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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Tracey J. Dickson and Pam Faulks

While Australian snowsport participation may represent a small part of the overall international snowsport market, the fact that Australians are renowned for their…

Abstract

Purpose

While Australian snowsport participation may represent a small part of the overall international snowsport market, the fact that Australians are renowned for their willingness to travel makes the travel motives and behaviours of Australian skiers and snowboarders a worthwhile area of research. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research was conducted via online survey using both convenience and snowball sampling to investigate overseas snowsport travel intentions, in the next seven months, of Australian skiers and snowboarders, many of whom were advanced participants.

Findings

People who indicated that they intended to travel overseas for snowsport were mostly males, experienced snowsport participants, under 35 years of age, well‐educated, and in higher income levels. The results indicate that the key motivations of those intending to travel overseas relate to the core of on‐snow experience: reliability of snow, quality of snow, variety of terrain and off‐piste areas. Of less importance were the off‐snow and alternative on‐snow activities.

Practical implications

With the major sources of information for planning an overseas snowsport trip being the internet and families and friends, the availability of current information such as resort maps and current snow conditions via web cams, and the quality of experience of every customer visiting the resort, are key marketing strategies for this niche market.

Originality/value

This paper concentrates on those Australian holiday‐makers whose prime interest is snowsports to the exclusion of off‐piste activities/pleasures. It also highlights the significant role of both the internet and word‐of‐mouth recommendation in holiday planning, and consequently the need to ensure that every visitor experiences a high quality vacation.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 62 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1966

Vincenzina Santoro

For the purpose of estimating travel receipts and expenditures, the Office of Business Economics in the Department of Commerce which gathers this data, recognizes three…

Abstract

For the purpose of estimating travel receipts and expenditures, the Office of Business Economics in the Department of Commerce which gathers this data, recognizes three major travel categories: Canada, Mexico and Overseas. Travel with neighboring countries is broken down into short‐term and long‐term travel. In the case of Canada, short‐term travel is that which takes place in less than 24 hours. For the Mexican account, it is travel under 72 hours. The Overseas category is subdivided into four areas: Europe and the Mediterranean, West Indies and Central America, South America and all other countries.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2018

Serli Wijaya, Wahyuniwati Wahyudi, Claudia Benita Kusuma and Evelyn Sugianto

This study focuses on the Indonesian seniors’ motivation in terms of travelling to a destination abroad. Using the push–pull motivation constructs and recognising the role…

Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on the Indonesian seniors’ motivation in terms of travelling to a destination abroad. Using the push–pull motivation constructs and recognising the role of culture in influencing travel behaviour, the purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the underlying factors that explain why Indonesian seniors travel to and select an international destination.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based survey was completed to collect data from 246 Indonesian seniors aged 55 years and over who had travelled overseas. Factor analysis was applied to reduce the total of 34 push and pull travel motivation items into new underlying factors. Informal interviews were also undertaken to support the analysis.

Findings

Personal development, relaxation and relationship enhancement appeared to be the three factors that internally pushed the seniors to travel abroad. Meanwhile, facilities and hygiene, destination familiarity, value for money and destination proximity, local attractions and supporting travel facilities were found to be the factors that pulled the seniors to select an international destination they would like to visit. The emergence of relationship enhancement, destination familiarity and value for money and destination proximity factors were evident that the unique aspect of Indonesian cultural values could shape the motivation of Indonesian seniors to go travelling.

Originality/value

Although studies on senior travel motivation are abundant, empirical research studies that focus on examining Indonesian senior travel behaviour are still rare. This study therefore serves as one of the first attempts to examine the behaviour of Indonesian seniors when undertaking outbound travel trip. Based on the study’s findings, practical recommendations were offered to tourism stakeholders involved in tailoring a specific tourism product and services for the Indonesian senior tourist market.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Bruce C.Y. Wang and Nailin Bu

Career aspirations of 145 senior undergraduate business students in Canada were analyzed. An overwhelming majority desired an overseas assignment at some point in their…

