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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2018

Kwame Owusu Kwateng, Kenneth Afo Osei Atiemo and Charity Appiah

Mobile banking (m-banking) can be defined as a service offered by a bank or any other financial institution that allows the customers of such establishments to carry out a…

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Abstract

Purpose

Mobile banking (m-banking) can be defined as a service offered by a bank or any other financial institution that allows the customers of such establishments to carry out a variety of banking operations via a mobile device, such as a mobile phone, tablet or personal digital assistant. The purpose of this paper is to examine factors that influence customers to adopt and subsequently use m-banking services in Ghana using the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology 2 (UTAUT2) model with age, educational level, user experience and gender as moderators.

Design/methodology/approach

Using questionnaire survey, the study sampled 300 users of m-banking services in Ghana as respondents. The primary data collected were analyzed using SmartPLS software.

Findings

Findings of the study indicate that Habit, Price Value and Trust are the main factors influencing adoption and use of m-banking in Ghana. Individual differences of gender, age, educational level and user experience responded differently as they moderate the relationship between UTAUT2 constructs and use bahaviour. The applicability of UTAUT2 model was confirmed in the context of the research.

Practical implications

M-banking is a new phenomenon in Ghana’s financial industry, thus it is imperative to understanding the customer adoption behavior. The outcome will aid financial institutions to develop strategies that will sustain the interest of consumers to embrace m-banking.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first ever known attempts to examine m-banking adoption in Ghana using UTAUT2 model.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Khatai Aliyev, Javid Seyfullali, Narmin Saidova, Tural Musayev and Farzali Nuhiyev

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of females' likelihood to work in a Muslim society, Azerbaijan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of females' likelihood to work in a Muslim society, Azerbaijan.

Design/methodology/approach

To obtain more precise results, the authors analyze the relationships of interest in three different contexts: single (unmarried) females (n = 407, M = 0.779, Std. = 0.416), married female (n = 398, M = 0.706, SD = 0.456) and married male (n = 381, M = 0.378, Std. = 0.485). Linear probabilistic models and logistic regression techniques are employed to estimate regression parameters.

Findings

The results altogether display a strong positive impact of the educational attainment of both females and married males. Between the income of married males' and females' employment likelihood, nonlinear – inverse U-shaped association is found. The findings indicate that conservatism towards females' employment is not religiously opinionated, mostly due to insufficient educational attainment.

Practical implications

Based on the research findings, inspiring individuals are recommended to attain degree level qualifications. Simultaneously, the government should engage in mass media to increase awareness of the public about the non-monetary benefits of female employment.

Originality/value

The research results are highly useful for policy practices and fill the huge gap in the studies and research made on the Azerbaijan labor market.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-09-2019-0557.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Lucy Taksa

Purpose – This chapter aims to show that attention to nicknaming as a form of language-making and sensemaking can provide a valuable avenue for exploring employees…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter aims to show that attention to nicknaming as a form of language-making and sensemaking can provide a valuable avenue for exploring employees’ assessments of (mis)behavior. It highlights the connection between gender and language-making as central to the way workers assess and respond to (mis)behavior in different workplaces.

Methodology – The chapter uses an historical perspective and concepts drawn from sociology and organizational theory. It identifies nicknames and nicknaming practices from a wide range of documentary sources and oral sources.

Findings – In considering nicknaming in terms of sensemaking and language-making rather than simply as a form of humor, the chapter shows that derogatory names enable employees to address the tensions and conflicts arising from formal organizational practices, rules, and managerial imperatives and workplace relations. It emphasizes commonalities in nicknaming practices that extend beyond the micro-level of specific workplaces and in doing so illustrates that nicknaming is not simply a manifestation of humor but as importantly of inter-subjective processes through which workers construct group identities to enforce co-produced informal rules of behavior.

Social implications – The chapter illustrates the importance of workplace nicknaming and its implications for the way employees try to influence the behavior of others by condoning and/or shaming those who conform to or defy informal rules.

Originality – The chapter's originality lies in its focus on employees’ own assessments of misbehavior and on commonalities in nicknaming practices in different times and in different places.

Details

Rethinking Misbehavior and Resistance in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-662-1

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Stephen Tetteh, Rebecca Dei Mensah, Christian Narh Opata and Gloria Nana Yaa Asirifua Agyapong

This study explicitly examines how Hofstede's cultural dimensions moderate the relationship between nonmonetary motivation factors and performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explicitly examines how Hofstede's cultural dimensions moderate the relationship between nonmonetary motivation factors and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the simple random sampling technique, the hypotheses were tested with a sample of 604 employees from a mobile telecommunication company operating in both China and Ghana, two countries that represent two same and opposite cultural poles on Hofstede's cultural dimensions.

