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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

P. Destounis, J. Garofalakis, P. Kappos and J. Tzimas

Web traffic is doubling every year, according to recent global studies. The user needs more information from Web sites and wants to spend as little time for downloading as…

Abstract

Web traffic is doubling every year, according to recent global studies. The user needs more information from Web sites and wants to spend as little time for downloading as possible. Simultaneously, more Internet bandwidth is needed and all ISPs are trying to build high bandwidth networks. This paper presents a case study that calculates the reduction of the time needed for a Web page to be fully downloaded and delivered to the user. Presents a way to calculate the reduction of data transfer, bandwidth resources and response time when the HTTP/1.1’s compressing feature is enabled (either in plain hypertext files or the text output of CGI programs or dynamically generated pages). Measurements are taken from five popular Web sites in order to validate our statement for reduction in transfer time. The definition of the mean size of a Web page that commercial Web sites have is additionally in the scope of this paper.

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Internet Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

N Ben Fairweather and S Rogerson

This paper looks at citizen‐facing e‐government. It considers how the non‐discretionary nature of the citizen’s relationshipwith government makes citizen‐facing…

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557

Abstract

This paper looks at citizen‐facing e‐government. It considers how the non‐discretionary nature of the citizen’s relationship with government makes citizen‐facing e‐government different from business‐consumer e‐commerce. Combined with the moral basis of the state, the paper argues that there is an obligation for the state to set an example, which should affect the design of citizen‐facing e‐government, with design‐for‐all being an appropriate philosophy. Other consequences should include a preference for open standards and a wariness of unintentional endorsement of commercial products. E‐government should also offer a good level of data protection and security, and has a role in educating citizens in matters of computer security. Advantages and disadvantages that may come from e‐government adoption are considered, including a number of ways in which cost savings and increases in convenience may be achieved. There are brief discussions of questions of distribution of the benefits of e‐government adoption and of the relationship of e‐government to e‐democracy.

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Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Panagiotis Destounis, John Garofalakis, George Mavritsakis, Maria Rigou, Spiros Sirmakessis and Giannis Tzimas

Aims to present the work done in the development of a simplified office suite for disabled and focus on the use of technology applied to the area of “designing for all”…

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1198

Abstract

Aims to present the work done in the development of a simplified office suite for disabled and focus on the use of technology applied to the area of “designing for all”. The paper presents an overview of the state‐of‐the‐art in the design for all. It provides practical references to techniques used. The main scope of the paper is to explore the developed technology and give details for the adopted mechanisms. It provides information about designing and implementing software applications for disabled and present a case study for mentally disabled. The paper presents a system that can be used by a specific target group. For this reason, it should be used as reference point for this group, although several techniques can be used for other user categories. The paper is a very useful presentation of an actual system that has been designed and implemented to cover the needs of disabled, useful for interaction with designers and researchers in assistive technology, and it fulfils the need for demonstrative technology in the area of designing for all.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Rebecca Mgunda Majinge and Stephen Mudogo Mutula

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the implication of copyright on access to electronic and print information resources by people with visual impairments in…

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1259

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the implication of copyright on access to electronic and print information resources by people with visual impairments in university libraries. The paper examines the extent to which electronic and print information resources in university libraries are accessible to people with visual impairments; the extent to which existing national/international copyright laws facilitate or hamper access to electronic and print information resources by people with visual impairments; examine challenges facing people with visual impairments in accessing electronic and print information resources; and how these challenges can be ameliorated.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on review of empirical and theoretical literature and is underpinned by Oliver’s (1990) social model of disability.

Findings

The findings reveal that many university libraries the world over lack the capacity to offer an effective information service to people with visual impairments. Furthermore, the stringent copyright laws and licensing regimes for purchasing or transcribing content from one format to another make provision of information services to people with visual impairments difficult. In-university libraries are faced with various challenges in accessing electronic and print information that include among others copyright and licensing restrictions, and system design issues. Assistive technologies (ATs), enabling policies, skilled staff and facilitative copyright regimes can help ameliorate some of these barriers.

Practical implications

ATs, enabling policies, skilled staff and facilitative copyright regimes are key to unlocking the barriers that hinder people with visual impairments from effectively accessing print and electronic resources in university libraries. Protection of the basic rights of persons with disabilities including visual impairments, the elimination of social discrimination and bridging the accessibility gap are integral to social inclusion. This paper provides the basic information to university libraries for addressing challenges associated with access to electronic and print resources by people with visual impairments.

