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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2010

Chang‐Hun Lee, Jung‐Mi Kim and Jong‐Gil Kim

The aim of the current study is three‐fold: it aims to empirically investigates the relationship between officers' perceptions on organizational structure and preventive…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the current study is three‐fold: it aims to empirically investigates the relationship between officers' perceptions on organizational structure and preventive policing practices (PPP) in the South Korean context; it attempts to find what aspects of organizational characteristics will be influential in police officers' day‐to‐day activities;, utilizing structural equation modeling (SEM), it aims to identitify the complex networks of influences among various organizational aspects.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study utilizes data collected from two different samples: a total of 146 randomly selected police officers in a metropolitan police agency, and 60 police officers who were attending a community policing training course. Overall response rate was 73.6 percent. The organizational characteristics investigated include strategic direction, decentralization of authority, system flexibility, reward system, and open‐system feedback mechanism.

Findings

The results of SEM indicate that officers' perceptions on organizational structure (except open‐system feedback mechanism) of Korean police agency do not influence an individual police officer's preventive policing activity. The study found a significant relationship between officers' perceptions on open‐system structure and preventive policing practice. Finally, the study also identified a complex network of organizational traits on preventive policing: strategic direction influences all other organizational factors; system flexibility is a prerequisite for the open system; and decentralization of authority influences the open system structure.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study uniquely utilized organizational factors measured at the individual level, one may criticize the lack of a more direct organizational measure, such as organizational size, age, task scope, or number of ranks. Future study on this topic will benefit from employing both direct and indirect organizational measures.

Originality/value

The current study enhances the understanding of individual perception of organizational characteristics on police officers' day‐to‐day preventive policing activities.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Chang‐Hun Lee and Hyunseok Jang

This study aimed to identify a model investigating effects of organizational characteristics on COP activity, and to compare the model in different social contexts to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to identify a model investigating effects of organizational characteristics on COP activity, and to compare the model in different social contexts to broaden the understanding of COP implementation. In addition, this study was intended to address an ecological fallacy committed in the prior studies so as to carry out a theoretically and methodologically rigorous comparative study of COP implementation between South Korea and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Unlike prior studies, which utilized direct measures of organizational characteristics, this study analyzed data on police officers' perceptions on organizational characteristics to investigate COP activities among police officers. For data collection, this study utilized an organizational survey developed by the School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University and collected data from 206 police officers in South Korea and 231 police officers in the USA. Structural equation modeling was used to identify the best fitting model to the combined data set, and multiple group analysis was performed to compare the model in both countries. For direct comparison and test of comparability, this study used matching for sampling and multiple group analysis method of SEM.

Findings

Findings indicated that both organizational flexibility and decentralization were important factors influencing COP activity in the USA, but decentralization of authority was the only important factor affecting COP activity in South Korea. Also, it was found that organizational philosophy had greater influence on organizational structure in the USA than in South Korea. In both countries, decentralization influenced feedback mechanism, but feedback mechanism did not influence COP activity. Likewise, flexibility influenced reward system, but the system did not influence COP activity in both countries.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study utilized matching and multiple group analysis for comparison between two countries, it may be possible that direct comparison regarding police organization would be difficult due to unmeasured aspects of organizational contexts.

Originality/value

Although many studies have been conducted to investigate effects of organizational factors on COP implementation, there has been a lack of study in South Korea. In addition, there is a vacuum of empirical study on comparison across different countries regarding the factors. In this sense, this study produced important comparative knowledge on COP implementation.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Geoff Berry

There is emerging evidence that leadership is an indispensable element in the process of initiating and sustaining the development of a quality culture in organizations…

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Abstract

There is emerging evidence that leadership is an indispensable element in the process of initiating and sustaining the development of a quality culture in organizations. Such leadership is of particular importance to schools, where cultural, political and organizational factors make the management of quality problematic. For leaders to make decisions about the development of quality culture within their schools they require a thorough understanding of the theoretical basis of current approaches to quality management in education. In an effort to contribute to this theoretical understanding, considers the paradigm of total quality management (TQM) as a broad philosophy for the development of quality culture in schools. Describes how TQM is being identified increasingly as a viable paradigm for the development of a quality culture in school education and has been the focus for improvement efforts in individual schools internationally and in school districts, particularly in the USA.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Satish Mehra

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of successfully assessing basic resources of an organization, such as technology and human resources, needed to enhance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of successfully assessing basic resources of an organization, such as technology and human resources, needed to enhance performance of service businesses through the use of quality management ideals. Effective coordination of these two types of organizational assets is shown to impact both the design and the implementation of quality management practices, which than leads to enhanced organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Retail banking firms were surveyed for this study to analyze empirical data related to technology and people-based assets. Results were corroborated on the basis of in-depth interviews with several banking managers to provide real-world verification of the findings.