Findings

The results point that employee motives such as relationship, supervision, challenging work and achievement are moderated by cultural values. Whilst employees with high power distance cultural values are highly motivated by high supervision, those with low individualistic cultural values are highly motivated by high relationship. The results also depict that whilst the interaction effects between supervision and power distance and relationship and individualism on performance were marginal for both China and Ghana samples, the interaction effect of achievement and masculinity as well as challenging work and uncertainty avoidance on performance had great differences due to the different cultural values for the two countries.

Practical implications

This study implies that, as organizations are devising strategies to lower personnel costs in a recessionary period, there is the need to redesign motivation factors that go beyond monetary means and based on the cultural background of an employee in order to improve performance.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that focused on nonmonetary motives from a cultural management perspective with samples from emerging economies.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Azizah Ahmad

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive…

Abstract

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive advantage provided by BI capability is not well researched. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for successful BI deployment and empirically examines the association between BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage. Taking the telecommunications industry in Malaysia as a case example, the research particularly focuses on the influencing perceptions held by telecommunications decision makers and executives on factors that impact successful BI deployment. The research further investigates the relationship between successful BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage of the telecommunications organizations. Another important aim of this study is to determine the effect of moderating factors such as organization culture, business strategy, and use of BI tools on BI deployment and the sustainability of firm’s competitive advantage.

This research uses combination of resource-based theory and diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory to examine BI success and its relationship with firm’s sustainability. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and a two-phase sequential mixed method consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches are employed. A tentative research model is developed first based on extensive literature review. The chapter presents a qualitative field study to fine tune the initial research model. Findings from the qualitative method are also used to develop measures and instruments for the next phase of quantitative method. The study includes a survey study with sample of business analysts and decision makers in telecommunications firms and is analyzed by partial least square-based structural equation modeling.

The findings reveal that some internal resources of the organizations such as BI governance and the perceptions of BI’s characteristics influence the successful deployment of BI. Organizations that practice good BI governance with strong moral and financial support from upper management have an opportunity to realize the dream of having successful BI initiatives in place. The scope of BI governance includes providing sufficient support and commitment in BI funding and implementation, laying out proper BI infrastructure and staffing and establishing a corporate-wide policy and procedures regarding BI. The perceptions about the characteristics of BI such as its relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, and observability are also significant in ensuring BI success. The most important results of this study indicated that with BI successfully deployed, executives would use the knowledge provided for their necessary actions in sustaining the organizations’ competitive advantage in terms of economics, social, and environmental issues.

This study contributes significantly to the existing literature that will assist future BI researchers especially in achieving sustainable competitive advantage. In particular, the model will help practitioners to consider the resources that they are likely to consider when deploying BI. Finally, the applications of this study can be extended through further adaptation in other industries and various geographic contexts.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-764-2

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2007

Kay Whitehead

Beginning with the introduction of mass compulsory schooling legislation in the 1870s, and using age and marital status as key categories of social difference, this…

Abstract

Beginning with the introduction of mass compulsory schooling legislation in the 1870s, and using age and marital status as key categories of social difference, this article provides an overview of issues surrounding the ‘woman teacher’ through to the postwar baby boom. It shows how women teachers were increasingly differentiated according to location (country and city) and level of schooling (kindergarten, primary and secondary), and it also casts them as somewhat threatening to the gender order. Firstly, the article describes the processes by which teaching in both city and country primary schools became normalised as single women or spinsters’ work with the advent of mass compulsory schooling. Part two focuses on the turn of the twentieth century, a period in which anxieties about single women, so many of whom were teachers, coalesced around the figure of the ‘new woman’. In this context I investigate what state school teaching might have meant for single women, be they unqualified ‘girl teachers’ in country schools or mature women whose qualifications and career paths brought them into city schools. The third section shows that the expansion of state schooling in the early twentieth century produced further differentiation of the ‘teacher’ as primary, kindergarten or secondary. Furthermore, in the interwar years new meanings of singleness for women were proposed by sexologists and psychologists, and spinster teachers became more stigmatised as women. Finally, I turn to the women who taught from the late 1930s into the postwar era.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Roy V. Paul, Kriparaj K.G. and Tide P.S.

The purpose of this study is to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of subsonic jet emanating from corrugated lobed nozzle.

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93

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of subsonic jet emanating from corrugated lobed nozzle.

Design/methodology/approach

Numerical simulations of subsonic turbulent jets from corrugated lobed nozzles using shear stress transport k-ω turbulence model have been carried out. The analysis was carried out by varying parameters such as lobe length, lobe penetration and lobe count at a Mach number of 0.75. The numerical predictions of axial and radial variation of the mean axial velocity, uu′ ¯ and vv′ ¯ have been compared with experimental results of conventional round and chevron nozzles reported in the literature.

