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Russell Schiller

British town centres are suffering from the growing trend towardsoutoftown retailing. The Continental model for the future of towncentres appears attractive, but there…

Abstract

British town centres are suffering from the growing trend towards outoftown retailing. The Continental model for the future of town centres appears attractive, but there are problems. National durable multiples face a locational dilemma – they have a commitment to town centres but wish to follow the market out of town if that is necessary. The result is that many run both town centre and outoftown operations in parallel. The three waves of retail decentralization – food, bulky goods and comparison goods‐have varying effects on different sizes of centre. Larger durable‐based town centres are likely to suffer slow attrition, but some food‐anchored district centres could suffer from new, smaller, outoftown supermarkets. There is a growing amount of leisure‐based shopping which could work to the advantage of some small market towns. The tide of outoftown retailing is running so strongly that the new tighter government policy is unlikely to stop it completely. Many town centres could contract commercially, but they could continue to prosper by encouraging housing and services.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Hassan Alzubaidi, Claudio Vignali, Barry J. Davies and Ruth A. Schmidt

Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s the debate surrounding the comparative costs and benefits of town centre and outoftown retail developments for consumers and to the…

Abstract

Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s the debate surrounding the comparative costs and benefits of town centre and outoftown retail developments for consumers and to the environment has been a heated one. Informed by a largely puritanical view of consumerism, current Government policy tends towards the preservation of the traditional town centre. However, the actual evidence is far from conclusive and there is limited consumer research supporting this stance. Based on an interviewer‐administered survey conducted during 1994 and 1995 to assess shoppers’ opinions in both types of location in Preston, presents an examination of consumer perspectives and examines differences in perceptions and behaviour patterns among town centre and outoftown shoppers.

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International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Peter Jones and David Hillier

During the past 30 years the balance between retail development in “out of town” as opposed to “town centre” locations has been a recurrent theme in retail planning policy…

Abstract

During the past 30 years the balance between retail development in “out of town” as opposed to “town centre” locations has been a recurrent theme in retail planning policy debates and policy initiatives within the UK. This paper reviews the continuing growth and diversification of outoftown retail development and draws attention to the recent investment in retail services complexes in outoftown sites. A brief outline of changing central government thinking suggests an increasingly restrictive approach to new outoftown retail development coupled with a policy commitment to “put town centres first”. The paper then offers some illustrative examples of town centre management initiatives in Leicester, Leeds and Manchester, and concludes with a brief discussion of some of the issues surrounding the “in townoutoftown debate”.

Details

Property Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Christina Tomalin and John Pal

Identifies some of the industry‐wide changes such as thedecentralization of retailing and the impact and implications for towncentres of retailing and its wider function…

Abstract

Identifies some of the industry‐wide changes such as the decentralization of retailing and the impact and implications for town centres of retailing and its wider function. Examines the recent upsurge of interest in town centre management in the context of current government planning policy guidelines and ministerial statements. Identifies the key components of successful town centres including private/public sector partnerships and funding. Demonstrates, through an examination of initiatives taken by two particular authorities, the need for a flexible interpretation of the concepts of town centre management.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Terry J. Hiller

Examines the attitude of the consumer and local authorities to outoftown shopping centres by means of results of a survey carried out in two suburbs of Bournemouth in…

Abstract

Examines the attitude of the consumer and local authorities to outoftown shopping centres by means of results of a survey carried out in two suburbs of Bournemouth in the UK. Reveals that both the consumer and local authorities have reservations about the role of outoftown shopping centres and its effect on the overall pattern of retail distribution, despite the apparent benefits of this kind of shopping.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Michael Howard

Whether the recent pressure for more outoftown shopping appearsto be easing in favour of further revitalisation of the inner citycentre is discussed by involved…

Abstract

Whether the recent pressure for more outoftown shopping appears to be easing in favour of further revitalisation of the inner city centre is discussed by involved interlocutors, both at local and at ministerial level. Amongst other relevant aspects of retail development, the pros and cons of superstores operating side by side with small businesses in town centres are examined.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Councillor A. Whitehead

