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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Cybele May and Josephine Previte

This paper aims to provide guidance on how midstream social marketing can be used to understand and address wicked problems through adopting a collaborative systems…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide guidance on how midstream social marketing can be used to understand and address wicked problems through adopting a collaborative systems integration approach conceptualised from a macromarketing perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Rothschild’s motivation, opportunity and ability (MOA) framework is applied in this study to understand veterinarians as midstream microactors in the macrosystem of wicked animal welfare issues. Focus group and individual interview data from veterinarians were analysed through the lens of the MOA framework to understand veterinarians’ as midstream microactors within a systems continuum.

Findings

The MOA of veterinarians to engage downstream targets – cat owners – in behaviour change are identified. Fresh insights reveal the challenges and barriers to simply focusing on veterinarians as the key microactor required to address the wicked problem of cat overpopulation. Challenges identified include the cost of sterilisation to both owners and veterinary practices, alongside vying beliefs about the capacity of individual veterinarians to persuade owners about the benefits of sterilisation to improve animal welfare. Additionally, insight into veterinarians’ perceptions of upstream strategies to address the problem – in terms of marketing, education and law – expose further complications on where regulation and law enforcement can be integrated in future social marketing strategies to address the cat overpopulation problem.

Practical implications

The application of the MOA framework improves understanding of the concept and practice of midstream social marketing. It provides a practical and strategic tool that social marketers can apply when approaching behaviour change that leverages midstream actors as part of the social change solution.

Originality/value

Research and theorisation in this paper demonstrates an alternative pathway to address wicked problems via a collaborative systems integration approach conceptualised from a macromarketing perspective. Effective long-term change relies on understanding and coordinating a broad macrosystem of interconnected actors along a downstream, midstream and upstream continuum. This starts by understanding the microactions of individual actors within the macrosystem.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Karin Kuhlemann

This paper aims to consider few cognitive and conceptual obstacles to engagement with global catastrophic risks (GCRs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider few cognitive and conceptual obstacles to engagement with global catastrophic risks (GCRs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper starts by considering cognitive biases that affect general thinking about GCRs, before questioning whether existential risks really are dramatically more pressing than other GCRs. It then sets out a novel typology of GCRs – sexy vs unsexy risks – before considering a particularly unsexy risk, overpopulation.

Findings

It is proposed that many risks commonly regarded as existential are “sexy” risks, while certain other GCRs are comparatively “unsexy.” In addition, it is suggested that a combination of complexity, cognitive biases and a hubris-laden failure of imagination leads us to neglect the most unsexy and pervasive of all GCRs: human overpopulation. The paper concludes with a tentative conceptualisation of overpopulation as a pattern of risking.

Originality/value

The paper proposes and conceptualises two new concepts, sexy and unsexy catastrophic risks, as well as a new conceptualisation of overpopulation as a pattern of risking.

Abstract

Subject Area

Consumer Behavior.

Study Level

This case is suitable to be used in advanced undergraduate and MBA/MSc level.

Case Overview

This case illustrates an animal shelter’s challenge pertaining to lack of awareness among individuals with regard to animal adoption and proper treatment toward animals. Brian Teoh, the founder of a local animal shelter “We Care For You (WCFY),” was really worried by observing the situation of the animals’ vulnerability as well as pet owners’ irresponsible behavior. Overpopulation in animal shelters is a common problem. The space of the shelter is limited and not enough to take more animals to take care unless existing animals are being adopted by the pet owners. Adoption is a way to give room for other animals to be taken by animal shelters. However, most of the individuals prefer to buy rather to adopt. Moreover, potential adopters are usually selective of the animal they intend to adopt by having criteria preferences for adoption. Brian was thinking how to make people aware about the animal right and proper treatment with animals and also how to make individuals aware about the necessity to adopt rather than purchasing them. He was drowned in deep thought. Although the situation seemed not so promising, he felt determined to work on this awareness-building issue.

Expected Learning Outcomes

This objective of this case is to:

  • highlight the challenges faced by the animal shelters in order to make individuals aware of the importance of adopting animals rather than purchasing them from shops;

  • emphasize the importance of using social media in disseminating information nationwide; and

  • the necessity to educate people about the right treatment toward animals.

highlight the challenges faced by the animal shelters in order to make individuals aware of the importance of adopting animals rather than purchasing them from shops;

emphasize the importance of using social media in disseminating information nationwide; and

the necessity to educate people about the right treatment toward animals.

