Search results

1 – 10 of over 168000
Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2016

Jörg Hruby, Lorraine Watkins-Mathys and Thomas Hanke

Within the literature of global mindset there has been much discussion of antecedents. Few attempts have been made, however, to analyze the outcomes of a global mindset…

Abstract

Within the literature of global mindset there has been much discussion of antecedents. Few attempts have been made, however, to analyze the outcomes of a global mindset. Our chapter undertakes a thematic analysis of global mindset antecedents and outcomes in the 1994–2013 literature. Adopting an inductive approach and borrowing methods from international business and managerial cognition studies, we map, assess, and categorize 42 empirical and 10 theoretical studies thematically. We focus on the antecedents and outcomes at individual, group, and organizational levels. We conceptualize corporate global mindset as a multidimensional construct that incorporates global mindset at the individual level and is dependent on a robust communications infrastructure strategy for its cultivation throughout the organization. Our study categorizes antecedents and outcomes by level and identifies the gaps in global mindset outcomes and firm performance for future researchers to address.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-138-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Louzanne Bam, Katleen De Stobbeleir and PJ Vlok

Limited research where team creativity (TC) is positioned as an independent variable constitutes a weak point in the body of knowledge. This paper aims to offer three…

Abstract

Purpose

Limited research where team creativity (TC) is positioned as an independent variable constitutes a weak point in the body of knowledge. This paper aims to offer three contributions to address this research gap: empirical research that has been conducted on the outcomes of TC is summarized; a person–environment fit perspective is applied to develop a conceptual model for TC; and directions for future empirical research are proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is conducted to identify empirical research on the outcomes of TC. This is summarized into an extension of an existing framework that organizes empirical research on the antecedents of TC. Furthermore, the fit model for TC is developed, based on a person–environment fit perspective.

Findings

Research on the outcomes of TC has focused on three themes: performance; affective state; and processes. Gaps in this body of knowledge include limited knowledge on performance outcomes and a lack of research on potential negative outcomes. Recommendations for future research include: potential moderators of the relationship between TC and two outcome, innovation and team performance, are proposed; strain and unethical decision-making are proposed as potential negative outcomes of TC; and it is proposed that incorporating a temporal dimension would improve the understanding of the cyclical manner in which certain variables and TC may interact over time.

Originality/value

The organizing framework extension summarizes existing knowledge on the outcomes of TC, and together with the fit model for TC, this offers a basis for identifying research gaps and directions for future research. Specific directions for future empirical research are proposed.

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Stephanie Thomas, Jacqueline Eastman, C. David Shepherd and Luther Trey Denton

The purpose of this paper is to study the relational impact of using win-win or win-lose negotiation strategies within different types of buyer-supplier relationships.

3093

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the relational impact of using win-win or win-lose negotiation strategies within different types of buyer-supplier relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-method approach is used. Qualitative interviews with supply chain managers reveal that relationship-specific assets and cooperation are important relational factors in buyer-supplier negotiations. Framing interview insights within the social exchange theory (SET), hypotheses are tested using a scenario-based behavioral experiment.

Findings

Experimental results suggest that win-lose negotiators decrease their negotiating partner’s commitment of relationship-specific assets and levels of cooperation. In addition, the use of a win-lose negotiation strategy reduces levels of relationship-specific assets and cooperation more in highly interdependent buyer-supplier relationships than relationships that are not as close.

Research limitations/implications

Buyer-supplier relationships are complex interactions. Negotiation strategy choice decisions can have long-term effects on the overall relationship. As demonstrated in this study, previous research focusing on one side “winning” a negotiation as a measure of success has oversimplified this complex phenomenon.

Practical implications

The use of a win-lose negotiation strategy can have a negative impact on relational outcomes like cooperation and relationship-specific assets. For companies interested in developing strong supply chain relationships, buyer and suppliers should choose their negotiation strategy carefully as the relational impact extends beyond the single negotiation encounter.

