Search results

1 – 10 of over 55000

Abstract

Details

Building Blocks for Sustainable Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85-724516-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Ali Mohammad Soltani, Seyed Habibollah Tabatabaeian, Payam Hanafizadeh and Jahanyar Bamdadsoofi

The purpose of this paper is to suggest indicators for evaluating Iran national nanotechnology plan at the policy and program levels. Governments are required to evaluate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest indicators for evaluating Iran national nanotechnology plan at the policy and program levels. Governments are required to evaluate their policies to be accountable to their audience and to improve their policies. The evaluation of nanotechnology policies both in academic and governmental institutions has been mainly confined to measuring the research and development outputs, while explicit models are required for evaluating national nanotechnology policies and programs. In other words, although policies are translated into several activities, it does not mean that the evaluation of activities results in holistic policy evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

The present research uses a qualitative method to explore the process of developing a model for assessing nanotechnology policymaking in Iran. Expert opinions have been collected and analyzed by using local and international surveys to validate different elements of the model.

Findings

The model includes the evaluation time-frame, criteria and indicators for policy and program levels. Assessment at program and policy levels, as distinct from activity evaluation, measures the ultimate objectives of a policy intervention, based on which the outcome and impact indicators should be developed. This paper argues that the Iran national nanotechnology policy should be evaluated and revised triennially based on the model in which 46 outcome and impact indicators are included under three general criteria of appropriateness, efficiency and effectiveness. A number of these indicators should be evaluated annually or biannually.

Originality/value

The evaluation of nanotechnology plans has been mainly limited to assessing the research and development outputs that are related to the activity level. The main value of this work is developing outcome and impact indicators that are related to policy and program levels.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Claire Hamasu and Elizabeth Kelly

The purpose of this paper is to describe how the logic model can provide infrastructure for library programming from planning, tracking accomplishments, identifying where…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how the logic model can provide infrastructure for library programming from planning, tracking accomplishments, identifying where adjustments are required, to reporting outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental Region has used the logic model since 2003 for planning and organizing its work. Its geographically dispersed librarians carry out six project initiatives. The logic model is used during planning to establish consensus on expectations and responsibilities. An online reporting tool, developed in 2004, tracks staff activities to the logic model. Quarterly reports for each project uses reporting tool data to determine whether the project is going along as planned or whether an intervention is required. At the end of the year, a final report assesses the achievement outcomes and indicators.

Findings

Writing a logic model is a study in semantics. It is important to be as specific as possible. Accurately defining terms saves puzzlement down the line on whether an activity was carried out as planned or an indicator was met. Measurable targets for each indicator encourage staff to continuously evaluate their activities and adjust their work to achieve the desired results. Writing realistic indicators is a process that improves with practice. Early in the program enthusiasm and the optimism of the librarian staff led to the indicators that were unrealistic within a one year timeframe.

Practical implications

The logic model accommodates the unforeseeable and helps evaluate whether an activity is worth doing. It is impossible to identify all future opportunities. The logic model runs from the visionary (goals) to the ordinary (activities). When the unexpected arises it can be evaluated on how closely it addresses goals and outcomes and can be tied to that goal or outcome when reporting. The integration of the logic model into the program is made more efficient with an online report system. Having a system that links staff work to the logic model facilitates analysis, decision making, and reporting.

Originality/value

The logic model is generally touted as a planning tool. This paper expands the use of the logic model as a tool for planning, tracking, and reporting.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Ericka Costa and Michele Andreaus

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the multidimensional nature of social and nonprofit organisations' accountability and performance measurement systems (PMSs)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the multidimensional nature of social and nonprofit organisations' accountability and performance measurement systems (PMSs). It further considers how these systems help in defining outcome performance indicators downward to beneficiaries

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses participatory action research (PAR) within an Italian social enterprise. In order to increase dialogue, participation and engagement, the researchers adopted focus groups as a preferred method of investigation and conducted a broad documental analysis from July 2016 to March 2018. The paper discusses the gathered data in light of the social impact value chain as well as the multiple-constituency approach.