Hardly a day goes by without a report about one of the great traditions of British dissent: a small group protesting at the demolition of a cottage; a lone crusader…

Abstract

Hardly a day goes by without a report about one of the great traditions of British dissent: a small group protesting at the demolition of a cottage; a lone crusader chaining him or herself to a tree to prevent its felling; or a band of enthusiasts standing in the way of a bulldozer as it attempts to fill in a duckpond. Yet that same culture, which has bred a stubborn tradition of activism in the cause of a manageable and human‐centred environment, is curiously silent in the face of a threat that will involve the demolition, potentially, of hundreds of cottages, thousands of trees and scores of duckponds. Additionally, it will involve the desecration and impoverishment of the urban landscape that city‐dwellers are only now beginning to learn is every bit as fragile and in need of care and attention as our natural heritage. This is the looming threat of the giant multi‐purpose outoftown retail centre. Whether it be for a large clear span warehouse, for a retail ‘farm’ of several similar centres selling stratified lines in bulk, or the establishment of an entire alternative High Street in the middle of nowhere, most urban centres and particularly free‐standing centres, face a plethora of applications and a wash of finance and public relations expertise in the drive to persuade, cajole or bully local authorities into accepting planning applications of monumental consequences for the established retail centres of those authorities. In South Hampshire alone there are currently 18 applications under consideration for outoftown shopping centres which together total in excess of 4,000,000 sq. ft. (To put this figure into real context, Southampton City Centre currently has 1,500,000 sq. ft of retail.)

Details

Property Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article

TERRY J. HILLIER

The fears of many consumers a few years ago concerning the apparent impersonality and size of many shopping developments, have now been largely overcome. These have been…

Abstract

The fears of many consumers a few years ago concerning the apparent impersonality and size of many shopping developments, have now been largely overcome. These have been superseded with concern for the distance and competitiveness factors associated with the latest trend in retailing — the movement ‘outoftown’ — a development which at present receives hostility from many people in the United Kingdom, and cautious enthusiasm from others.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0020-7527

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Article

Stephen Brown

Marks & Spencer's decision to go out of town is one of the most significant in the retail sector in recent years, but so far little research has been done into its…

Abstract

Marks & Spencer's decision to go out of town is one of the most significant in the retail sector in recent years, but so far little research has been done into its implications. In July 1987 Marks were granted planning permission to put up a shopping complex at Sprucefield, on the southern edge of the Belfast conurbation, and trading will probably start in December 1988. A survey into this development, of both retailers and consumers, was carried out by the Department of Marketing at the University of Ulster. The favourable views of shoppers were perhaps not all that surprising — but the support of retailers is contrary to received wisdom.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article

Olof Wahlberg

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the qualities of a small town centre and how such centres can enhance their attractiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the qualities of a small town centre and how such centres can enhance their attractiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sampling procedure was used to administer a web survey to visitors of a small Swedish town. Importance-performance analysis and statistical methods were used to analyse quality attributes and quality dimensions. Correlation analysis was run to measure the relationship between centre attractiveness and shopping loyalty.

Findings

The variety of retail outlets is what is most valued by visitors to a small town centre, followed by the provision of events and non-commercial activities and the design and maintenance of the physical environment in the centre. Surprisingly, the interpersonal behaviour has less impact on the perceived attractiveness than the aforementioned quality dimensions. Visitors’ shopping loyalty is significantly related to the perceived attractiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The study is a one-off study based upon a small Swedish town, but it is indicative of global shopping trends.

Practical implications

Implications for town centre management to enhance the attractiveness of the business district of a small town.

Social implications

Traditional town centres have been props for the surrounding societies, providing anscillary services beside retailing. When retail moves to out-of-town retail locations, this could lead to the erosion of interpersonal communications and central services for citizens.

Originality/value

Pioneering research on small Swedish town shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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