketers to actively contribute to a societal shift towards a New Environmental Paradigm (NEP).

Originality/value

The Heideggerian approach is a novel way to identify and reconcile the epistemic contradictions between sustainability and marketing. This diagnosis suggests a way in which marketing can address the wicked problem of global sustainability challenges, perhaps allowing a new spirituality in consumption.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-495-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Premalatha J. and Sheela D.

This paper aims to present the design of a compact vertically polarized four-element UWB antenna suitable for MIMO communications.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the design of a compact vertically polarized four-element UWB antenna suitable for MIMO communications.

Design/methodology/approach

The unit cell antenna is constructed using a square ring radiator excited through a stepped impedance feed. The proposed antenna covers the Ultra-wideband (UWB) spectrum ranging from 2.2 to 12.3 GHz. The isolation between the unit cell antennas in the array is enhanced using a simple microstrip line resonator. The decoupling element is connected to the ground through a via.

Findings

The proposed scheme offers at least 16 dB improvement in the port-to-port coupling. Furthermore, the four-element antenna array is constructed using a specific interlocking scheme. The proposed antenna array’s Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) performance metrics are analyzed.

Originality/value

By suitably selecting the excitation port, directional radiation patterns can be realized. The combined radiation pattern covers 360 degrees. A prototype antenna array is fabricated, and the simulation results are verified using real-time experiments. The proposed antenna is a suitable candidate for shark fin housing in automotive communications.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Sashika Abeydeera, Helen Tregidga and Kate Kearins

In recognition of the potential for Buddhism to advance sustainability, this paper aims to investigate whether Buddhism appears to be informing the sustainability…

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Abstract

Purpose

In recognition of the potential for Buddhism to advance sustainability, this paper aims to investigate whether Buddhism appears to be informing the sustainability practices of corporations within a particular national context. Corporate sustainability reports are used as a site of analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Sixteen corporate sustainability reports from a set of sustainability award-winning corporations in Sri Lanka, a country with a strong Buddhist presence, are analysed. Evidence of Buddhist principles and values related to sustainability is sought to ascertain the extent to which Buddhism is evident in disclosures within the reports. The influence of global institutions is also considered.

Findings

Analysis reveals surprisingly little evidence of Buddhist principles and values in the corporate sustainability reports of these award-winning corporations. Sustainability reporting practices are revealed to be highly institutionalised by global influences, with the majority of the reports examined explicitly embracing global standardisation. The standardisation of corporate sustainability reporting through the pursuit of globally accepted reporting frameworks is argued to have caused a disconnect between Buddhism as a prevalent institutional force in the local culture and context and the corporate representations evident in such reporting. Potential consequences of this disconnect in relation to the ability for Buddhism to inform sustainability practices at the organisational level are considered.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on corporate sustainability reporting through considering whether local cultural context is represented within such reports and possible reasons and consequences.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Hoi-Yin Sim, Rahizar Ramli and Ahmad Saifizul

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of reciprocating compressor speeds and valve conditions on the roor-mean-square (RMS) value of burst acoustic emission…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of reciprocating compressor speeds and valve conditions on the roor-mean-square (RMS) value of burst acoustic emission (AE) signals associated with the physical motion of valves. The study attempts to explore the potential of AE signal in the estimation of valve damage under varying compressor speeds.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involves the acquisition of AE signal, valve flow rate, pressure and temperature at the suction valve of an air compressor with speed varrying from 450 to 800 rpm. The AE signals correspond to one compressor cycle obtained from two simulated valve damage conditions, namely, the single leak and double leak conditions are compared to those of the normal valve plate. To examine the effects of valve conditions and speeds on AE RMS values, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) is conducted. Finally, regression analysis is performed to investigate the relationship of AE RMS with the speed and valve flow rate for different valve conditions.

Findings

The results showed that AE RMS values computed from suction valve opening (SVO), suction valve closing (SVC) and discharge valve opening (DVO) events are significantly affected by both valve conditions and speeds. The AE RMS value computed from SVO event showed high linear correlation with speed compared to SVC and DVO events for all valve damage conditions. As this study is conducted at a compressor running at freeload, increasing speed of compressor also results in the increment of flow rate. Thus, the valve flow rate can also be empirically derived from the AE RMS value through the regression method, enabling a better estimation of valve damages.

Research limitations/implications

The experimental test rig of this study is confined to a small pressure ratio range of 1.38–2.03 (free-loading condition). Besides, the air compressor is assumed to be operated at a constant speed.

Originality/value

This study employed the statistical methods namely the ANOVA and regression analysis for valve damage estimation at varying compressor speeds. It can enable a plant personnel to make a better prediction on the loss of compressor efficiency and help them to justify the time for valve replacement in future.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2022

Indu Sharma and Vivek Tiwari

The purpose of this study is to review the literature on work–life interface (WLI) studies conducted in India, including how cultural and institutional factors affect the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the literature on work–life interface (WLI) studies conducted in India, including how cultural and institutional factors affect the work–life balance perception of Indian employees and how they differ from the west.

Design/methodology/approach

The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta analyses (PRISMA) framework was used to select studies included in this systematic review.

Findings

Employees in India prioritize their family first because of the collectivist culture as opposed to the west, where work forms the role of root identity. Further, it was found that institutional support in India is lower than in developed western countries, resulting in difficulty for Indian employees to balance their work and life domains. Additionally, methodological advancement and large-scale multilevel research are much needed in India, as research on work–life studies is still in its infancy.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to qualitative synthesis of PRISMA framework. Adopting more advanced “meta-analysis” techniques to review quantitative studies could result in more comprehensive and informative results.

Originality/value

Since 2009, there has been an increase in empirical studies conducted on work–life studies in India, but no systematic review has been conducted to understand the various theories and variables used by researchers. In this study, we developed a conceptual model to increase the theoretical knowledge of WLI constructs.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

1 – 10 of 249