Findings

The findings support the idea that social and nonprofit organisations lack the expertise and resources to evaluate outcomes and impact; however, through PAR, the organisation defined their desired outcomes and ascertained which internal output measures were most likely to be correlated with these outcomes. Moreover, the findings highlight that nonprofits develop outcome measurements less frequently because they have more control over their immediate activities and outputs.

Practical implications

This research suggests the need to reinforce lateral and downward accountability based on mission and mission-based activities in order to make the performance management system of social and nonprofit organisation linked to the organisational strategies.

Originality/value

This paper innovates methodologically in two directions: 1) it adopts action research as a qualitative method, allowing the researcher to generate solutions to collectively-identified problems and 2) the paper's arguments are strongly supported by rich empirical exploration that occurred over a period of 20 months in an Italian social enterprise.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Karl Aiginger and Johanna Vogel

This paper aims to show how the term competitiveness has been applied and adapted since Michael Porter made it respectable in economics, strategic management and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how the term competitiveness has been applied and adapted since Michael Porter made it respectable in economics, strategic management and consulting. This paper connects the concept with new developments in the theory of the firm, theories of growth and, finally, with Beyond GDP literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper distinguishes between input and output competitiveness, developing a set of indictors for both. Countries are ranked according to costs, structure and capabilities (drivers of competitiveness) as well as according to economic, social and ecological performance (performance pillars). Finally, outcome competitiveness is explained by the individual drivers, using econometrics and principal component analyses.

Practical implications

Defining competitiveness as the ability of a country or nation to deliver Beyond GDP goals changes the policy conclusions drawn from the quest for competitiveness. Policies to reduce costs prove inferior relative to “high-road strategies” built on skills, innovation and supporting institutions. Ecological ambition and social investment are not costs, but enablers of competitiveness for high-income countries.

Originality/value

Connecting the well-known term competitiveness with Beyond GDP goals is a new approach. It is very different from the old concept of cost competitiveness criticized heavily by Paul Krugman. Supplying a set of indicators to measure “low-road” and “high-road” competitiveness leads to important new policy conclusions.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 January 2016

Laban P. Ayiro

The education system in Kenya is continually challenged to adapt and improve, in part because its mission has become far more ambitious than it once was due to the massive…

Abstract

The education system in Kenya is continually challenged to adapt and improve, in part because its mission has become far more ambitious than it once was due to the massive investment in education by successive governments over the last two decades. Today, most Kenyans expect schools to prepare all students to succeed in postsecondary education and to prosper in a complex, fast-changing global economy. To identify the most important measures for education and other issues and provide quality data on them to the country, there is a need for the ministry of education to establish a National Education Indicators framework. This criterion is hoped to enable policy makers and the public better assess the position and progress of the country across the education sector. The key task in developing education indicators will be to identify a clear and parsimonious set of measures and data that will be easy for non-specialists to understand but which will also do justice to the complexities of the ailing education system. These indicators will amplify the existing situation and will be drawn from a large, and sometimes conflicting, body of information about students, teachers and schools. The purpose of this study is to propose and urge the government to develop a national framework of indicators that will inform stakeholders on the performance of the education system, both at school and national level.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2015
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-297-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Anat Drach‐Zahavy, Efrat Shadmi, Anat Freund and Margalit Goldfracht

The purpose of this article is to identify and test the effectiveness of work strategies employed by regional implementation teams to attain high quality care for diabetes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to identify and test the effectiveness of work strategies employed by regional implementation teams to attain high quality care for diabetes patients.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in a major health maintenance organization (HMO) that provides care for 70 per cent of Israel's diabetes patients. A sequential mixed model design, combining qualitative and quantitative methods was employed. In‐depth interviews were conducted with members of six regional implementation teams, each responsible for the care of 25,000‐34,000 diabetic patients. Content analysis of the interviews revealed that teams employed four key strategies: task‐interdependence, goal‐interdependence, reliance on top‐down standardised processes and team‐learning. These strategies were used to predict the mean percentage performance of eight evidence‐based indicators of diabetes care: percentage of patients with HbA1c < 7 per cent, blood pressure ≤ 130/80 and cholesterol≤100; and performance of: HbA1c tests, LDL cholesterol tests, blood pressure measurements, urine protein tests, and ophthalmic examinations.