Findings

The centreline velocity at the exit of the corrugated lobed nozzle was found to be lower than the velocity at the outer edges of the nozzle. The predicted potential core length is lesser than the experimental results of the conventional round nozzle and hence the decay in centreline velocity is faster. The centreline velocity increases with the increase in lobe length and becomes more uniform at the exit. The potential core length increases with the increase in lobe count and decreases with the increase in lobe penetration. The turbulent kinetic energy region is narrower with early appearance of a stronger peak for higher lobe penetration. The centreline velocity degrades much faster in the corrugated nozzle than the chevron nozzle and the peak value of Reynolds stress appears in the vicinity of the nozzle exit.

Practical implications

The corrugated lobed nozzles are used for enhancing mixing without the thrust penalty inducing better acoustic benefits.

Originality/value

The prominent features of the corrugated lobed nozzle were obtained from the extensive study of variation of flow characteristics for different lobe parameters after making comparison with round and chevron nozzle, which paved the way to the utilization of these nozzles for various applications.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 92 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Rafikul Islam and Ahmad Zaki Hj. Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to identify the motivating factors of employees working in various Malaysian organizations.

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24200

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the motivating factors of employees working in various Malaysian organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey method was adopted. The survey questionnaire consisted of two parts: respondents' personal information were obtained through Part A and in Part B, they were asked to rank the ten motivating factors in terms of their effectiveness. The motivating factors were compiled from the existing literature and refined through consultation with human resource professionals.

Findings

An ordered set of motivating factors for employees working in Malaysian organizations. Demographic factors like gender, race, education, etc. were found to have impact on the ranking of the factors.

Originality/value

The findings are expected to provide useful guidelines to managers while developing employee motivation programs.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Billy Wadongo, Edwin Odhuno, Oscar Kambona and Lucas Othuon

The overall purpose of this study is to investigate impact of managerial characteristics on key performance indicators in the Kenyan hotel industry.

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6474

Abstract

Purpose

The overall purpose of this study is to investigate impact of managerial characteristics on key performance indicators in the Kenyan hotel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional survey research design was used to gather primary data using self‐administered questionnaires. A sample of 160 hospitality managers was selected proportionately by simple random sample method from six hotels in Nairobi and Mombasa. A custom factorial univariate analysis of variance was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Hospitality managers in Kenya are still focusing on financial and result measures of performance while ignoring non‐financial and determinant measures. Managerial demographic characteristics; age, education, current position, functional area, and performance appraisal influence managers' choice of key performance indicators.

Research limitations/implications

The model violated assumptions of homogeneity of variances. Literature review revealed a severe lack of Kenyan‐based research in tourism and hospitality industries on performance measurement practices hence the need for future research in this area.

Practical implications

The hotels need to invest in comprehensive performance management systems suitable for Kenyan hospitality industry that will incorporate both financial and non‐financial performance measures.

Originality/value

The study focuses on level of use of performance indicators and level of importance attached to performance indicators in the Kenyan hospitality industry. Managerial demographic characteristics influence on key performance indicators are examined in leading service industry in a growing economy thus contributing to a new body of knowledge in management literature in Africa.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Amanda Carr, Gwen Gilmore and Marcelle Cacciattolo

The purpose of this paper is to discuss that in 2012, a small group of teaching staff in a new diploma of Education Studies program came together to critically reflect on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss that in 2012, a small group of teaching staff in a new diploma of Education Studies program came together to critically reflect on teaching approaches that either hindered or encouraged learners to thrive in the transition environment in higher education (HE).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the use of case writing as a methodological tool for engaging in reflexive inquiry in a HE cross-faculty setting; it also adds a further dimension to the work of (Burridge et al., 2010). The team used a systematic coding activity, known as “threading,” to unpack over-arching themes that were embedded in each other’s narratives.

Findings

Throughout the two years of the project, 12 cases were presented on key critical teaching moments that the researchers had experienced. The themes varied and included topics like student reflections on why they found learning challenging, teachers’ mixed emotions about failing students, difficulties for teachers in having to persuade students to read academic texts, teacher/student confrontations and student resilience amidst challenges linked to their personal and student lives.

Social implications

A central theme to emerge from the research was that complexities arise for teachers when they are faced with learners who are apparently not suited to the career pathway they have signed up for.

Originality/value

Through using a collaborative practitioner research framework, enunciating concerns were raised and different interpretations of the same incident were shared. The paper concludes that case writing can assist academics to be more informed of teaching approaches that lead to successful learning outcomes.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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