Abstract

Career aspirations of 145 senior undergraduate business students in Canada were analyzed. An overwhelming majority desired an overseas assignment at some point in their career, and they were not adversely affected by the 9‐11 terrorist attack. While 60 percent of the students considered pursuing a global career with multiple international assignments, 40 percent of those did so hesitantly. While receptivity to international careers was affected by the expectations of how such a career would enhance the quality of professional life and speed career advancement, willingness to accept a particular position was mostly influenced by the extent to which it would allow for a satisfying personal life. An international assignment would likely be rejected if it was at an undesirable location or would negatively affect family life. Women were as receptive to international careers as men, and multilingual students with foreign friends tended to have a strong interest in international careers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Peter Enderwick and Swati Nagar

Increasing globalisation of the healthcare sector suggests that there may be new competitive opportunities for emerging economies in this price‐sensitive sector. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing globalisation of the healthcare sector suggests that there may be new competitive opportunities for emerging economies in this price‐sensitive sector. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which emerging economies, and in particular the four major Asian competitors – Thailand, India, Malaysia and Singapore – can compete successfully in the medical tourism (MT) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors evaluate this sector in terms of Porter's Diamond of National Competitiveness, as well as considering the challenges that competitors must address. The primary challenges relate to attracting consumers, proving assurances of quality for a credence good, increasing scale while maintaining quality, addressing ethical issues and moving beyond simple price‐based competition.

Findings

The authors conclude that the major Asian competitors in MT benefit from strong government support, rely heavily on overseas linkages and accreditation, and are competing in very similar ways. In the future, further differentiation is both likely and desirable.

Originality/value

The paper offers a theoretically based analysis of the future competitiveness of the rapidly evolving MT industry in four key Asian economies. This industry appears to relate well to the comparative advantage of emerging economies and offers future opportunities for upgrading and value adding.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Yunen Zhang, Wei Shao and Park Thaichon

This paper aims to investigate whether cultural intelligence will influence Chinese tourists’ travel satisfaction, revisit intention and word-of-mouth communication.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether cultural intelligence will influence Chinese tourists’ travel satisfaction, revisit intention and word-of-mouth communication.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted to collect data from 614 adult Chinese tourists, who have overseas travel experiences. Then, the Statistics Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and the structural equation modelling (SEM) were employed for data analysis.

Findings

The findings confirm that cultural intelligence has significant positive impacts on tourist satisfaction, revisit intention and electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) communication. Additionally, tourist satisfaction significantly affects tourist eWOM communication.

Originality/value

This study provides theoretical and practical contributions regarding the effects of tourist cultural intelligence, especially on tourist post-travel evaluation and behavioural intention, which has been merely investigated in extant tourism research.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 March 2003

Kenneth M Holland and Ben L Kedia

Recruiting students to study abroad is a difficult challenge for American colleges and universities. Study abroad advisors and directors of international programs are…

Abstract

Recruiting students to study abroad is a difficult challenge for American colleges and universities. Study abroad advisors and directors of international programs are searching for better ways of marketing the overseas academic experience. Approximately 3% of U.S. students who pursue a bachelor’s degree study abroad at some point in their college career. In any given year, less than 1% (0.8%) of U.S. students take part in study abroad (Hayward, 2000, p. 9). American higher education falls far short of the Presidential Commission’s target of 10% by 2000 set in 1979 (Strength Through Wisdom, 1979). The typical college student who participates in study abroad is an undergraduate liberal arts major who spends one semester in a country in Western Europe. In 1999–2000, 63% of American students studying abroad were in Europe (Snapshot of Report on Study Abroad Programs, 2000, p. 1). Almost one fourth go to one country – Great Britain. Fifteen percent of study abroad students travel to Latin America, 6% to Asia and 3% to Africa (Hayward, 2000, p. 10). The small number of U.S. students (129,770) who experienced foreign study in 1998–1999 compares unfavorably with the much larger number of foreign students (490,933) who enrolled in U.S. institutions (Hesel & Green, 2000, p. 5). Even more disheartening is the fact that nearly 50% of students entering 4-year colleges say that they want to study abroad and that three out of four adults agree that students should study abroad (Hesel & Green, 2000, p. 1). When asked to choose which activity in college is most important to them, entering freshmen rank study abroad second only to internships (Hesel & Green, 2000, p. 3). There are obviously a number of barriers to student participation in foreign study.

