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Article

Paul Chynoweth

The purpose of the paper is to introduce a model for practice-informed research and to propose this as an alternative paradigm of enquiry, capable of satisfying the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to introduce a model for practice-informed research and to propose this as an alternative paradigm of enquiry, capable of satisfying the competing demands for research in the built environment to be both academically rigorous, and also relevant to practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is defined in terms of research whose primary purpose addresses the immediate needs of professional practice, rather than theoretical, policy or other academic concerns, and which also utilizes the researcher's experientially gained knowledge as a methodological device. The extent to which this model is capable of demonstrating the required degree of rigour demanded by the academic world is then evaluated through a review of relevant theoretical and methodological literature.

Findings

The model is seen to draw upon the Aristotlean notions of techne and phronesis, and to belong to a long epistemological and methodological tradition associated with the concept of knowledge in action. The relationship between this concept and that of tacit knowledge, as well as emic and ideographic approaches to research are demonstrated. The model is also seen to have particular resonances with recent developments in the arts and design disciplines, in qualitative social research and in aspects of the current discourse surrounding the emergence of the knowledge economy.

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates the academic legitimacy of the proposed model as an alternative research paradigm for use in a built environment context.

Practical implications

The model presents an approach that has the potential to increase the relevance of research, and to generate an increased level dialogue between academics and practitioners in the built environment field.

Originality/value

The paper places the concept of practice-informed research into the public domain for subsequent consideration and debate by members of the built environment research community. The concept's insider and practice-centric approaches distinguish it from earlier contributions to the relevance v. rigour debate. By drawing on a wide range of interdisciplinary sources the paper also offers new theoretical insights that have not previously been aired in a built environment context.

Details

Property Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article

Udayangani Kulatunga, Dilanthi Amaratunga and Richard Haigh

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of performance measurement (PM) within construction research and development (R&D) activities to enhance its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of performance measurement (PM) within construction research and development (R&D) activities to enhance its efficiency and effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature review is used as the methodology of this paper where it will look into two main areas. First, the paper discusses R&D work in construction industry with particular reference to its role, main contributors, and the issues which hinders its successfulness. From this section the paper arrives at a definition for construction R&D and the scope of the study. The second section of the paper defines PM and identifies the importance of it in general. Finally, the paper justifies how the issues within construction R&D could be minimised by implementing PM system.

Findings

The paper justifies the implementation of PM within construction R&D and identifies how PM could enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of construction R&D through: identifying requirements of the parties involved within the research process; defining clear aims and objectives; evaluation of the successfulness of activates/confirmation of milestones; providing information for the research funders regarding the utilisation of resources; improving the communication and coordination of the parties involved; and providing feedback for future improvements of the research work.

Originality/value

The paper reveals the impact and influence of PM towards the construction R&D activities.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 56 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part

Anton Lewis

The intention of this chapter is to examine race and racism in the accounting industry in the context of neutrality. Objectivity and impartiality minimize the space for…

Abstract

The intention of this chapter is to examine race and racism in the accounting industry in the context of neutrality. Objectivity and impartiality minimize the space for alternative voices, too often unheard from the margin, that speak of a differing racialized professional existence for the Black accountant. A Critical Race Theory (CRT) of accountancy is called for among a number of takes in the genre of Critical Accounting to begin a process of unpacking systemic processes within the profession, which encourage homogeneity and exclusion.

Belief in professional colorblindness as impartiality where race is concerned is critiqued as a tool of domination that fosters injustice because it hides racism from the institution while simultaneously allowing racist practice to go unchallenged.

Details

Accounting in Conflict: Globalization, Gender, Race and Class
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-976-3

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Article

Salim Moussa and Mourad Touzani

This article aims to: conceptualize customer‐service firm attachment; as well as to propose a theoretical framework that provides insights into the formation and…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to: conceptualize customer‐service firm attachment; as well as to propose a theoretical framework that provides insights into the formation and development of affectionate ties in customer‐service firm relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Toward these two goals, the authors integrate conclusions from a multidisciplinary literature that covers attachment theory, brand attachment, and place attachment.

Findings

The authors formally define customer‐service firm attachment as the emotional bond connecting a customer with a service firm. They offer a conceptual framework that assumes that customer satisfaction, service quality, customer trust towards the service firm and its personnel, customer‐firm image congruence, and positive emotions felt during the service experience are the main drivers of customer‐service firm attachment.

Research limitations/implications

Notwithstanding the fact that this article remains conceptual in spirit, it provides several theoretical and managerial implications.

Originality/value

This article reviews and merges the latest insights from diverse attachment theories and concepts in diverse disciplines (i.e. social psychology, environmental psychology, leisure science, consumer behavior, and marketing). It also presents attachment styles as a new consumer segmenting criteria.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Book part

Sheng Wang, David B. Greenberger, Raymond A. Noe and Jinyan Fan

This chapter discusses how attachment theory, a theory that provides insight into the processes through which psychological and emotional bonds are developed in…

Abstract

This chapter discusses how attachment theory, a theory that provides insight into the processes through which psychological and emotional bonds are developed in relationships, can be useful for understanding mentoring relationships. We develop a conceptual model emphasizing how attachment-related constructs and their relationships with mentors’ and protégés’ behaviors and emotions influence each phase of a mentoring relationship. Recognizing reciprocity in the mentoring process, the model also explains how the interpersonal dynamics of the mentor–protégé relationship influence the benefits gained by both partners. Propositions for future research on mentoring relationships are provided. We contend that examining mentoring through the lens of attachment theory can increase our understanding of the underlying factors or mechanisms that determine individuals’ involvement in mentoring relationships and differentiate successful from unsuccessful mentoring relationships. The research and practical implications are discussed.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Article

