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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

P. Robert Philp, Paula J. Haynes and Marilyn M. Helms

Companies cannot realize their growth and profit objectives if theyfail to fine‐tune their offerings to the needs of neglected marketsegments. Because market penetration…

Abstract

Companies cannot realize their growth and profit objectives if they fail to fine‐tune their offerings to the needs of neglected market segments. Because market penetration is the least expensive growth strategy, increased efforts directed towards existing customers are on target, but often key implementation activities have been amiss. Some companies have lost sight of the basic tenet of the marketing concept – failing to understand their customers′ unmet needs. Such firms may think they know their customers so well they can simply increase their offerings without examining the unique needs of various customer subsegments. In the retail financial service industry, providers have implemented growth strategies by focusing on their current customer base, which included women and customers over 50 years of age. However, providers failed to recognize the value of these subsegments and did not develop specific tactics to address their financial perceptions and needs. The increased importance of women as financial decision makers along with the proportion of financial assets controlled by consumers over 50 years of age are critical to future growth for the financial services industry. Outlines strategic guidelines for capitalizing on these profitable subsegments and examines implications for organizations which have failed to fine‐tune their strategies.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2015

J. Daniel Hammond

This paper compares the contexts of the writing of T. R. Malthus’s first edition of An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798); its reception by William Godwin, to…

Abstract

This paper compares the contexts of the writing of T. R. Malthus’s first edition of An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798); its reception by William Godwin, to whom the Essay was addressed; its interpretation by naturalists Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace; and its interpretation by modern commentators Kenneth Boulding and A. M. C. Waterman. The analysis helps explain how an essay that was written to defend social and economic institutions from critiques in utopian visions associated with the French Revolution came to be regarded as a model predicting overpopulation and exhaustion of natural resources.

Details

A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-857-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Michael Clark, Michelle Cornes, Jill Manthorpe, Catherine Hennessy and Sarah Anderson

The purpose of this paper is to discuss “system transformation” in the context of different workforces and organisations seeking to support people experiencing multiple…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss “system transformation” in the context of different workforces and organisations seeking to support people experiencing multiple exclusion homelessness (MEH). From a relational and integrated care perspective it aims to identify barriers to achieving more effective ways of working in the prevailing context of “managerial domination”. Communities of practice (COPs) are evaluated to identify their potential to overcome some of these barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a theoretical and conceptual discussion of a project in which a number of COPs were established and evaluated to ascertain their value in developing more relational ways of working in the context of MEH. Case studies of COPs operating in the context of MEH are explored and discussed.

Findings

It is concluded that COPs have the potential to deliver small-scale changes (“little miracles”) which are characteristically more subversive than transformative. Nevertheless, the authors still see these small gains as significant when compared to the inertia that is often found in local systems of care where more traditional management techniques (such as “payment by results”) prevail. The authors also draw attention to the scope for much improved service quality which flows from moving beyond the “tick box” and into the realms of what it really takes to tackle homelessness and multiple exclusion. In other words, although often requiring considerable amounts of “craft and graft” to deliver seemingly very small amounts of change, these “little miracles” may actually be more conducive in the long run to delivering the kind of tangible “real” change that is often aspired to by both workers and service users and their carers.

Research limitations/implications

The COPs project was limited in terms of time and scale and, hence, further research would be needed to, for example, ascertain their longer-term potential.

Practical implications

There is merit in the theoretical perspectives discussed and, from these, of understanding how best to establish and operate COPs as a vehicle for achieving better outcomes through integrated or collaborative working.

Social implications

There is much scope for better integrated or more collaborative working in the context of MEH and this paper draws attention to how COPs could be one means of achieving better outcomes for people experiencing MEH.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to set out the theoretical analysis of COPs as a means of achieving better integrated or collaborative working.

