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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

David Walton, Michael Fullerton and Seraphim Patel

This paper seeks to discuss the collaborative development and piloting of joint user outcome measures for older adults with mental health problems (OAMH) and their carers…

173

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the collaborative development and piloting of joint user outcome measures for older adults with mental health problems (OAMH) and their carers. Outcome measures are crucial to measuring the impact of services on people's lives and are central to the new NHS and Adult Social Care (ASC) Outcome Frameworks.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the development of a joint user outcome measure based on ASC User Experience Surveys (UES) and User Outcome Measures, and NHS Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMS) and Patient Reported Experience Measures (PREMS).

Findings

The aim was to supplement existing clinical outcome measures (HONOS65+) with holistic measures of the impact of services on the lives of patients, easy to administer, covering a range of health and social care outcomes and meeting both health and social care outcome requirements.

Originality/value

As far as is known this is one of the first tests of a joint patient reported experience and outcome measure. Such measures may enable joint services to: measure wider outcomes as well as clinical outcomes; meet the new focus on outcomes; and enable more systematic collection of outcome and effectiveness/Value for Money (VFM) data. There are also lessons about collaborative working and development.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Sean McCartney and Reva Berman Brown

The paper explores the literature concerning outcome measures used in health services. The need to measure outcomes subsequent to encounters with health services has been…

2665

Abstract

The paper explores the literature concerning outcome measures used in health services. The need to measure outcomes subsequent to encounters with health services has been identified and occurs as a result of the current “value for money” approaches being used within the NHS. Provider units are required to establish the effects which interventions have had on the health of each individual using their services, despite the fact that definitions of health outcomes used by both professionals and managers are problematic. It is suggested here, however, that outcome measures which answer all requirements will remain elusive, and their effectiveness will vary according to the circumstances of their generation and use. Moreover, the very use of outcome measures as management tools can lead to a subversion of the meaning which led to their selection in the first place. Managing by (outcome measure) numbers is not a realistic way forward.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 May 2012

Lan Guo, Bernard Wong-On-Wing and Gladie Lui

The present research examines the effect of incentivizing both outcome and driver measures of SPMS on middle managers' proactivity in influencing the strategy formulation…

Abstract

The present research examines the effect of incentivizing both outcome and driver measures of SPMS on middle managers' proactivity in influencing the strategy formulation process. A case-based experiment was conducted among 74 full-time employees. The results suggest that when incentives are linked to both outcome and driver measures of SPMS, compared with when they are outcome-based and not linked to the SPMS, managers are more proactive in communicating strategy-related issues to top management. In addition, this effect of SPMS-based incentives on middle managers' proactivity is mediated by their autonomous extrinsic motivation to achieve strategic goals. The results are in general consistent with postulates of the self-determination theory of motivation. This chapter also has practical implication. Specifically, recent evidence suggests that most SPMS adopters fail to validate causal business models underlying their formulated strategies (Ittner, 2008; Ittner & Larcker, 2003, 2005). Middle managers' proactive strategic behavior may be one means to prompt top management to inspect formulated strategies and their underlying business models.

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2022

Marjan Ghazirad, Olivia Hewitt and Sarah Walden

The use of anti-dementia medication in people with intellectual disabilities has been controversial and requires additional research to assess the efficacy of such…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of anti-dementia medication in people with intellectual disabilities has been controversial and requires additional research to assess the efficacy of such medications. An essential part of this treatment (both in terms of research and clinical practice) is having robust outcome measures to assess the efficacy of these medications for individuals. Currently there is no consensus in the UK regarding which outcome measures, in conjunction with clinical judgement, are effective in informing clinicians’ decision-making regarding anti-dementia medication management and this paper aims to present useful outcome measures.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify relevant outcome measures. Outcome measures focused on aspects of patients’ presentation such as cognition, activities of daily living, neuropsychiatric presentation or the impact of their presentation (either on themselves, or on others). These outcome measures were critically appraised to ascertain their suitability in informing clinician’s decisions regarding management of anti-dementia medication. The focus of this appraisal was on good quality measures that are practical and accessible and can be easily used within clinical NHS services.

Findings

This paper provides advice for clinicians on using appropriate outcome measures, depending on patients’ presentations and the symptoms of dementia being targeted, that can be used alongside their clinical assessment to enhance their anti-dementia medication management. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the use of such outcome measures.

Originality/value

The case for using a range of assessments that are both broad in focus, and those specifically selected to measure the areas of functioning targeted by the anti-dementia medication, is presented.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Gillian Fairfield and Andrew F. Long

Discusses measuring outcomes in the context of disease management and provides a single framework in the form of a key question checklist. Identifies key stakeholders…

400

Abstract

Discusses measuring outcomes in the context of disease management and provides a single framework in the form of a key question checklist. Identifies key stakeholders. Outlines levels of outcome monitoring, measurement and date type and source. The development of an evaluative culture is essential to successful outcome measurements.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Róisín Kearns, Nancy Salmon, Mairead Cahill and Eithne Egan

No occupational therapy outcome measures have been designed specifically for recovery-orientated services.This paper aims to identify occupational therapy outcome measures

3717

Abstract

Purpose

No occupational therapy outcome measures have been designed specifically for recovery-orientated services.This paper aims to identify occupational therapy outcome measures relevant to mental health practice and assess them against recovery principles adopted by Irish Mental Health Services.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review methodology was used to appraise outcome measures against CHIME recovery principles.