Details

Study Abroad
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-192-7

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Yu-Chin Huang, Li-Hsin Chen, Cih-Wei Lu and Jui-Lin Shen

Previous empirical studies have not documented the link between vegetarians’ dietary constraints and travel intentions. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to utilise…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous empirical studies have not documented the link between vegetarians’ dietary constraints and travel intentions. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to utilise a mixed-methods approach to examine the interrelationships of this group’s travel motivations, travel constraints, constraint negotiations and behavioural intentions, with special reference to how dietary constraints deter its members from travelling, and its extent.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire was administered to outbound Taiwanese vegetarian travellers (n=418), and this was followed by in-depth, semi-structured interviews (n=9) to complement the quantitative data.

Findings

The results indicated that vegetarians’ dietary constraints significantly deterred them from travelling in certain circumstances: notably, in the company of non-vegetarians. Nevertheless, it was found that some vegetarians efficiently negotiated their constraints and persisted in travelling, in some cases, by compromising their dietary preferences.

Practical implications

Travel agents and planners should explore more strategies to meet the needs of vegetarian travellers to increase this group’s travel satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study established the first theoretical model explaining the relationships among vegetarians’ travel motivations, dietary constraints, constraint negotiations and travel intentions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Fang Meng

The article aims to discuss the relationship of culture and tourist behavior. The focus of the study is to propose an extended research framework related to…

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to discuss the relationship of culture and tourist behavior. The focus of the study is to propose an extended research framework related to individualism/collectivism culture and group travel intention. The article seeks to argue that group travel intention and behavior is not only influenced by the cultural background of individualism or collectivism, but also a function of several factors including social, political, and economic influence, as well as personal background of individual travelers.

Design/methodology/approach

The article investigates the major current research and methodological issues in cross‐cultural tourist behavior studies. By reviewing and assessing important concepts related to this particular theoretical topic, the study proposes a conceptual framework based on the extensive literature review and discussion.

Findings

The study proposes that personal background, as well as social, political, and economic factors all moderate the relationship between culture and group travel behavior, making tourist behavior in collectivism or individualism cultures more similar or different from one another. The research also tests whether social conditions of marginality contribute to the differences.

Practical implications

The study helps avoid the stereotypes of individualism/collectivism culture related to group travel behavior, and provides better understanding of the function of various personal, social, political, and economic factors on tourist behavior.

Originality/value

Cross‐cultural studies in tourism are limited, especially in the tourist behavior sector. The article offers insights into the cultural differences and tourist behaviors on a more detailed market basis.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Arch G. Woodside, Xiang (Robert) Li and Karlan Muniz

“Country-collectors” (CCs) are defined here as international leisure travelers who have visited 6 +  countries within the five most recent calendar years primarily to…

Abstract

“Country-collectors” (CCs) are defined here as international leisure travelers who have visited 6 +  countries within the five most recent calendar years primarily to pursue leisure activities. The study here contributes by offering an early workbench model of antecedents, paths, and outcomes of country-collectors’ evaluations and behavior toward countries as place-brands competing for such visitors. This study reports findings from a large-scale omnibus survey in three large Japanese cities (total n = 1,200). Key findings support the model and the following conclusions. Generally, country-collectors represent a small share of a nation’s adult population (less than 5%) but over 40% of the total leisure trips abroad; country-collectors are classifiable into distinct sub-segments according to the country place-brands that they visit; CC sub-segments, less frequent international leisure travelers, and stay-in-country travelers and non-travelers each offer unique assessments of competing countries as place-brands. National place-brand strategists planning a marketing campaign to influence a given nation’s residents to visit a specific destination (e.g., persuading Japanese nationals to visit the United States) may increase the campaign’s effectiveness by using this workbench model. The study offers a blueprint of how to appraise strengths and weaknesses of competing national place-brands among realized and potential visitors in specific national markets.

Details

Tourists’ Behaviors and Evaluations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-172-5

Keywords

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