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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2019

Le Ma, Richard Reed and Jian Liang

There has been declining home ownership and increased acceptance of long-term renting in many western countries including Australia; this has created a problem when…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been declining home ownership and increased acceptance of long-term renting in many western countries including Australia; this has created a problem when examining housing markets as there are dual demand and include both owner-occupiers and investors. The purpose of this paper is to examine the long-run relationship between house prices, housing supply and demand, and to estimate the effects of the two types of demand (i.e. owner-occupier and investor) on house prices.

Design/methodology/approach

The econometric techniques for cointegration with vector error correction models are used to specify the proposed models, where the housing markets in the Australian states and territories illustrate the models.

Findings

The results highlight the regional long-run equilibrium and associated patterns in house prices, the level of new housing supply, owner-occupier demand for housing and investor demand for housing. Different types of markets were identified.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that policies that depress the investment demand can effectively prevent the housing bubble from further building up in the Australian states. The empirical findings shed light in the strategy of maintaining levels of housing affordability in regions where owner-occupiers have been priced out of the housing market.

Originality/value

There has been declining home ownership and increased acceptance of long-term renting in many western countries including Australia; this has created a problem when examining housing markets as there are dual demand and include both owner-occupiers and investors. This research has given to the relationship between supply and dual demand, which includes owner-occupation and investment, for housing and the influence on house prices.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Samantha Organ, David Proverbs and Graham Squires

The existing housing stock needs substantial adaptation to meet national and international carbon reduction targets. The largest proportion of housing is owner‐occupied…

2061

Abstract

Purpose

The existing housing stock needs substantial adaptation to meet national and international carbon reduction targets. The largest proportion of housing is owner‐occupied, and will require improvement works which go beyond those measures provided through the Green Deal and similar programmes. Therefore, the motivation of owner‐occupiers to perform more substantial energy efficiency refurbishments is essential to facilitate greater action. This paper aims to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of the extant literature from a range of disciplines reveals the role of motivation and the factors influencing motivation and pro‐environmental action in the context of the home. Based on this synthesis of the literature, a new motivation model for energy efficiency refurbishment in the owner‐occupied housing stock is then described.

Findings

The study has found that multiple factors affect motivation to refurbish in the owner‐occupied housing stock. Key motivations for energy efficient refurbishment can be categorized into the broad themes of economic, social, and environmental motivations. These motivations will be affected by a wide number of interrelated internal and external factors and mediated by the emotions of the individual. The model presented demonstrates the relationship between the multiple factors that affect energy efficiency refurbishment in relation to specific contexts.

Originality/value

The study represents a potential addition to motivational theory and concepts for use within the field of energy efficient refurbishment of the owner‐occupied housing stock. Implications for future government policy and towards raising the motivation of owner‐occupiers are identified: it can be used to shape national and local policy and information campaigns to motivate energy efficiency refurbishment in the owner‐occupied housing stock. To be successful, this should take differing internal factors and contexts into consideration and the dynamic nature of owner‐occupier motivation. The model can also be used by industry professionals to better understand the owner‐occupier customer motivations for energy efficiency refurbishment and therein provide a better service.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

This paper seeks to explore the satisfaction rating associated with the repair and maintenance of 34 most occurring house defects remedied by owner‐occupiers selected from…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the satisfaction rating associated with the repair and maintenance of 34 most occurring house defects remedied by owner‐occupiers selected from a stratified random sample.

Design/methodology/approach

The study targeted over 1,200 owner‐occupiers from 12 local authority wards; these were identified on the basis of the Ward Index of Multiple Deprivation. The sample also included some neighbourhoods recently designated for improvement under the Urban Renewal's Single Regeneration Budget initiative within the Northwest of England.

Findings

Through the use of nonparametric statistical techniques, the paper argues that owner‐occupiers' expectation of the quality of maintenance works is a derivative dichotomy of unrelated decision constructs: on the one hand is the prior knowledge of the severity of house defects which, in turn, impacts on the follow‐on repair strategies and maintenance quality expectations. On the other hand are the projected improvements as perceived in terms of the added value to a dwelling vis‐à‐vis the principal methods of remediation enshrined within the broader renewal initiatives.

