Search results

1 – 10 of over 147000
Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Anna Roberts and Charlene Zietsma

What happens to nonelite workers’ meaning, belonging, and identity when work is “on-demand”? On-demand organizations, such as Uber and TaskRabbit, have ambiguous…

Abstract

What happens to nonelite workers’ meaning, belonging, and identity when work is “on-demand”? On-demand organizations, such as Uber and TaskRabbit, have ambiguous boundaries and locations of workers. This qualitative study investigated how organizational and societal boundary discourse and the organization of the work itself, constructed sometimes conflicting worker roles that influenced how ride-hailing workers understood the boundaries of the on-demand organization and their location with respect to it. The roles of app–user and driver–partner constructed ride-hailing workers as outside the boundaries of the organization, while the driver–bot role constructed them as (nonhuman) elements of organizational technology. While the driver–partner role had positive and empowering identity, meaning, and belongingness associations, its conflict with the other roles blocked these positive associations, and led to cynicism and fatalism. We reflect on the possible impacts of the on-demand economy on society, workers, and the practice of work, particularly for nonelite workers.

Details

Toward Permeable Boundaries of Organizations?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-829-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Liora Nutov and Orit Hazzan

– The purpose of this paper is to present an organizational engagement model that highlights the design process of the homeroom teacher (HRT) role in Israeli high schools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an organizational engagement model that highlights the design process of the homeroom teacher (HRT) role in Israeli high schools.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was constructed as a grounded theory during a qualitative research work conducted during 2007-2011.

Findings

The model is based on Maslow's and Schein's frameworks of personal needs and organizational culture, respectively, as well as on the principal's role.

Originality/value

The authors propose that the model contributes to the literature on organizational behavior and leadership in general and to the study of educational organizations in particular, in three ways: first, it stresses the principal's role in the design process of leadership roles; second, it deepens the understanding of the concept of engagement by examining it through a qualitative lens; and third, it suggests a hierarchical organizational engagement ladder for the HRT role.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Neil Brewer, Patricia Mitchell and Nathan Weber

This study examined the relationship among biological sex, gender role, organizational status, and conflict management behavior of males and females in three similar…

5873

Abstract

This study examined the relationship among biological sex, gender role, organizational status, and conflict management behavior of males and females in three similar organizations. Individuals (N = 118) from upper and lower status organizational positions completed the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory‐II, in the context of two recalled organizational conflicts (Rahim, 1983a), and the Bern Sex Role Inventory (Bern, 1974). After controlling for biological sex, when compared with other gender roles masculine individuals were highest on the dominating conflict style, whereas feminine individuals were highest on the avoiding style, and androgynous individuals on the integrating style. Further, upper organizational status individuals were higher on the integrating style, while lower status individuals reported greater use of avoiding and obliging styles.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Henry Mutebi, Moses Muhwezi, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi, Samuel Ssekajja Mayanja and John C. Kigozi Munene

Organisations involved in relief delivery tend to have cross-boundary mandates, which cause ambiguity of roles during delivery of relief services to the targeted victims…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations involved in relief delivery tend to have cross-boundary mandates, which cause ambiguity of roles during delivery of relief services to the targeted victims. Having no clear role, specialisation affects service timeliness and increases resource duplication among the relief organisations. The objective of this study is to understand how organisational networks and organisational learning as complex adaptive system metaphors improve both organisational adaptability and role clarity in humanitarian logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

Using ordinary partial least squares regression through SmartPLS version 3.3.3, the authors tested the study hypotheses basing on survey data collected from 315 respondents who were selected randomly to complete a self-administered questionnaire from 101 humanitarian organisations. Common method bias (CMB) associated with surveys was minimised by implementing both procedural and post statistics methods.

Findings

The results indicate that organisational networks and organisational learning have a significant influence on organisational adaptability and role clarity. The results also show that organisational adaptability partially mediates in the relationship between organisational networks, organisational learning and role clarity.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of the study is that the authors have used cross-sectional data to test this research hypotheses. However, this was minimised following Guide and Ketokivi's (2015) recommendation on how to address the limitations of cross-sectional data or the use of longitudinal data that can address CMB and endogeneity problems.