Findings

Teams were found to vary in their use of the four strategies. Mixed linear models analysis indicated that type of indicator (simple process, compound process, and outcome) and goal interdependence were significantly linked to team effectiveness. For simple‐process indicators, reliance on top‐down standardised processes led to team effectiveness, but for outcome measures this strategy was ineffective, and even counter‐effective. For outcome measures, team‐learning was more beneficial.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the management of chronic diseases.

Originality/value

The advantage of allowing team members flexibility in the choice of the best work strategy to attain high quality diabetes care is attested.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Maurice Atkinson and Valerie Maxwell

This paper aims to present the rationale for the adoption of a performance measurement approach within a partnership setting, the process followed to develop a

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the rationale for the adoption of a performance measurement approach within a partnership setting, the process followed to develop a multi‐agency performance measurement framework, the resulting model and the associated challenges and key success factors.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a case study approach.

Findings

This paper describes the multi‐agency outcomes‐based performance measurement model used by Children's Services Planning in Northern Ireland to monitor agreed outcomes and identifies the key success factors of developing and implementing such a model.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are limited to the analysis of the development of a performance measurement approach within a single partnership.

Originality/value

This paper has contributed to the debate on performance measurement by illustrating a paradigm shift from collecting activity data on an organization by organization basis to managing information on a multi‐agency basis using indicators based on outcomes as part of an integrated performance measurement system.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Anna Gagliardi, Louise Lemieux‐Charles, Adalsteinn Brown, Terry Sullivan and Vivek Goel

The purpose of this paper is to show that performance data use could be promoted with a better understanding of the type of indicators that are important to different…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that performance data use could be promoted with a better understanding of the type of indicators that are important to different stakeholders. This study explored patient, nurse, physician and manager preferences for cancer care quality indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were held with 30 stakeholders between March and June 2004. They were asked to describe how they would use a cancer “report card”, and which indicators they would want reported. Transcripts were reviewed using qualitative analysis.

Findings

Role (patient, nurse, physician, manager) influenced preferences and perceived use of performance data. Patients and physicians were more skeptical than nurses and managers; patients and managers expressed some preferences distinct from nurses and physicians; and patients and nurses interpreted indicators more broadly than physicians and managers. All groups preferred technical process over outcome or interpersonal process indicators.

Research limitations/implications

Expressed views are not directly applicable beyond this setting, or to the general public but findings are congruent with attitudes to performance data for other conditions, and serve as a conceptual basis for further study.

Practical implications

Strategies for maximizing the relevance of performance reports might include technical process indicators, selection by multi‐stakeholder deliberation, information that facilitates information application and customizable report interfaces.

Originality/value

Performance data preferences have not been thoroughly examined, particularly in the context of cancer care. Factors were identified that influence stakeholder views of performance data, and this framework could be used to confirm findings among larger and different populations.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Carolina Elisabeth de Korte, Dirk F. de Korne, Jose P. Martinez Ciriano, J. Robert Rosenthal, Kees Sol, Niek S. Klazinga and Roland A. Bal

The purpose of this paper is to study the quality indicator appropriateness and use it for international quality comparison on diabetic retinopathy (DR) patient care…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the quality indicator appropriateness and use it for international quality comparison on diabetic retinopathy (DR) patient care process in one American and one Dutch eye hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A 17-item DR quality indicator set was composed based on a literature review and systematically applied in two hospitals. Qualitative analysis entailed document study and 12 semi-structured face-to-face interviews with ophthalmologists, managers, and board members of the two hospitals.

Findings

While the medical-clinical approach to DR treatment in both hospitals was similar, differences were found in quality of care perception and operationalization. Neither hospital systematically used outcome indicators for DR care. On the process level, the authors found larger differences. Similarities and differences were found in the structure of both hospitals. The hospitals’ particular contexts influenced the interpretation and use of quality indicators.

Practical implications

Although quality indicators and quality comparison between hospitals are increasingly used in international settings, important local differences influence their application. Context should be taken into account. Since that context is locally bound and directly linked to hospital setting, caution should be used interpreting the results of quality comparison studies.

Originality/value

International quality comparison is increasingly suggested as a useful way to improve healthcare. Little is known, however, about the appropriateness and use of quality indicators in local hospital care practices.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 55000