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Sue Middleton

In the early 1840s Edward Gibbon Wakefield's New Zealand Company recruited “emigrants of the labouring classes” promising: “every one of them who is industrious and…

Abstract

Purpose

In the early 1840s Edward Gibbon Wakefield's New Zealand Company recruited “emigrants of the labouring classes” promising: “every one of them who is industrious and thrifty, may be sure to become not merely an owner of land, but also in his turn an employer of hired labourers, a master of servants.” Letters sent “Home” to Ham (a village in Surrey, UK) from Wellington between 1841‐1844, by a group of labouring families, project textual personae consistent with this liberal image. The purpose of this paper is to explore educational processes involved in the production of these colonial identities.

Design/methodology/approach

The letters are read in relation to archival resources: the curriculum of the National School and alternative educational models in Ham, records of schools provided in Wellington, and pedagogical intentions signalled in the records of the New Zealand Company.

Findings

Arguing that migration resulted in a radical change in the subjectivity of these labouring class families, this paper contrasts the curricula of the “National School” attended by these children in Ham with the more secular offerings in Wellington. Their “National School” taught Ham's lower orders to accept their God‐given “stations” in life. Radical critique was suppressed. In Wellington the first schools, such as the Mechanics’ Institute, were non‐denominational, prioritising practical knowledge. Foundations for a secular society based on liberal values were laid.

Originality/value

There is little educational research on how participation in the Wakefield scheme transformed those who, in rural England, were required to remain subservient members of the power orders, into the enterprising independent subjects required in the new colony.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Bradley Bowden

Are business outcomes due primarily to entrepreneurial and managerial ability or are they mainly the result of business content? The purpose of this study is to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

Are business outcomes due primarily to entrepreneurial and managerial ability or are they mainly the result of business content? The purpose of this study is to explore this question by comparing the railroads of Victoria and Queensland (Australia) and the South-West and Northern Plains of America between 1881 and 1900. Given the commonalities of the four railway systems in terms of their economic orientation towards rural custom, and their marked difference in terms of ownership, one would expect similarities in their financial circumstances if outcomes were primarily determined by fluctuations in global commodity markets. Conversely, marked differences would be expected if outcomes primarily resulted from managerial initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptually, this study is informed by the idea that social and economic outcomes are shaped by long historical movements, with meaningful structural change occurring rarely but to great effect. In exploring this concept through a comparison of the railways of Australia and the American West, the study draws on two forms of archival evidence. One source of evidence relates to railroad management, operations and finances. Figures cited come primarily from Australian railway commissioners’ reports and Poor’s Manual of the Railroads of the USA. The other source of evidence relates to agricultural statistics. These are drawn from official reports.

Findings

This study argues that effective strategic decision-making can only occur if we understand the structural changes that alter our world. In the late nineteenth century, the Australian and American railroads servicing newly settled rural regions were financial failures because management failed to appreciate the structural changes that the revolution in steam-powered transport had initiated; a revolution which resulted in commodity prices – and hence, the railway rates for farm produce – being determined by global demand and supply balances rather than by local factors. As a result, they continued a policy of expansion that was no longer financially justified.

Originality/value

This study seeks to contribute to a fundamental debate in historical studies and management about the drivers of social and economic change. Increasingly, there is acceptance of the view that historical circumstances are inherently unstable and what counts is the particular change cascading through a myriad of “events”. This study points in a contrary direction, suggesting that business outcomes are primarily determined by deep structural shifts that can be understood and steered but seldom opposed.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Phil Mullan

Abstract

Details

Beyond Confrontation: Globalists, Nationalists and Their Discontents
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-560-6

Book part
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Peter Robbins

In today’s hypercompetitive, digital-first, knowledge-based economy, organizational creativity has never been more important as a potential source of competitive…

Abstract

In today’s hypercompetitive, digital-first, knowledge-based economy, organizational creativity has never been more important as a potential source of competitive advantage. The foundation stone for every innovation is an idea and all ideas are born of creativity. The innovation process thus starts with creativity and the new ideas it yields are ideally based on insights that will lead ultimately to novel outcomes (such as new products, services, experiences or business models) and thereby to a sustainable competitive advantage. In established businesses, until relatively recently, creativity was called on only for specific, often high-profile occasions, for ‘hackathons’ or for major ‘innovation jams’, but today it is an essential, everyday necessity of routine work. However, attaining the right level of creativity from within is a challenge for many organizations and so they need to establish an appropriate and effective way to import it into their teams, projects and, ultimately, culture. The arts are a pure, unadulterated form of creativity. Mindsets, processes and practices from the arts can give organizational creativity a significant boost and can potentially offset the creative deficit in an organization. Here, the illustrative cases and practices that demonstrate how the arts can have a positive impact on business are examined.

