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Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2005

Orit Kamir

Anatomy of a Murder, a beloved, highly influential, seemingly liberal 1959 classic law-film seems to appropriate some of the fading western genre’s features and social…

Abstract

Anatomy of a Murder, a beloved, highly influential, seemingly liberal 1959 classic law-film seems to appropriate some of the fading western genre’s features and social functions, intertwining the professional-plot western formula with a hero-lawyer variation on the classic western hero character, America’s 19th century archetypal True Man. In so doing, Anatomy revives the western genre’s honor code, embracing it into the hero-lawyer law-film. Concurrently, it accommodates the development of cinematic imagery of the emerging, professional elite groups, offering the public the notion of the professional super-lawyer, integrating legal professionalism with natural justice. In the course of establishing its Herculean lawyer, the film constitutes its female protagonist as a potential threat, subjecting her to a cinematic judgment of her sexual character and reinforcing the honor-based notion of woman’s sexual-guilt.

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Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-327-3

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Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2005

Abstract

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-327-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2005

Abstract

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-327-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2008

Leslie J. Moran

Various law and film scholars have noted that the judge occupies the place of a marginal figure in ‘legal cinema’ and in related scholarship. In this chapter I want to…

Abstract

Various law and film scholars have noted that the judge occupies the place of a marginal figure in ‘legal cinema’ and in related scholarship. In this chapter I want to engage with the debate about the representation of the judge in film by way of an examination of a South African documentary, ‘Two Moms: A family portrait’ (2004). In the first instance this ‘family portrait’ appears to be neither an obvious candidate for inclusion in the canon of ‘legal cinema’ nor a film with a plotline dominated by a judge. But from this rather unpromising start this chapter explores how a film about an ordinary family made up of extraordinary people is an extraordinary film about law in general and about the figure of the judge in particular.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-378-1

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