Originality/value

Previous research predominantly advocates for the use of a win-win negotiation strategy within interdependent relationships. This research offers evidence that the use of a win-lose strategy does have a long-term relational impact.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Tamara Oukes and Ariane Raesfeld von

Start-ups are companies that are not yet embedded in a pre-existing network of relationships. Studies that researched how start-ups act in their relationships focused on…

Abstract

Purpose

Start-ups are companies that are not yet embedded in a pre-existing network of relationships. Studies that researched how start-ups act in their relationships focused on just one type of action and assumed that start-ups are autonomous in how they choose to act. However, organisational action in relationships is both interactive and dynamic. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how a start-up interacts with its partners over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The research aim is addressed through a longitudinal case study of a start-up in the medical device business. It was analysed how this start-up and its six key partners acted and reacted during 18 interactions episodes, what triggered these actions and what the outcomes of their actions were. In addition, the researchers explored if and how the subsequent episodes were related.

Findings

First, the case shows that the past and the future affect current episodes. Second, it shows that action was triggered by both internal and external events which could expand or constrain opportunities for future interactions. Third, the findings show that there was a pattern in the interaction modes used during the relationship. Fourth, the findings show that the initial mode of interaction was often imitated by the counterparty. Finally, it is shown that there are clear links between the trigger, interaction process and outcome in an interaction episode.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate that besides the focal firm, partners should always be actively and directly involved in any research into organisational action. Moreover, action in relationships should be characterised as a dynamic process that is in a state of continual change.

Practical implications

Managers of start-ups: can influence the outcomes of their relationships through their actions; have to react to both opportunities and conflicts in their relationships; can rely on their network to solve conflicts; and should closely consider their own actions and their counterparty’s actions.

Originality/value

The research is valuable because it studies the interactive and dynamic nature of start-ups’ action in relationships.

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2013

Lasse Mertins, Debra Salbador and James H. Long

This paper synthesizes the extant research on the outcome effect in the accounting domain, focusing primarily on the context of performance evaluation. It reviews the…

4198

Abstract

This paper synthesizes the extant research on the outcome effect in the accounting domain, focusing primarily on the context of performance evaluation. It reviews the current state of our knowledge about this phenomenon, including its underlying cognitive and motivational causes, the contexts in which the outcome effect is observed, the factors that influence its various manifestations, and ways in which undesirable outcome effects can be mitigated. It also considers various perspectives about the extent to which outcome effects represent undesirable judgmental bias, and whether this distinction is necessary to motivate research on this topic. The paper is intended to motivate and facilitate future research into the effects of outcome knowledge on judgment in the accounting context. Therefore, we also identify important unanswered questions and discuss opportunities for future research throughout the paper. These include additional consideration of instances in which the outcome effect is reflective of bias, how this bias can be effectively mitigated, ways in which outcome information influences judgment (regardless of whether this influence is considered normative), and how the underlying causes of the outcome effect operate singly and jointly to bring about the outcome effect. We also consider ways that future research can contribute to practice by determining how to encourage evaluators to retain and incorporate the relevant information conveyed by outcomes, while avoiding the inappropriate use of outcome information, and by enhancing external validity to increase the generalizability of experimental results to scenarios frequently encountered in practice.

Details

Journal of Accounting Literature, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-4607

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

Connie R Wanberg, Elizabeth T Welsh and Sarah A Hezlett

Organizations have become increasingly interested in developing their human resources. One tool that has been explored in this quest is mentoring. This has led to a surge…

Abstract

Organizations have become increasingly interested in developing their human resources. One tool that has been explored in this quest is mentoring. This has led to a surge in mentoring research and an increase in the number of formal mentoring programs implemented in organizations. This review provides a survey of the empirical work on mentoring that is organized around the major questions that have been investigated. Then a conceptual model, focused on formal mentoring relationships, is developed to help understand the mentoring process. The model draws upon research from a diverse body of literature, including interpersonal relationships, career success, training and development, and informal mentoring. Finally, a discussion of critical next steps for research in the mentoring domain is presented.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-174-3

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2022

Dan Wu, Liuxing Lu and Lei Cheng

This paper aims to establish a theoretical search model on academic social networking sites (ASNSs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish a theoretical search model on academic social networking sites (ASNSs).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the characteristics of ASNSs and a previous extended sense-making model, this paper first presented an initial model of searching on ASNSs. Next, an online survey was conducted on ResearchGate to understand the search processes and outcomes with the help of a survey questionnaire. In total, 359 participants from 70 countries participated in this online survey. The survey results provided a basis for modifying the initial model.

Findings

Results showed that the theoretical model of searching on ASNSs included motives for searching on ASNSs, identification of needs, search triggered by information needs, search triggered by social needs and outcomes. The search triggered by information needs was significantly positively correlated with learning outcomes. Besides learning outcomes, searching on ASNSs could help user amplify their social networks and promote research dissemination.