Originality/value

Overall, the results suggest that expectations on maintenance quality ought to be defined as owner‐occupiers' perception of desired standard of work relative to the projected market value of their property. The study further concludes that, when all the notable variations in the satisfaction rating on follow‐on maintenance strategies and expectations are considered together, it is the perceived increase in the value of a property – following improvement works under the urban renewal programme – that stands out as the main influencing criterion.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

This paper sets out to detect and explore underlying causes of increasing uncertainty and lack of transparency in the home maintenance sector. The study gives an account…

Abstract

This paper sets out to detect and explore underlying causes of increasing uncertainty and lack of transparency in the home maintenance sector. The study gives an account of owner‐occupiers' experience on the standards of work they encounter with small‐scale domestic traders. Part I of the study focuses on the consensus ranking of 13 building maintenance standards or attributes that owner‐occupiers expect from builders (Xbmas) whilst part II focuses on the contrast between expectations and the actual standards that owner‐occupiers observe from builders (Obmas). The application of nonparametric statistical techniques enabled the study to discover a consensus on what defines expectations and how these differ from observed standards. The final inventory generated on standard attributes is an essential information for existing builders, new entrants in the domestic sector and can be used to inform housing regeneration professionals and agencies involved in the design and management of schemes for small‐scale builders.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

This paper seeks to explore and detect underlying relationships between identifiable attributes that are influential to successful outcomes of home maintenance activities…

1287

Abstract

This paper seeks to explore and detect underlying relationships between identifiable attributes that are influential to successful outcomes of home maintenance activities. The study's approach is to identify, from the perspective of owner‐occupiers, the attributes that are influential on the successful outcomes of home maintenance activities. The study is primarily based on 186 questionnaire responses from a stratified random sample of owner‐occupiers taken from 12 local authority wards identified on the basis of a Ward Index of Multiple Deprivation. The intercorrelations among the attributes influential to the outcomes of home maintenance activities demanded the application of principal component analysis to determine the factors perceived to dictate home maintenance outcomes. This resulted in the extraction of nine significant factors, which combine to exert their influence on the quality of the maintenance activities in the owner‐occupied sector.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Tuulia Puustinen, Kyösti Pennanen, Heidi Falkenbach, Anne Arvola and Kauko Viitanen

The purpose of this paper is to study views of owner-occupiers concerning infill development as a mechanism for financing major repairs in apartment buildings and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study views of owner-occupiers concerning infill development as a mechanism for financing major repairs in apartment buildings and financial benefits they require from the infill development for accepting it near their homes (on the plot of their housing company).

Design/methodology/approach

The data used draws upon a survey of 894 respondents concerning residents’ views on infill development in Finland. The required financial benefits from the infill development were questioned in both relative proportions of the expenses related to major repairs and concrete monetary sums.

Findings

First, the findings indicate that the financial benefits owner-occupiers require in order to accept infill development are significant, covering about two-thirds of the costs of major repairs during following ten years or over 75 percent of an (imagined) upcoming pipeline repair. Second, approximately one-fifth of the respondents regard that no economic benefit is enough to make them support infill development. Third, people’s decision-making concerning infill development is complex, involving also many other factors than monetary.

Practical implications

This paper provides insight into the feasibility of infill development as a means to finance major repairs from the perspective of owner-occupiers. The paper has strong policy implications as it highlights the significance of the public authorities and their policies in enabling the infill development.

Originality/value

This is the first academic study to focus on owner-occupiers views and financial requirements for the infill development as a means to finance major repairs in apartment buildings.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

The purpose of this paper is to espouse Triggernomic Repair Process Analysis (TRAP), a nonlinear theoretical methodology employed to stress the importance of an informed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to espouse Triggernomic Repair Process Analysis (TRAP), a nonlinear theoretical methodology employed to stress the importance of an informed approach to the diagnosis and prognosis of structural building defects at the owner‐occupier level.

Design/methodology/approach

TRAP analysis focuses on the diagnosis limitations relating to house repair and maintenance among owner‐occupiers in the UK, based on a stratified random survey of owner‐occupiers' maintenance decisions.

