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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Jose Igor Hleap-Zapata and Gloria Carmenza Rodríguez-de-la-Pava

The purpose of this article was to study the influence of oyster mushroom powder (Pleurotus ostreatus) as a partial substitute for sodium pyrophosphate in frankfurters…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article was to study the influence of oyster mushroom powder (Pleurotus ostreatus) as a partial substitute for sodium pyrophosphate in frankfurters made from red tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) fillets.

Design/methodology/approach

This study looks at adding oyster mushroom powder (OMP) to the emulsion at concentrations of 0, 0.075, 0.150, 0.225 and 0.300% (p/p) in combination with sodium pyrophosphate (PS), which was added at concentrations of 0.225, 0.150, 0.075 and 0%, respectively. A sausage with only sodium pyrophosphate added was evaluated as the control sample. The proximal chemical composition, physicochemical parameters, color, texture, lipid oxidation and sensory characteristics were determined for each treatment.

Findings

The results revealed that adding OMP up to 0.150% (w/w) provided the best conditions for the sausages in terms of pH, lipid oxidation, moisture retention capacity and cooking losses. In addition, the characteristics of texture and color, as well as the sensory evaluation, showed the best values for this OMP and SP ratio, meaning a substitution of sodium pyrophosphate with oyster mushroom powder at this concentration is suitable.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the beneficial properties of oyster mushroom powder, thereby showing potential for the establishment of health-promoting effects of the fish sausages.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2022

Muneeb Ahmad Malik, Yasmeena Jan, Afrozul Haq, Jasmeet Kaur and Bibhu Prasad Panda

The purpose of this study was to optimize the parameters for enhancing the vitamin D2 formation in three edible mushroom varieties, namely, shiitake mushroom (Lentinula

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to optimize the parameters for enhancing the vitamin D2 formation in three edible mushroom varieties, namely, shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes), white button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) and oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation.

Design/methodology/approach

Freshly harvested mushrooms were irradiated with UV-B and UV-C lamps. Further, mushrooms were treated with UV-B at a distance ranging between 10 and 50 cm from the UV light source, for 15–150 min, to maximize the conversion of ergosterol to vitamin D2. Analysis of vitamin D2 content in mushrooms before and after UV exposure was done by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC).

Findings

HPLC results showed a significant (p < 0.001) increase in vitamin D2 levels of shiitake (17.3 ± 0.35 µg/g), button (24.9 ± 0.71 µg/g) and oyster (19.1 ± 0.35 µg/g) mushrooms, irradiated with UV-B at a distance of 20–30 cm for 120 min. Further, stability studies revealed that vitamin D2 levels in UV-B-irradiated mushrooms gradually increased for 48 and 72 h of storage at room and refrigeration temperatures, respectively. During cooking operations, 62%–93% of vitamin D2 was retained in UV-B-irradiated mushrooms.

Originality/value

This study describes the most effective parameters such as ideal wavelength, mushrooms size, duration of exposure and distance from UV sources for maximum vitamin D2 formation in edible mushrooms using UV irradiation. Further, assessment of vitamin D2 stability in UV exposed mushrooms during storage period and cooking operations has been carried out. In addition, this study also provides a comparison of the vitamin D2 levels of the three widely cultivated and consumed mushroom varieties treated simultaneously under similar UV exposure conditions.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 52 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Wan Abd Al Qadr Imad Wan-Mohtar, Anita Klaus, Acga Cheng, Shardana Aiga Salis and Sarina Abdul Halim-Lim

The purpose of this paper is to identify the strain of oyster mushroom (OM) Pleurotus sapidus cultivated in a local (commercial) farm, and to generate a total quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the strain of oyster mushroom (OM) Pleurotus sapidus cultivated in a local (commercial) farm, and to generate a total quality index (TQI) on the strain using different modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) gas mixtures.

Design/methodology/approach

A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the MEGA software to identify the specific strain of P. sapidus grown in a local farm. The effects of MAP on fresh fruiting bodies of the identified strain were determined under three conditions: high carbon dioxide packaging (HCP: 20 per cent CO2, 15 per cent O2), low carbon dioxide packaging (LCP: 2 per cent CO2, 30 per cent O2) and high nitrogen packaging (HNP: 85 per cent N2, 15 per cent O2). All samples were stored at 4 oC for up to ten days, and subjected to total phenolic content (TPC), colour retention (CR) and sensory analysis. Quality parameters such as chewiness and odour were used to obtain the TQI.