Practical implications

Understanding users’ search habits and knowledge acquisition can provide insights for ASNSs to design an interface to support searching and enhance learning. Moreover, the proposed model can help users recognize their knowledge status and learning effects and improve their learning efficiency.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to establishing a theoretical model to understand users’ search process and outcomes on ASNSs.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Ramy Hindiyeh and Jennifer Cross

The purpose of this paper is to identify, through an exploratory meta-analysis, which process- and outcome-related antecedents have the strongest relationship to overall…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify, through an exploratory meta-analysis, which process- and outcome-related antecedents have the strongest relationship to overall team performance. The secondary objective is to create an understanding of the extent to which relative research interest in each construct to date has aligned with its reported effects.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a random-effects meta-analysis on studies that have measured the relationship between at least one process or outcome factor and overall team performance. The number of studies, effect size and between-study variances are captured and analyzed for each process/outcome factor. Prior literature has explored relationships between various process/outcome factors and overall team performance. This study expands on previous literature by examining a comprehensive set of process/outcome factors and their relative impact on overall team performance.

Findings

A meta-analysis of 190 effect sizes extracted from 52 empirical studies over the past two decades (1999–2020) showed the specific process and outcome factors that most strongly contributed to overall team performance were efficiency, schedule and innovation. In addition, only a weak correlation was found between process and outcome factors’ relationships with overall team performance and how often they are studied in the research community.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge on team performance by examining prior research to identify the relevant impact of various process and outcome factors on overall team performance. In addition, this study also assesses the extent to which research interest in these factors has appeared to match their relative impact. Analyzing the relative impact of various process and outcome factors allows researchers and practitioners to better identify methods to create improvement in overall team performance. Based on the findings, prioritizing efficiency, schedule and innovation may promote overall team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Brian M. Belcher, Rachel Claus, Rachel Davel and Stephanie M. Jones

The purpose of this study is to assess the contributions of graduate research to social innovation and change for learning and improved transdisciplinary practice…

1260

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the contributions of graduate research to social innovation and change for learning and improved transdisciplinary practice. Universities, as centers of teaching and research, face high demand from society to address urgent social and environmental challenges. Faculty and students are keen to use their research to contribute to social innovation and sustainable development. As part of the effort to increase societal impact, research approaches are evolving to be more problem-oriented, engaged and transdisciplinary. Therefore, new approaches to research evaluation are also needed to learn whether and how research contributes to social innovation, and those lessons need to be applied by universities to train and support students to do impactful research and foster an impact culture.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a theory-based evaluation method to assess the contributions of three completed doctoral research projects. Each study documents the project’s theory of change (ToC) and uses qualitative data (document review, surveys and interviews) to test the ToC. This paper uses a transdisciplinary research (TDR) quality assessment framework (QAF) to analyze each projects’ design and implementation. This paper then draws lessons from the individual case studies and a comparative analysis of the three cases on, namely, effective research design and implementation for social transformation; and training and support for impactful research.

Findings

Each project aimed to influence government policy, organizational practice, other research and/or the students’ own professional development. All contributed to many of their intended outcomes, but with varying levels of accomplishment. Projects that were more transdisciplinary had more pronounced outcomes. Process contributions (e.g. capacity-building, relationship-building and empowerment) were as or more important than knowledge contributions. The key recommendations are for: researchers to design intentional research, with an explicit ToC; higher education institutions (HEI) to provide training and support for TDR theory and practice; and HEIs to give more attention to research evaluation.

Originality/value

This is the first application of both the outcome evaluation method and the TDR QAF to graduate student research projects, and one of very few such analyses of research projects. It offers a broader framework for conceptualizing and evaluating research contributions to social change processes. It is intended to stimulate new thinking about research aims, approaches and achievements.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Stephen Ball, Judith Mudd, Marie Oxley, Mike Pinnock, Hazel Qureshi and Elinor Nicholas

This paper explores how a research‐based understanding of outcomes in social care can be incorporated into practice. Drawing on research by the Social Policy Research Unit…

Abstract

This paper explores how a research‐based understanding of outcomes in social care can be incorporated into practice. Drawing on research by the Social Policy Research Unit and the practical experience of North Lincolnshire Social Services Department, this paper highlights how culture change and the involvement of stakeholders are key to using outcomes ideas as a motivational framework for service improvement.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 168000