Findings

It is concluded that lack of technical skills‐knowledge awareness is one of the main deterrents to efficient defect diagnosis. The failing on defect diagnosis is broadly defined as resulting from Chronic Deficiency of Defects Diagnosis (CD3). CD3 is furthermore conceptualised as a theoretical dichotomy construct which persists due to Chronic Diagnosis Failure (CDF) and Chronic Misapplication of Maintenance Remedies (CMMR).

Originality/value

The constructs identified help to explain why owner‐occupier housing disrepair remains high and a source of concern among practitioners in the UK. A pro‐maintenance housing regeneration agenda is imminent in order to promote technical skill‐knowledge awareness and the effectiveness of the maintenance decision making among owner‐occupiers.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Kirsten Arge

The importance of adaptability in office buildings has increased during the past years, mostly due to factors like rapid change, both in private and public organisations…

3926

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of adaptability in office buildings has increased during the past years, mostly due to factors like rapid change, both in private and public organisations, new and innovative work place design and growing environmental concerns about building redundancy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design of the study presented here is a comparative case study, where recently built office buildings by 11. Norwegian real estate developers are assessed with regard to 16 different adaptability measures.

Findings

The study shows that office buildings built by owner‐occupiers are more adaptable than office buildings built by the group who develop property for renting and management, and considerably more than the office buildings built by the group who develop property for sale to investors. A short‐term perspective on property investment, i.e. that of the group who develop property for sale to investors, does not favour adaptability concerns. A long‐term perspective as well as a use‐value perspective on property investment, i.e. that of the owner‐occupier stakeholder group, on the other hand, do favour adaptability in office buildings.

Research limitations/implications

Whether this research can help making buildings more adaptable, depends on whether the real estate customers, i.e. the users, they who pay for using the office building, understand the value of adaptability and are willing to pay the extra cost of adaptability. The building professions, including the real estate developers, claim that they know how to make office buildings adaptable.

Originality/value

The value of this paper may lie in demonstrating that this knowledge is not used in practice.

Details

Facilities, vol. 23 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Peer Smets

This chapter aims at providing insight into how social mixing plays out in the Transvaal neighborhood in Amsterdam — a neighborhood which has gone through various rounds…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims at providing insight into how social mixing plays out in the Transvaal neighborhood in Amsterdam — a neighborhood which has gone through various rounds of urban renewal — in the context of nationwide polarization between native-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch.

Methodology/approach

This chapter is based on research with a neighborhood focus — daily interactions, urban renewal, and use of public space — which took place during 2007–2010. Methods used include participant observation, semistructured interviews, and focus groups.

Findings

The physical renewal implies renovating and pulling down social housing, and building new social or owner-occupier housing. This study provides insight into how residents of different ethnic and income backgrounds live together in the neighborhood, also taking into account the impact of social polarization at the national level.

Social implications

By knowing how people with different ethnic and class backgrounds live together in Transvaal neighborhood, it contributes to the formulation of evidence-based policies for the improvement of social cohesion, livability, safety of the neighborhood, and social capital of local residents.

Originality/value

This study looks at social mix in the context of national-level social polarization between native-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch. This creates a new viewpoint seen against how the general literature on renewal and social mixing tends to do two things: firstly it usually explicitly or implicitly is also a tenure mix strategy, and secondly the policy focus of the social mix is usually around class issues, that is, the mixing of poor social housing tenants with richer owners.

Details

Social Housing and Urban Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-124-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Joseph Kangwa and Femi Olubodun

This paper sets out to explore and detect underlying causes to increasing uncertainty and lack of transparency in the home maintenance sector. The study gives an account…

Abstract

This paper sets out to explore and detect underlying causes to increasing uncertainty and lack of transparency in the home maintenance sector. The study gives an account of owner‐occupiers' experience on the standards of work they encounter with small‐scale domestic traders. Part I, in a previous issue, focused on the consensus ranking of 13 building maintenance standards or attributes that owner‐occupiers expect from builders (Xbmas) while part II focuses on the contrast between expectations and the actual maintenance setbacks observed from builders (Obmas) and which are a source of displeasure among owner‐occupiers. The application of nonparametric statistical techniques enabled the study to detect consensus on what defines expectations and how these differ from observed standards. An understanding of this disparity could be essential information for existing builders, new entrants into the home maintenance sector and inform housing regeneration professionals and agencies involved in the architecture and management of schemes for small‐scale builders.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

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