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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Neringa Gerulaitiene, Asta Pundziene and Egle Vaiciukynaite

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of the dynamic managerial capabilities (DMC) of the spouse (either working or non-working) of a family firm owner on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of the dynamic managerial capabilities (DMC) of the spouse (either working or non-working) of a family firm owner on firm innovativeness. This paper assesses the role of three elements of the DMC of owners' spouses (emotion regulation, conflict resolution and networking capabilities) that are bridged by familiness on family firm innovativeness.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the results of a multiple case study. Twelve cases were selected: six innovative and six non-innovative family firms in Lithuania. The study design enabled a comparison not only of innovative and non-innovative family firms but also of non-working and working spouses of family firm owners.

Findings

The findings show that family firm owners' spouses contribute to firm innovativeness through their DMC in terms of emotion regulation, conflict resolution and networking capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

This research focused on a sample of firms in Lithuania. Future studies should broaden the research to other countries.

Originality/value

This research provides empirical evidence of the hidden role of the DMC of family firm owners' spouses and their contribution to firm innovativeness. This paper extends the application of DMC to family business research.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Ray A. DeCormier

Establishing an appointment with a potential industrial or commercial client is typically an unnerving experience. In fact, this author believes it is the most important…

Abstract

Establishing an appointment with a potential industrial or commercial client is typically an unnerving experience. In fact, this author believes it is the most important and the most difficult step in the entire sales process. One reason why it is so important is because it is the first sale in a series of negotiations leading to a contract. Speaking candidly, if one cannot sell an appointment, one cannot sell. Often, this is the acid test for hiring an industrial salesperson. Suggests certain rules and attitudes as well as illustrates practical techniques to overcome objections enhancing the probability of getting face to face with a prospect.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2018

Rabi Sidi Ali

This paper seeks to find factors that influence the growth intention of female-owned small businesses in the Ghana’s tourism sector. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to find factors that influence the growth intention of female-owned small businesses in the Ghana’s tourism sector. The purpose of this paper is to investigate why some female entrepreneurs achieve growth objectives while others do not.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors seek to understand the growth intention within the tourism sector because it is not clear why some female entrepreneurs in Ghana pursue growth. The study applies quantitative techniques. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 110 female tourism entrepreneurs in Ghana. Data analysis was conducted using the non-parametric procedures of Spearman’s rank correlation.

Findings

The findings of this research reveal that female tourism entrepreneurs in Ghana feel they can expand without entrepreneurial ability(ies). However, the growth of the venture is restricted by the lack of financial resources. Opportunities in the tourism sector do generate more customers, but cannot alone determine growth intentions. Furthermore, an important finding of this study is that business advisory services do not contribute significantly to the growth intention of the venture. The research made clear that the pursuance of growth is related to different types of opportunities and finance leveraging.

Research limitations/implications

The study has gender-specific, industry-specific, size-specific and region-specific limitations. Another limitation is focus on entrepreneurial ability, opportunity and business advisory support services as determinants of female entrepreneurs’ growth intention.

Practical implications

This study provides useful information for government, business agencies and academics seeking reasons on why female entrepreneurs have low growth intentions. Policy measures are provided in assisting women in achieving their growth aspirational needs and suggestions are recommended to encourage women to grow their small tourism businesses.

Social implications

The research will contribute to improve the socio-economic status of women entrepreneurs in Africa.

Originality/value

This paper addresses an under-researched area of female tourism entrepreneurs and their growth intention from the perspective of a developing country such as Ghana.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Michael H. Morris, Roy W. Williams and Deon Nel

Classifies controllable or internal factors influencing family business transitions into three groups: preparation level of the heirs, family relationships, and planning…

Abstract

Classifies controllable or internal factors influencing family business transitions into three groups: preparation level of the heirs, family relationships, and planning and control activities. To assess the impact of each set of factors on the ease of generational transitions and subsequent family business performance, a cross‐sectional survey was directed at owner/ managers of second‐ and third‐generation family businesses. Suggests that, in successful transitions, heirs are reasonably well‐prepared, family relationships tend to be positive, and succession planning and related control activities are relatively informal. Of these three, trust and communication in family relationships appears to have the most significant impact on transitions. Draws managerial implications and makes suggestions for ongoing research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Karl Hellman

Typically, business‐to‐business (B2B) promotions are price cuts that drain profits and erode brand equity for the sake of short‐term volume gains. This paper shows how to…

Abstract

Purpose

Typically, business‐to‐business (B2B) promotions are price cuts that drain profits and erode brand equity for the sake of short‐term volume gains. This paper shows how to elevate B2B promotions to a central place in implementing strategy – creating extra value for customers, building brand equity, improving profits, and permanently increasing sales.