Practical implications

Managers in humanitarian organisations can use the authors’ framework to understand, first, how complex adaptive system competence can be used to create organisational adaptability and, second, how organisational adaptability can help organisational networks and organisational learning in improving role clarity among humanitarian organisations by collaboratively working together.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the existing body of knowledge in humanitarian logistics and supply chain management by empirically testing the anecdotal and conceptual evidence. The findings may be useful to managers who are contemplating the use of organisational networks, organisational learning and organisational adaptability to improve role clarity in disaster relief-related activities.

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2019

Swati Dhir and Archana Shukla

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of organizational image in engaging employees and improving their performance. The study has explored the role of…

1475

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of organizational image in engaging employees and improving their performance. The study has explored the role of employee’s perception about the organizational image, and its linkage with the investment of employee’s energies into their work roles resulting in employee engagement (EE) and hence performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a model that was built on the basis of research conducted in the form of surveys. By using cross-sectional data and following a quantitative research method, the study collected data from 701 managers in India holding various positions, in different industries. The study has used “Component-Based Structural Equation Modeling” by Smart PLS.

Findings

The key findings of the study help employees as well as employers to have a thorough, comprehensive understanding to improve EE and their performance by creating a positive and consistent organizational image.

Research limitations/implications

This study will be very useful for employers and policymakers to understand the value of organizational image in engaging the workforce effectively. Aligning with the organizational behaviors theoretical support, this study yields some important and useful suggestions for managers to engage and retain their workforce in the present dynamic work environment.

Originality/value

The paper tries to focus on one’s perceptions of the organization and its linkage between EE and performance. The positive perception of employees reflects that they identify themselves and feel connected with the overall vision of the organization.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Louise Kippist and Anneke Fitzgerald

This article aims to examine tensions between hybrid clinician managers' professional values and health care organisations' management objectives.

4757

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to examine tensions between hybrid clinician managers' professional values and health care organisations' management objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are from interviews conducted with, and observation of, 14 managerial participants in a Cancer Therapy Unit set in a large teaching hospital in New South Wales, Australia, who participated in a Clinical Leadership Development Program.

Findings

The data indicate that there are tensions experienced by members of the health care organisation when a hybrid clinician manager appears to abandon the managerial role for the clinical role. The data also indicate that when a hybrid clinician manager takes on a managerial role other members of the health care organisation are required concomitantly to increase their clinical roles.

Research limitations/implications

Although the research was represented by a small sample and was limited to one department of a health care organisation, it is possible that other members of health care organisations experience similar situations when they work with hybrid clinician managers. Other research supports the findings. Also, this paper reports on data that emerged from a research project that was evaluating a Clinical Leadership Development Program. The research was not specifically focused on organisational professional conflict in health care organisations.

Practical implications

This paper shows that the role of the hybrid clinician manager may not bring with it the organisational effectiveness that the role was perceived to have. Hybrid clinician managers abandoning their managerial role for their clinical role may mean that some managerial work is not done. Increasing the workload of other clinical members of the health care organisation may not be optimal for the health care organisation.

Originality/value

Organisational professional conflict, as a result of hybridity and divergent managerial and clinical objectives, can cause conflict which affects other organisational members and this conflict may have implications for the efficiency of the health care organisation. The extension or duality of organisational professional conflict that causes interpersonal or group conflict in other members of the organisation, to the authors' knowledge, has not yet been researched.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Carlos Martin-Rios

The purpose of this paper is to examine through a sensemaking lens the transforming nature of scientists’ work role in public research organizations (PROs), resulting from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine through a sensemaking lens the transforming nature of scientists’ work role in public research organizations (PROs), resulting from organizational innovations in the form of collaborative culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a symbolic-functionalist theory of work role transition, the paper uses interview data from a case study to explore scientists’ sensemaking of work role change.

