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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Jacqueline Scott

Uses data from 1994 International Social Survey Programme to examine how attitudes to maternal employment at different stages of child rearing vary across and within eight…

Abstract

Uses data from 1994 International Social Survey Programme to examine how attitudes to maternal employment at different stages of child rearing vary across and within eight nations in the European Union, UK, Germany, Austria, the Netherlands, Sweden, Ireland, Italy and Spain. Considers whether a mismatch exists between belief in a women’s right to work and the “traditional” family ideology. Highlights a north/south divide in attitude and differing welfare policies and gender‐role beliefs.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Manuel Joaquín Fernández González, Tamāra Pīgozne, Svetlana Surikova and Ļubova Vasečko

The relevance of institution leaders’ personal qualities for providing quality education is widely recognized. The purpose of this paper is to explore vocational education…

Abstract

Purpose

The relevance of institution leaders’ personal qualities for providing quality education is widely recognized. The purpose of this paper is to explore vocational education and training (VET) institution leaders’ character features. The research question was twofold: What are the features of the character of the pedagogical leaders of three Latvian VET institutions according to students, teachers and institution board members? What are the differences between respondents’ groups regarding their perceptions of leaders’ virtues?

Design/methodology/approach

Six members of the institution board, five teachers and six students participated in structured qualitative interviews collected in 2013 in three high-quality VET institutions from different fields (tourism, sports and maritime education). Secondary analysis of latent content was used to explore respondents’ perceptions of leaders’ virtues, using software AQUAD 7 for qualitative data analysis.

Findings

The results revealed significant differences between students’ and staff (teachers’ and institution board members’) perceptions: the staff members appreciated particularly leaders’ performance virtues (“teamwork orientation”) and intellectual virtues (“critical thinking”), whereas, for students, heads’ moral virtues were more relevant, especially “magnanimity”. Respondents also showed concern about VET institution leaders’ civic virtues (“neighborliness,” “community awareness,” and “communicability”).

Practical implications

The results suggest that different perspectives, and in particular students’ voices, should be integrated in VET leaders’ assessment process and that their continuing professional development should also address their intellectual, moral and civic virtues.

Originality/value

This study represents an innovative methodological trial for investigating educational institution heads’ leadership from the lens of virtue ethics.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Ivana Sekol and David P. Farrington

– This research examined some personal characteristics of victims of bullying in residential care for youth. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Abstract

Purpose

This research examined some personal characteristics of victims of bullying in residential care for youth. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 601 young people aged 11-21 from 22 residential facilities in Croatia completed an anonymous self-reported bullying questionnaire, the Big Five Personality Inventory, the Basic Empathy Scale and the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale.

Findings

The results demonstrated that male and female victims lacked self-esteem, presented with neurotic personality traits and were likely to believe that bullying was just part of life in residential care. Female victims also presented with lower levels of agreeableness and conscientiousness, while male victims were young and had a history of victimisation during their previous placement, in school and at the beginning of their current placements.

Practical implications

Victims in care might benefit from programmes addressing their low self-esteem, high neuroticism and attitudes approving of bullying. Male residential groups should not accommodate young boys together with older boys. New residents who have a history of victimisation during their previous placement and in school should be supervised more intensively but in a manner that does not increase their perception of being victimised.

Originality/value

The present study is the first work that examines individual characteristics of bullying victims in care institutions for young people. As such, the study offers some insights on how to protect residential care bullying victims.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2014

Louise Joly, Michelle Cornes and Jill Manthorpe

Homelessness often results from the loss of social networks and individuals are tested in being able to sustain or develop new positive social networks necessary to…

Abstract

Purpose

Homelessness often results from the loss of social networks and individuals are tested in being able to sustain or develop new positive social networks necessary to rebuild lives. The purpose of this paper is to present findings from an exploratory study which investigated how different agencies and professionals support people experiencing multiple exclusion homelessness (MEH) to develop and maintain their social networks amid other competing priorities, such as reducing substance misuse and re-offending.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was undertaken in England 2010-2011 in three case study sites. Data were collected in 76 interviews with practitioners and managers, from disciplines including housing support, social work, criminal justice, mental health and substance misuse services. Totally, 56 interviews and five focus groups were also undertaken with people with experiences of MEH. Data were analysed thematically. Data from one site in particular permitted a focus on personal relationships and social networks which were seen as beneficial but also potentially problematic. These data are drawn upon to reflect on the implications for housing providers and practitioners.

Findings

While multiple factors had often led to the loss of social networks among homeless people, findings revealed that practitioners working with homeless people may be able to promote existing social networks, such as partnerships, help develop new ones, and support people withdrawing from less positive relationships. The authors conclude that practitioners should be alert to structural changes that threaten social networks and may need to enhance skills in creating opportunities to foster existing positive relationships in direct work with their clients and in collaboration with other professionals. The need to be careful of blurring professional boundaries is also observed.

Practical implications

This paper suggests approaches that may encourage practitioner reflection and commissioning practice in achieving good outcomes for people with experiences of MEH by highlighting the importance of social networks and the potential for practitioners to foster supportive relationships.

Originality/value

This paper considers the often under-researched area of day-to-day engagement with social networks and the implications of working to support these as part of the role of homelessness services. While drawing primarily on recent research in England the themes raised will have wider relevance to housing and care services generally.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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