Findings

From the phylogenetic analysis, a new strain (P. sapidus strain QDR) with 99 per cent similarity to P. sapidus was identified. Among the three MAP treatments, HCP recorded the highest TPC (2.85 mg GAE/g) and CR (60.36) after ten days, although only its CR was significantly different (p<0.05) from the control. Feedback from 30 sensory panellists indicated that both HCP and LCP were generally more effective in retaining the colour–odour of OM. The optimum TQI for HCP was obtained based on the observed parameters, which is useful for the large-scale packaging of OM.

Originality/value

Scientific evidence has revealed that packaging trend for commercially grown OM affects consumer’s acceptance.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

V. Dunkwal, S. Jood and S. Singh

This article aims to focus on the food value of the mushroom. Because of its low calorific value and very high content of proteins, vitamins and minerals, mushrooms may…

1006

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to focus on the food value of the mushroom. Because of its low calorific value and very high content of proteins, vitamins and minerals, mushrooms may contribute significantly in overcoming protein deficiency in developing countries like India.

Design/methodology/approach

Oyster (Pleurotus sajor caju) mushroom cultivated on two substrates i.e. wheat straw and brassica straw were procured. Freshly harvested and washed mushrooms were cut into small pieces. Sliced mushrooms were divided into four portions. Two portions were left untreated and dried using sun and oven drying methods. The third portion was blanched in boiling water at 100 °C for two mins, cooled immediately and drained. The blanched samples were divided into two portions. One portion was sun dried and another was oven dried. The fourth portion was soaked in solution of citric acid (0.25 percent) for 30 mins and drained. The steeped samples were divided into two portions. One portion was sun dried and another was oven dried. Each sample was dried from initial moisture content of 91 percent on fresh weight basis of the final moisture content 10 percent on dry weight basis. All the samples were ground to make fine powder. The untreated and treated samples were analysed for physico‐chemical properties and sensory evaluation by using standard methods.

Findings

Treated and untreated powders prepared from oyster (Pleurotus sajor caju) mushrooms grown on two substrates i.e. wheat and brassica straw were analysed for physical and chemical characteristics. Among the powders, T6 (steeped in 0.25 percent citric acid and oven dried) powder exhibited highest yield followed by untreated and blanched powders. On the other hand, untreated samples T1 (sun dried) and T4 (oven dried) showed higher browning index as compared to pretreated powders. Steeped samples (T3 and T6) from both type of mushrooms, irrespective of drying methods exhibited higher values of water retention capacity and swelling index as well as sensory attributes (colour, aroma and texture) In terms of chemical analysis, steeped samples from both types of mushrooms, irrespective of drying methods, exhibited higher contents crude protein, crude fibre and ash as compared to blanched powders. Blanching in hot water may cause leaching out of nutrients.

Practical implications

With regard to healthy benefits and medicinal value of mushroom, its production and consumption should be increased. However, mushroom production does not demand land, but helps in the bioconversion of potential pollutants like agro‐wastes to useful and nutritive food for human consumption, which is essential to a developing country like India.

Originality/value

The findings of this article may contribute significantly in overcoming protein deficiency in developing countries like India. Mushrooms have a low carbohydrate content, no cholesterol and are almost fat free. Therefore, they form an important constituent of a diet for a population suffering from atherosclerosis.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Patrick Ogwok, Robert Muyinda, Henriettah Nakisozi and Michael Bamuwamye

The aim of this paper is to investigate fat content and fatty acid profile of cultivated (Pleurotus ostreatus) and wild edible mushrooms (Amanita spp and Termitomyces microcarpus).

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate fat content and fatty acid profile of cultivated (Pleurotus ostreatus) and wild edible mushrooms (Amanita spp and Termitomyces microcarpus).