Design/methodology/approach

The article examines nine successful non‐price promotions and shows the patterns and principles that made them work.

Findings

The article posits a new conceptual model that organizes the findings from the nine cases: “the customer learning curve.” Strategy‐driven promotions move customers down this mental process from having a need – but perhaps not even knowing it – all the way through to being advocates for the firm and its products.

Research limitations/implications

The model provides a framework for analyzing existing, and designing future, decision‐oriented market research.

Practical implications

Strategy‐driven promotions focus on overcoming barriers to purchase. The best are specific (don't ask the promotion to do the whole job); creative (go beyond the conventional, “drop the price” thinking); customer‐centered (borrow interest from something the customer really cares about); measurable (if you can't measure it, you can't learn from it); and brand enhancing (don't fall into the trap of eroding brand equity).)

Originality/value

The customer learning curve is an original conceptual model and practical problem‐solving tool. The nine cases provide original examples.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Brian R. Proksch, William H. Ross and Tony Estness

A six‐day negotiation simulation was developed from newspaper articles and interviews with elected officials. In this integrative bargaining exercise, participants assume…

Abstract

A six‐day negotiation simulation was developed from newspaper articles and interviews with elected officials. In this integrative bargaining exercise, participants assume the role of either the Richland Town Board or the River City Mayor's Office and attempt to resolve a conflict between the two governments. Several homeowners in the unincorporated town of Richland have had their wells fail and have asked to annex into River City. Richland officials want to stop such annexations and instead purchase water from River City. River City officials want to annex as much of Richland as possible and prevent it from incorporating. Both sides are provided with common information as well as confidential information. Using their information, they must negotiate over several days, seeking an agreement that addresses each side's interests and concerns.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Sharon M. Danes, Amanda E. Matzek and James D. Werbel

The purpose of this study was to explore the couple relationship context within the venture creation process over time. Conservation of Resources and Family FIRO theories…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the couple relationship context within the venture creation process over time. Conservation of Resources and Family FIRO theories were the theoretical foundation, and constructs from these theories were integrated to develop the analytical framework. The sample consisted of couple-level data from 94 start-up businesses at Time 1 with information from entrepreneur and spouse; there were 78 businesses at Time 2. Analysis of spousal resources invested in the newly created businesses indicated that direct and indirect spousal involvement in the business, spousal moral commitment, spousal perception of entrepreneur's business self-efficacy, business communication quality, and emotional support from the spouse were enabling resources during the venture creation process. Work overload and work and family conflict were constraining resources during this process. Couples in a very strong relationship reported significantly more enabling resources and fewer constraining resources than couples not in a very strong relationship.

Details

Entrepreneurship and Family Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-097-2

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Ruth Gaffney‐Rhys and Joanna Jones

The aim of this paper is to explore inheritance planning amongst small business owners, which is important due to the complex nature of a business proprietor's estate and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore inheritance planning amongst small business owners, which is important due to the complex nature of a business proprietor's estate and the fact that the latter sometimes have specific aspirations regarding the succession of the enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The article highlights the problems that can arise if a business owner dies intestate and then considers the levels of will ownership amongst small business owners in South Wales and attitudes to inheritance planning.

Findings

The primary research conducted found that a significant number of small business owners have not made a will (51 percent) and that the reasons for not doing so are complex and varied.

Originality/value

Several themes emerged from the study, such as the importance of contact with professional advisers, the impact of culture on inheritance planning, reliance on trust, the problems associated with complicated family circumstances and the effect of the current economic climate on attitudes to inheritance planning

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Xuguang Guo and Jon M. Werner

This paper aims to examine the relationship between family responsibilities and family support, on the one hand, and decisions by men and women concerning owning a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between family responsibilities and family support, on the one hand, and decisions by men and women concerning owning a business, as well as how many hours they work in that business.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used data collected by the US Current Population Survey between 1989 and 2011 and had a starting sample of 1,258,430 individuals, and a final sample of 27,147.

Findings

The authors found that both women and men are more inclined to own a business when they are married, have children or receive financial support from their spouse. They also found widespread gender differences in these analyses. The influence of family-related issues on owning a business is stronger for women than for men.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that male business owners work longer hours if they have young children. In contrast, female business owners reduce their work hours if they are married, have young children and receive support from their spouse. Implications are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Kevin J. Sigler

Explains the new US tax rules for calculating the required minimum distributions from employer‐sponsored qualified retirement plans, 403(b) plans and individual retirement…

Abstract

Explains the new US tax rules for calculating the required minimum distributions from employer‐sponsored qualified retirement plans, 403(b) plans and individual retirement accounts, pointing out that when the owner of a tax‐deferred retirement account dies the beneficiary of the fund becomes liable for tax. Gives numerical examples to illustrate the application of the rules.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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