Findings

A systematic search across 13 databases identified eight well-established outcome measures commonly used within occupational therapy mental health literature. The included outcome measures were appraised using a recovery alignment tool.

Practical implications

All outcome measures connected to some recovery processes. Those using semi-structured interview formats and notably the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) had the strongest alignment to recovery processes.

Originality/value

This is the first known review which provides some validation that the included outcome measures support recovery processes, yet the measures rely heavily on therapist’s skills for processes to be facilitated. It recommends that ways to better support the process of partnership in occupational therapy mental health outcome measures be explored and further research be undertaken.

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Karen Dodd, Alick Bush and Alexandra Livesey

Outcome measurement is a key priority for services. There are no papers on specific overall quality outcome measures for people with intellectual disabilities who have…

Abstract

Purpose

Outcome measurement is a key priority for services. There are no papers on specific overall quality outcome measures for people with intellectual disabilities who have dementia. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and piloting of a new measure.

Design/methodology/approach

A process was developed to measure quality outcomes across all stages of dementia. The reliability of the tool was measured using Cronbach’s α coefficients, along with data about its clinical utility.

Findings

The QOMID has good reliability, face validity and internal reliability suggesting that all domains contribute equally towards the construct of quality outcome. An exploratory factor analysis revealed that there may be four or five sub-factors within the QOMID, The clinical utility of the assessment tool was explored and it can be concluded that the QOMID is simple, fairly quick and effective.

Research limitations/implications

The scale has good psychometric properties and the initial parameters for the QOMID were met. Further exploration of factors needs to be considered with a larger sample of participants.

Practical implications

The scale was liked by assessors and gives a practical tool that can both measure the quality outcome for people at each stage of their dementia, and help to develop more effective care plans.

Originality/value

This is the first measure to look at quality outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities and dementia and which takes a staged approach.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Amy Hebblethwaite, Nigel Denyer, Annette Hames and Sarah Wharton

Government guidelines state that health services must measure outcomes for patients. However, there is only limited evidence on outcome measures for children with learning…

Abstract

Government guidelines state that health services must measure outcomes for patients. However, there is only limited evidence on outcome measures for children with learning disabilities. This paper reports on a study designed to investigate the suitability and effectiveness of four outcome measures (Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents ‐ HoNOSCA, Children's Global Assessment Scale ‐ C‐GAS, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire ‐ SDQ, and Commission for Health Improvement Experience of Service questionnaire ‐ CHI) for a community team working with children with learning disabilities. The paper highlights the difficulties in capturing the impact of service intervention in a multidisciplinary community setting. The implications of the research for clinical practice are discussed.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

XiaoHu Wang

This study discusses conditions for effectively implementing outcome-oriented performance budgeting. Using a survey of local officials in Florida, it finds that public…

135

Abstract

This study discusses conditions for effectively implementing outcome-oriented performance budgeting. Using a survey of local officials in Florida, it finds that public officials' consensus on organizational goals and performance measures is necessary for effective implementation. Consistent communication among public officials and legislative support are crucial for this strategy. This study also reveals that performance reporting and management practice can enhance performance budgeting. In addition, an understanding about how budgetary inputs are converted into budgetary outcomes is also important. Finally, a performance budgeting system, with an emphasis on outcome measures and citizen evaluation, should include various types of performance measures.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Donald Forrester

There are often calls for more focus on outcomes in Children’s Social Care yet there is little consensus on what these outcomes should be. Key challenges include who…

Abstract

Purpose

There are often calls for more focus on outcomes in Children’s Social Care yet there is little consensus on what these outcomes should be. Key challenges include who should decide what outcomes should be measured and the sheer range of issues that social workers deal with. The purpose of this paper is to provide a reflective account of approaches to measuring outcomes that the author has used in recent studies in order to illustrate the complexity involved in understanding what the purpose of Children’s Social Care is and therefore how outcomes might be measured.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of and reflection on lessons from recent research studies carried out by the author and colleagues.

Findings

The results are used to illustrate and support an argument that Children’s Social Care performs multiple functions and that this has implications for thinking about outcomes. Helping children and parents is one element of the work, but assessing risk across large numbers of referrals and identifying those that require involvement is equally important. Furthermore, the social work role requires complex considerations around liberty and the rights of parents and children. One consequence of this is that the quality of the service provided is important in its own right.

Research limitations/implications

It is suggested that the evaluation of Children’s Social Care involves four types of outcomes: measures of the quality of the service provided; assessment of whether the “right” families are being worked with; client-defined measures of change; and the development of appropriate standardised instruments. Examples of approaches in each area are discussed.

Practical implications

The theoretical considerations suggest that we need to have a multi-dimensional approach to evaluating, inspecting and leading Children’s Social Care services. In particular, the importance of the quality of delivery and appropriate targeting of the service are emphasised, as well as considering various approaches to measuring outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a combination of qualitative and quantitative measures of process, assessment and outcomes for evaluating outcomes in Children’s Social Care.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 12 no. 2-3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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