Design/methodology/approach

Pleurotus ostreatus was grown in soil and on cotton seed husks in mushroom growing rooms at Busitema University, Uganda. T. microcarpus and Amanita spp were collected from the wild. Freshly harvested mushrooms were dried at 60°C for 48 h in a hot air oven. Oil was extracted using a Clevenger apparatus. Fatty acid analysis was done using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

Findings

Fat content ranged between 0.24 and 5.23 per cent. Variation was noted between P. ostreatus grown in soil and on cotton seed husks (p = 0.0090). Similarly, Amanita spp and T. microcarpus had differing fat contents (p = 0.0098). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) predominated over saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). Linoleic acid (LA) was the most abundant fatty acid (FA) (30.91 to 54.35 per cent). It varied between Amanita spp and T. microcarpus (p = 0.0001) but not between substrates (p = 0.1891). Ratios of PUFA/SFA, MUFA/SFA and PUFA/MUFA were within the desirable ranges. Omega-6 FA/ω-3 FA ratio was higher than that recommended for a healthy diet. However, the low amount of fat in mushrooms suppresses the negative effects of a high ω-6 FA/ω-3 FA ratio.

Originality/value

Information on FA profile of cultivated and wild edible mushrooms will provide a basis for commercial exploitation of the cultivated mushrooms. This work showed that P. ostreatus, Amanita spp and T. microcarpus are healthy foods with regard to the low fat content and high amounts of LA.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Preeti Singh and G.K. Goyal

This paper aims to review the types of pizza and the functionality of basic ingredients of pizza with special focus on the effects of pizza toppings on health.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the types of pizza and the functionality of basic ingredients of pizza with special focus on the effects of pizza toppings on health.

Design/methodology/approach

Phenomenological research has raised awareness and increased insight into the role of various pizza ingredients and health benefits of different pizza toppings and consequently pizza is called a “functional food”. The approach is based on observation of the online research, a close watch on the pizza industry, analysis of research papers in journals, and brainstorming research on the effect of packaging on the quality of different pizza ingredients with a co‐researcher for four years.

Findings

The changing life patterns and food habits of people and their preferences have catapulted the market to grow for convenience and fast foods. Pizza is one of the most popular family foods worldwide and has gained widespread consumer acceptance as a healthy and convenience food. It is a multi‐component product with composite number of toppings. It provides an array of nutrients in significant amounts, in relation to its energy and fat content, making it a nutrient‐dense food. It is cheap and can be delivered in a very short time. In particular, pizza supplies 30 per cent of the USA recommended daily allowance of vitamins A, C, B2, calcium and protein. It contains 50 per cent of vitamin B1 and 35 per cent of iron. Furthermore, pizza has anticancerous effects beyond the basic nutrition it provides, because of the potent antioxidant lycopene present in tomatoes.

Originality/value

This paper offers a holistic view that would guide a reader to identify the beneficial effects of pizza.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2022

Novira Kusrini, Rini Sulistiawati and Imelda

This study aims to determine the optimum model of oil palm empty bunches (OPEB) management, to determine the optimal number of OPEB in waste management, which is then…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the optimum model of oil palm empty bunches (OPEB) management, to determine the optimal number of OPEB in waste management, which is then recommended to the company, and to know the achievement of various goals/targets with limited availability of resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitative approach is done by processing the data for financing and profit analysis in OPEB waste management which is then used for resource approach. A qualitative approach is undertaken for weighing purposes in the analytic hierarchical program (AHP) analysis. The research location was determined purposively in the crude palm oil mill of PT. Pundi Lahan Khatulistiwa in Ambawang, Kubu Raya Regency.

Findings

In order that the optimal settlement can achieve the goal/target of minimal environmental pollution, low cost and profit gain, the amount of OPEB that must be managed by the company is 311 tons prioritized for productive plants compost of 66.67 tons, organic fertilizer of 11 tons and mushroom growing media of 233.33 tons. Consequently, the company's cost of IDR 4.000.000.000 still spares IDR 2.004.694.000. The OPEB management as oyster mushroom promises a relatively high profit compared to other OPEB managements even though the cost is not the least.

Originality/value

This research is one of the few studies that examines the waste management model of palm oil empty bunches, mainly located in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Originality is seen from the use of optimization analysis tools with integration of AHP with goal programming.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Rajni Goyal and Rajbala Grewal

White button (Agaricus bisporus) mushroom (WBM) is a good source of fiber, protein and unsaturated fatty acids and is considered an effective food for the treatment of…

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Abstract

Purpose

White button (Agaricus bisporus) mushroom (WBM) is a good source of fiber, protein and unsaturated fatty acids and is considered an effective food for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

Design/methodology/approach

Male Wistar strain rats (28) were divided into four groups, two control and two experimental, which were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 1 per cent cholesterol and supplemented with 5 and 10 per cent dried mushroom for a period of 42 days. At the end of the experiment, the rats were anesthetized and blood samples were taken. The serum and liver were analyzed for total lipids, triglycerides and phospholipids.