Social implications

Access to information to all including people with visual impairments in society is a basic human and moral right that every human being must enjoy. The Sustainable Development Goals’ 2030 agenda for sustainable development envisages a world of universal respect for human rights and human dignity […] equality and non-discrimination, an equitable, tolerant, open and socially inclusive world in which the needs of the most vulnerable are met (United Nations, 2015), and inclusive rights such as education, access to services (including information) and employment for people with disabilities.

Originality/value

This paper builds on existing literature and contributes to the growing body of knowledge on access by people with disabilities predicating on World Summit on Information Society principle and agenda 2030 on sustainable development goals.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 6-7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Gerard Ryan and Mireia Valverde

Although waiting on the Internet is widely recognised as a crucial factor in the evolution of e‐commerce and the Internet in general, it is not a widespread topic of…

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1592

Abstract

Although waiting on the Internet is widely recognised as a crucial factor in the evolution of e‐commerce and the Internet in general, it is not a widespread topic of research. This article identifies and reviews 21 papers based on 13 separate empirical studies on waiting on the Internet. The literature draws from the areas of marketing, system response time studies and quality of service studies. Having reviewed the existing literature, this article proposes an agenda for future research. Recommendations are made to extend the range of research methodologies applied to this topic, to broaden the definition of waiting on the Internet to include other forms of online waiting, and to continue the interdisciplinary approach to research on online waiting.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Edgar A. Whitley and Eleanor Wynn

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246

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Lee Fergusson, Luke van der Laan, Bradley Shallies and Matthew Baird

This paper examines the relationship between work, resilience and sustainable futures for organisations and communities by considering the nature of work-related problems…

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1412

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the relationship between work, resilience and sustainable futures for organisations and communities by considering the nature of work-related problems (WRPs) and the work-based research designed to investigate them. The authors explore the axis of work environment > work-related problem > resilience > sustainable futures as it might be impacted by work-based research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces two current real-world examples, one in Australia and one in Asia, of work-based research projects associated with higher education aimed at promoting resilience and sustainability, and discusses the research problems, questions, designs, methods, resilience markers and sustainability markers used by these projects.

Findings

Work-based research, when conducted rigorously using mixed methods, may contribute to increased resilience of organisations and communities and thereby seeks to promote more sustainable organisational and social futures.

Practical implications

Work-based research conducted in higher education seeks to investigate, address and solve WRP, even when such problems occur in unstable, changing, complex and messy environments.

Social implications

Resilience and sustainable futures are ambiguous and disputed terms, but if work-based research can be brought to bear on them, organisations and communities might better adapt and recover from challenging situations, thus reducing their susceptibility to shock and adversity.

Originality/value

While resilience and sustainability are commonly referred to in the research literature, their association to work, and specifically problems associated with work, have yet to be examined. This paper goes some of the way to addressing this need.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Magdalena Wójcik

The subject of the article is the concept of augmented intelligence, which constitutes a further stage in the development of research on artificial intelligence. This is a…

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3050

Abstract

Purpose

The subject of the article is the concept of augmented intelligence, which constitutes a further stage in the development of research on artificial intelligence. This is a new phenomenon that has rarely been considered in the subject literature so far, which may be interesting for the fields of social sciences and humanities. The aim is to describe the features of this technology and determine the practical and ethical problems associated with its implementation in libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of literature review was used. Systematic searches according to specific questions were carried out using the Scopus and Web of Science scientific databases, as well as Google Scholar and the LISTA abstract database.

Findings

The results established that the issue of augmented intelligence has barely been discussed in the field of librarianship. Although this technology may be interesting as a new area of librarian research and as a new framework for designing innovative services, deep ethical consideration is necessary before this technology is introduced in libraries.

Research limitations/implications

The article deals with some of the newest technologies available, and this topic is generally very rarely discussed in scientific publications in either the social sciences or humanities. Therefore, due to the limited availability of materials, the findings presented in the article are primarily of a conceptual nature. The aim is to present this topic from the perspective of librarianship and to create a starting point for further discussion on the ethical aspects of introducing new technologies in libraries.

Practical implications

The results can be widely used in practice as a framework for the implementation of augmented intelligence in libraries.

Social implications

The article can help to facilitate the debate on the role of implementing new technologies in libraries.

Originality/value

The problem of augmented intelligence is very rarely addressed in the subject literature in the field of library and information science.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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