Details

Innovation and the Arts: The Value of Humanities Studies for Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-886-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Lorne S. Cummings and Roger L. Burritt

To attract funding from ethical investment trusts, it is expected that investee companies will need to undertake corporate social disclosure (CSD) in annual reports. This…

Abstract

To attract funding from ethical investment trusts, it is expected that investee companies will need to undertake corporate social disclosure (CSD) in annual reports. This paper first explores the notion that companies included within the portfolio of ethical investment trusts (ETIs), are likely to provide a greater quantity of CSD than companies in which ethical trusts have not invested (NETIs). Second, the paper examines the characteristics of companies that undertake CSD, and their relationship to the ETI/NETI classification. Results from the examination of a sample of 300 Australian annual reports for 147 companies over a five‐year period (1990–1994), indicate that CSD is related to size, industry visibility, and company presence in both foreign countries and foreign stock exchanges. The significance of this paper, in addition to building upon empirical research into CSD, is that, in a range of circumstances, companies with an ethical investor as a shareholder, provide greater transparency about their social and environmental activities, than companies without an ethical investor. As a result, case can be made for the direct regulation and monitoring of ETI companies to be reduced, relative to NETIs, given that ethical investment may fulfil a market based regulatory function.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Alison Culverwell, Alisoun Milne, Reinhard Guss and Jackie Tuppen

Despite evidence that early identification of dementia is of growing policy and practice significance in the UK, limited work has been done on evaluating screening…

Abstract

Despite evidence that early identification of dementia is of growing policy and practice significance in the UK, limited work has been done on evaluating screening measures for use in primary care. The aim of this paper is to offer a clinically informed synthesis of research and practice‐based evidence on the utility, efficacy and quality of dementia screening measures. The study has three elements: a review of research literature; a small‐scale survey of measures employed in three primary care trusts; and a systematic clinical evaluation of the most commonly used screening instruments. The authors integrated data from research and clinical sources. The General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition (GPCOG), Memory Impairment Screen (MIS) and Mini‐Cognitive Assessment Instrument (Mini‐Cog) were found to be: brief; easy to administer; clinically acceptable; effective; minimally affected by education, gender, and ethnicity; and to have psychometric properties similar to the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Although the MMSE is widely used in the UK, this project identifies the GPCOG, MIS and Mini‐Cog as more appropriate for routine use in primary care. A coherent review of evidence coupled with an in‐depth evaluation of screening instruments has the potential to enhance ability and commitment to early intervention in primary care and, as part of a wider educational strategy, improve the quality and consistency of dementia screening.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Thomas A. Lee

Reports on the role of UK emigrants to the USA in the creation and early development of its public accountancy profession. Explains findings in the context of US public…

1190

Abstract

Reports on the role of UK emigrants to the USA in the creation and early development of its public accountancy profession. Explains findings in the context of US public accountancy firms founded by UK immigrants and focuses on the recruitment of qualified and unqualified public accountants from the UK. The study is based on searches of relevant archives in the UK and USA. The evidence reveals UK immigrants played a substantial part in the formation and early development of both public accountancy firms and institutions in the USA. However, the recruitment of immigrants by US firms appears to have been a temporary phenomenon pending the supply of US‐born accountants with suitable training and experience. The firms examined include local and national firms. Subject to data retrieval limitations, a major conclusion of the study is that unqualified immigrants played significant roles in the early histories of firms and institutions of US public accountancy.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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