Antti Tuomela

Centralised workplace and decentralised facilities management organisations combine several interacting functions. The purpose of this paper is to examine the workplace…

Abstract

Centralised workplace and decentralised facilities management organisations combine several interacting functions. The purpose of this paper is to examine the workplace service environment from a ‘network organisation’ perspective comprising workplace knowledge‐holder roles that have both formal and informal connections. This paper proposes that the core business customers, in‐house and outsourced service providers, and the contract managers have a similar need to interact and learn from each other and presents a framework for ‘network service organisations’ to describe their changing collaborative roles. First, the customer interfaces of workplace networks are identified. Secondly, a theoretical framework for a network service organisation is presented, followed by a section on creating centres of excellence for workplace knowledge. Thirdly, a generic governance model for network collaboration is introduced. The aim of the paper is to increase knowledge about understanding and managing network relations in the new workplace environment. The paper ends with a discussion on limitations to formal cooperation and the need for further research on informal relationships within these networks.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article

Sandra Jones

This paper argues that a new theory of community industrial relations is needed that recognises fewer boundaries between work and family. The theory needs to recognise a…

Abstract

This paper argues that a new theory of community industrial relations is needed that recognises fewer boundaries between work and family. The theory needs to recognise a mutual exchange between the traditional “actors” in the industrial relationship (unions, employers and the government) and “interactors” in the community rather than continue to assume a separation between the external and internal industrial environment that has underpinned traditional industrial relations theory. More importantly the theory needs to be gender inclusive and recognise the important role played by women as a link between industrial actors and the community. The paper presents examples of community‐union activity to illustrate the reality of the decrease in separation between community and industrial parties. In so doing the paper draws on the experiences of female partners of male unionists in traditional male workplaces. The paper proposes a new gender inclusive model of community industrial relations. Based on this model the paper proposes a new theory of community industrial relations in which interchange occurs between the traditional industrial relations actors and various groups of interactors within the community within the broader social/cultural, economic, political, and legal environment, for mutual advantage of all parties. This theory is in its formative stage and this requires further testing before it can be claimed as a general theory.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Fabian Maximilian Johannes Teichmann

Whilst the existing literature focuses on developing prevention mechanisms for banks, this paper aims to show how feasible it still is in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein…

Abstract

Purpose

Whilst the existing literature focuses on developing prevention mechanisms for banks, this paper aims to show how feasible it still is in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein and Switzerland to finance terrorism without getting detected.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-step research process, including both qualitative and quantitative methods, was applied. The empirical findings are based upon qualitative content analysis of 15 informal interviews with illegal financial services providers and 15 formal interviews with compliance experts and law enforcement officers.

Findings

During those interviews, concrete and specific methods of financing terrorism and limiting the risks of facing a criminal prosecution were discussed. The interviews were analyzed based upon a qualitative content analysis. To assess the risk, which criminals, a quantitative survey among 181 compliance officers was conducted to determine what leads to investigations.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to the 30 interviewees’ and 181 survey participants’ perspective.

Practical implications

The practical implications include suggestions for providing law enforcement and intelligence agencies with new tools, such as remote online searches of electronic devices.

Originality/value

Whilst the empirical findings are based upon Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein and Switzerland, the results could be applied on European level.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article

Peter Barrett and Lucinda Barrett

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the key characteristics of the highest‐performing construction projects, so that future procurement, briefing, design and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the key characteristics of the highest‐performing construction projects, so that future procurement, briefing, design and construction management processes can be improved in the light of these experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Workshops were carried out in Australia, Singapore and the USA involving 40 senior participants, representing a good cross‐section of the stakeholder interests around construction. These individuals were each asked to identify the best construction project with which they had been involved at any point in their careers and to identify the major reasons for its success.

Findings

A synthesis is provided of the characteristics that characterise the exemplary projects cited by the workshop participants. These are typified by the “4Cs”, namely constraints driving collaboration and creativity, ideally leading to community benefits. The 17 exemplars provided by the participants show project teams facing demands that act to break the dysfunctional paradigm of normal practice, so allowing refreshing and motivating actions to follow. This schema is reinforced by the three case study vignettes that illustrate in more detail the factors at work and their interactions. Linkage to prominent issues apparent in the literatures related to procurement, briefing, design and construction management are shown, together with pointers as to the connections between these issues as experienced in specific real world, project situations. In particular, the potentially pervasive impact of selective priority‐setting is highlighted.

Practical implications

This paper provides a glimpse of how construction operates at its best, the industry explicitly contributing to, and getting credit for, adding value to society economically, but also culturally, socially and environmentally.

Originality/value

The work reported on here covers 17 mini‐cases and three fuller cases, all drawn from three countries. Further work to build additional cases from a wider range of countries would test the broad outline of the 4Cs model and increase one's understanding of the dynamic mechanisms at work.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

Brad Potter

In recent years in Australia, accounting regulations have been developed that require the adoption of commercial accounting and reporting practices by public‐sector…

Abstract

In recent years in Australia, accounting regulations have been developed that require the adoption of commercial accounting and reporting practices by public‐sector organisations, including the recognition of cultural, heritage and scientific collections as assets by non‐profit cultural organisations. The regulations inappropriately apply traditional accounting concepts of accountability and performance, notwithstanding that the primary objectives of many of the organisations affected are not financial. This study examines how this was able to occur within the ideas outlined in Douglas’s (1986) How Institutions Think. The study provides evidence to demonstrate that the development; promotion, and defense of the detailed accounting regulations were each constrained by institutional thinking and, as a result, only certain questions were asked and many problems and issues associated with the regulations were not addressed. Thus, it seeks to further our understanding of the nature and limits of change in accounting and the role of institutions in promoting and defending changes to accounting practice.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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