Details

Green Behavior and Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-684-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Omiunota Nelly Ukpokodu

This paper reports on a three-year study that examined the effect of 9/11 on preservice teachers’ perspectives and dispositions toward global concerns and global…

Abstract

This paper reports on a three-year study that examined the effect of 9/11 on preservice teachers’ perspectives and dispositions toward global concerns and global perspective pedagogy. Participants responded to a “before” and “after” survey in which they indicated the level of their awareness of global concerns, perceptions of their importance, perceived impact on self, and dispositions toward global-perspective pedagogy. The study utilized both quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis. The data revealed that 9/11 had a significant effect on preservice teachers that resulted in a shift in perspectives and dispositions toward critical global concerns and teaching about them. The findings highlight the critical importance of preparing preservice teachers to develop global perspectives, cultivate critical knowledge and perceptual understandings of global concerns, and nurture favorable dispositions toward global perspective pedagogy.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Daniel Caffey and Walter Block

This paper argues that the belief that the rapid growth of the human population will inevitably lead to a major ecological disaster is neither intuitively nor empirically…

Abstract

This paper argues that the belief that the rapid growth of the human population will inevitably lead to a major ecological disaster is neither intuitively nor empirically tenable. A significant portion of the world's pollution comes not from overpopulated poorer nations, but from Western nations with very low population growth rates. On the other hand, most of this damage is the result of misguided government policies, and not Western overconsumption. Overpopulation is not likely to be a problem environmentally because Malthusian predictions are often made based on the assumption that current rates of resource use and population growth rates will remain the same. Such assumptions ignore the critical role that adaptability has played in allowing humans to avert Malthusian crises. Substitution of products, innovative production methods, and technological changes all ensure in the long run, very few of the facts that predictions are based on will remain fixed.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2015

J. Daniel Hammond

This paper compares the contexts of the writing of T. R. Malthus’s first edition of An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798); its reception by William Godwin, to…

Abstract

This paper compares the contexts of the writing of T. R. Malthus’s first edition of An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798); its reception by William Godwin, to whom the Essay was addressed; its interpretation by naturalists Charles Darwin and Alfred Russell Wallace; and its interpretation by modern commentators Kenneth Boulding and A. M. C. Waterman. The analysis helps explain how an essay that was written to defend social and economic institutions from critiques in utopian visions associated with the French Revolution came to be regarded as a model predicting overpopulation and exhaustion of natural resources.

Details

A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-857-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

David Raitt

The paper will first discuss certain sociocultural trends such as population growth, increased life expectancy, the labour force and education, and look at how these are…

Abstract

The paper will first discuss certain sociocultural trends such as population growth, increased life expectancy, the labour force and education, and look at how these are affecting society as a whole. Such trends are linked with the global economy and the industrial sector as well as the environment. The consequences of such trends are a number of problems which face the world in the future, particularly in developing countries. These problems include overpopulation, levelling off of food supplies, diseases, natural resources depletion, and conflicts and clashes in areas where immigration and cultural differences exist. Such problems are discussed together with their implications. Some ideas are then given on how these future difficulties might be overcome; and it is clear that information will have an enormous role to play in this respect. Topics covered comprise global awareness (for example of the environment, birth control, women's rights, healthcare) through education and information; frontierless transactions; global information access, dissemination, communication and transfer of knowledge; knowledge build‐up and transfer through CDROM archiving of latent skills and know‐how; and the like.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Natalie Pang and Debbie Pei Chin Goh

Building on studies examining the role of social media in contemporary forms of collective action and social movements, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

1669

Abstract

Purpose

Building on studies examining the role of social media in contemporary forms of collective action and social movements, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between prior informational use of social media and individualized collective action.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 220 participants were surveyed in real-time during a protest against overpopulation in Singapore.

Findings

Social media use was significant in disseminating information about the protest, and reflecting perceived personal relevance for specific issues. The authors found mixed motivations for attending the protest, significantly shaped by social proximity to organizers and personal relevance.

Originality/value

The authors address research gaps in the link between social media use and individualized collective action, and real-time data collection during a protest. It is often difficult to study this link, given that social media may not be always the only platform used prior to a protest by participants. The case discussed here provides a unique opportunity for this to be addressed: the protest was not publicized by local mainstream media prior to the event and social media was the only place for both activists and the public to find and disseminate information about the protest. In other words, how participants used social media had a direct and meaningful impact on their participation in the protest.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 21 December 2017

Pakistan's overpopulation problem.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB227631

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

C. Burnette and D. Hosni

India is the second most populous nation in the world with 859 million inhabitants in 1991 (10). It is expected to reach the one billion mark before the end of this decade…

Abstract

India is the second most populous nation in the world with 859 million inhabitants in 1991 (10). It is expected to reach the one billion mark before the end of this decade and to overtake top‐ ranking China by the next century(8). It is a fact that overpopulation remains a major roadblock to its development. India was the first nation to adopt family planning programmes targeting population control as a national priority in its development plans(12). Policy‐makers had hoped to cut their high birth rate (31 per 1000 population) in half by year 2000(8). But, its high fertility rate (4.00) will continue to persist as long as the inferior status of women in society prevails.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

1 – 10 of 441