Findings

Serum total lipid and triglyceride levels were reduced significantly in rats fed on 5 and 10 per cent WBM. However, serum phospholipid levels were decreased only in rats fed on 10 per cent WBM. The deposition of total lipids and triglycerides in liver decreased significantly in the experimental rats. However, no significant differences were observed in liver phospholipid levels in any experimental group of rats.

Originality/value

Hyperlipidemia is one of the leading medical problems nowadays, and it represents a major concern because of the associated death rates occurring in different communities. The study results indicate that this problem can be reduced through the consumption of A. bisporus mushrooms.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2022

Jose María Roncero Heras, Manuel Alvarez-Ortí, Arturo Pardo-Giménez, Adrián Rabadán, José Emilio Pardo and Alicia Roncero

Almond oil is a gourmet product with functional food characteristics owing to its high almond oil content and high nutritional quality. One of the primary constraints on…

Abstract

Purpose

Almond oil is a gourmet product with functional food characteristics owing to its high almond oil content and high nutritional quality. One of the primary constraints on its production is the lack of information regarding oil extraction from an industrial perspective, including by-products generation.

Design/methodology/approach

The performance, quality and composition characteristics were analyzed, both from the physical-chemical and organoleptic point of view, of the almond oils obtained through two pressure systems: screw press (SP) and hydraulic press (HP). To ensure the success of almond oil production at a commercial scale, in this work, an economic study of the costs of the process was carried out as a complementary part of optimizing the production of virgin almond oil.

Findings

Physicochemical analysis showed little difference, just in total sterols (HP 2069, SP 2153) and some quality indexes (K232: HP 1.63, SP 2.13; peroxide index: HP 1.74, SP 0.95), in contrast to sensory analysis. Consumer judges valued roasted almond oil extracted using a HP the best. The production cost of the oil extracted with the SP was €23.05/l. With the HP it was €25.13/l, owing to the lower oil yield in the extraction. The most expensive treatment was for the HP with toasted almonds (€27.76/l), owing to the greater need for processing.

Originality/value

Production costs derived from the method used have received little attention. This paper presents data that allow for the transference between academic and industrial ambit and their economic viability.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2018

Caska and Henny Indrawati

This paper aims to analyze sustainability level of crispy palm tankos mushroom business; institutions involved in the development of crispy palm tankos mushroom business…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze sustainability level of crispy palm tankos mushroom business; institutions involved in the development of crispy palm tankos mushroom business in Riau Region; nutritional composition, sensory assessment both descriptively and hedonically, and also designing the suitable and hygienic packaging for crispy palm tankos mushroom in Riau; institutional structuring model involved in the development of crispy palm tankos mushroom business in Riau; and strategies to improve the quality of crispy palm tankos mushroom in Riau.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is quantitative research conducted by survey. The research was conducted in Indragiri Hulu, Pelalawan, Kampar and Siak, Riau Province, Indonesia from April to August 2017. The study population is all producers producing crispy oil palm mushroom in the research area. The sample was determined purposively with the criterion of the producers who have been running their business for at least 5 years. Based on the criterion, there were 225 producers included as the sample.

Findings

This study found that business sustainability is the main concern of micro business of crispy palm tankos mushroom in Riau Province. Although local government lack of support, the average value of business sustainability is in the very high category. In addition due to the excellent business support quality, business sustainability is supported by the family environment, independence and business progress. There are two institutions involved in the development of makers business to date, they are informal financial institutions that help makers to increase business capital, and retailers who help makers deliver products to consumers. The results of nutritional composition analysis of crispy palm tankos mushroom showed that the crispy tankos mushroom is a product with good nutrition value for consumption by the community. The implication of this study is to improve the quality of the tankos mushroom crispy palm in terms of color according to the choice of the panelists.

Originality/value

Originality of this study aims to provide strategic formulation to use local resources and improve the economic actors of the home industry of crispy palm tankos mushroom processing in Riau. This research is conducting a structure to the institutions involved in the development of crispy palm tankos mushroom and improving the product quality. This research contributes to the development of science, especially economic development, particularly the development of small industries.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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