Findings

Work role transition and identity processes among scientists in traditional PROs reveal tensions regarding organizational restructuring to the extent that organizational innovations are changing scientific work conflict with organizational norms, procedures and reward structures in hierarchical, bureaucratic PROs.

Research limitations/implications

As the paper is based on only one case study, further research should be carried out on the difficulties involved in transforming the nature of the scientific work role and the way scientists recognize, contradict and make sense of changes.

Originality/value

The novelty of this paper is in the un-discussed role of organizational innovations in enabling new work roles for scientists in public research centers and how scientists make sense of and react to these innovations. Therefore, this paper could be beneficial for PROs facing pressure to restructure.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Cathrine Filstad

This study examines how newcomers use colleagues as role models in organizational socialization, taking a multiple level approach to organizational socialization as…

5506

Abstract

This study examines how newcomers use colleagues as role models in organizational socialization, taking a multiple level approach to organizational socialization as individual, social and cultural learning processes. The newcomers' most important personal characteristics are expectations, experience, self‐confidence and competitive instinct. These personal characteristics were affected by early experience during the first four to six weeks in their new job. The study shows not only the correlation between early experience and personal characteristics, but also reveals a strong correlation between early experience and organizational socialization outcome. Newcomers rely on role models, and as a result of interaction and observation they acquire different qualifications from several role models. The term “multiple contingent role models” is introduced to explain how newcomers use role models.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Marianne D. Sison

The purpose of this paper is to reconceptualize public relations roles, particularly the organizational conscience role, by examining practitioner involvement in…

1952

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reconceptualize public relations roles, particularly the organizational conscience role, by examining practitioner involvement in organizational value setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Australian communication practitioners were interviewed to ascertain practitioner involvement in organizational value setting. The interview results were subjected to a multiple perspective analysis, which was used to develop a new framework for public relations roles.

Findings

The research found that most respondents were involved in organizational value setting, albeit at the implementation stage. The results also showed the potential for practitioners to extend their involvement to a more leadership‐oriented critical inquiry role. Based on this analysis, this paper proposes three agency roles: agency of corporate compliance, agency of concertive control, and an agency of critical conscience.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample of Australian respondents and the novel approach used to analyse public relations roles require further research. The results offer new ways for practitioners to enact the conscience role through dialectical inquiry.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for embedding dialectical inquiry in public relations roles, and for integrating leadership into the technician‐manager role typology.

Originality/value

The paper examines practitioner involvement in organizational value setting through a multiple perspective lens and introduces a new public relations roles framework.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

A.G. Sheard and A.P. Kakabadse

This monograph seeks to summarise the key influences of a role‐based perspective on leadership when making decisions as to how organisational resources can best be deployed.

6552

Abstract

Purpose

This monograph seeks to summarise the key influences of a role‐based perspective on leadership when making decisions as to how organisational resources can best be deployed.

Design/methodology/approach

Application of new frameworks provides insight into the leadership roles executives can adopt when part of formal, informal and temporary groups within the organisation's senior management team and those parts of the organisation for which they are responsible. The methodology adopted is qualitative, focusing on application of previously developed frameworks.

Findings

Adoption of an appropriate leadership role, and the timely switch from one role to another as circumstances change, are found to facilitate improvement in the ability of executives to mobilise organisational resources, and in so doing effectively address those challenges with which the organisation is faced.

Research limitations/implications

A one‐organisation intensive case study of a multinational engineering company engaged in the design, development and manufacture of rotating turbomachinery provides the platform for the research. The research intent is to validate two frameworks in a different organisation of a similar demographic profile to those in which the frameworks were developed. The frameworks will require validating in organisations of different demographic profiles.

Practical implications

The concepts advanced, and implications discussed, provide an insight into the role‐based nature of leadership. The practical steps individual executives can take to develop their ability to adopt different leadership roles are highlighted.

Originality/value

This monograph is an investigation into, and study of the contribution of theory that provides insight into, the process by which executives effectively mobilise organisational resources. This differs from the original contributions to theory, which focused on methodology, data gathering and validation in contrast with the current study that is focused on practical application.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 147000