Findings

This study identifies the significance of key assets in a banking service environment that can help the implementation of quality management philosophy. Paper discusses how managers can focus on the development of key assets as well as the use of these assets in the design of quality management processes to enhance business performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research focused on a specific sector of the service industry, the banking sector. Relatively small size of the study sample may have impacted the outcome of research applicability on a wide spectrum of businesses. Also, constantly changing financial regulations could not be incorporated in the study. On the positive side, strong managerial feedback provides guidance toward adopting the study results, and lays the foundation for future research suggesting an additional focus on corporate responsibility and sustainability issues while managing quality.

Originality/value

As today’s rapidly evolving society pushes people out of service encounters, replacing them with efficient and cost-saving technology, roles of both the people and the technology in an organization must be fully understood. This paper shows that, despite the exponential growth of technological innovation, both people and technology are critical to enhancing organizational performance through successful adoption of quality management practices.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Victoria S. Licuanan, Kaushik Sengupta and James P. Neelankavil

The purpose of this paper was to analyze the level of innovation and entrepreneurial culture among Asian multinationals, especially as they face intense competition from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to analyze the level of innovation and entrepreneurial culture among Asian multinationals, especially as they face intense competition from large global companies. Past practices and the sense that Asian companies are followers rather than innovators have resulted in the persistent belief that these companies are not sufficiently innovative and do not support or promote an entrepreneurial culture. However, given the rapid development in Asian economies in recent years, it is useful to analyze whether such traditional views and practices are changing and whether employees in these organizations view innovation as a necessary tool.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study came from a survey of 193 executives (32.2 per cent response rate). The statements in the survey instrument were designed to measure aspects of three factors, namely, organizational philosophy, corporate support and human capital, for the practice of entrepreneurship and innovation in their companies. The results were analyzed through standard statistical techniques such as factor loadings, correlation analysis, analysis of variance and post hoc tests.

Findings

While Asian companies traditionally are viewed as followers rather than innovators in entrepreneurship and innovation, it is clear from this study that this perception is changing at least for the three countries in this study with the prevalence and continued growth of the globalized economy. While the main results show an overall trend of increasing innovation and entrepreneurship culture, there are some major differences among specific factors. Specifically, the three countries are not the same across all the factors. This could be partly attributed to the cultural differences among these countries. In conclusion, the implications of the results from this study add to the extant research in this area.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this paper is the sample, which is obviously restricted to three countries. In addition, some of the factors need further examination for a more complete understanding of their relationship to entrepreneurship and innovation. In addition, longitudinal analysis can examine the patterns in time-based trends for these companies.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for Asian multinationals to achieve growth in a highly competitive global environment where their traditional “followers” mentality limits them from competing with global competitors who are practicing entrepreneurship and innovation.

Originality/value

For the first time, this study has shown that Asian multinationals are attempting to be innovative and use the corporate entrepreneurship as a means to compete with global companies.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Robert E. Morgan

Provides a review of the nature of marketing. In order to explicate this work, presents marketing as a concept, management philosophy and organizational function…

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7824

Abstract

Provides a review of the nature of marketing. In order to explicate this work, presents marketing as a concept, management philosophy and organizational function. Acknowledges the contribution of key authors in the field, such as Alderson, Bagozzi, Houston, Hunt and Sheth, and pays attention to the nature of developments in marketing. Provides illustration to the evolution of marketing as a discipline with specific regard to the theoretical foundations of the subject matter. Draws various conclusions and makes certain implications as to the future of marketing.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 34 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Soft Side of Knowledge Management in Health Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-925-6

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Gerard Masdeu Yélamos, Catherine Carty, Úna Moynihan and Breda ODwyer

The purpose of this paper is to present the development and validation of the Universal Transformational Management Framework (UTMF), an entrepreneurial tool that guides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the development and validation of the Universal Transformational Management Framework (UTMF), an entrepreneurial tool that guides the development of inclusion-driven strategic management, planning and practice in sport organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of qualitative data collection techniques was undertaken in this action research: seven cross-sectoral semi-structured interviews; one focus group with sports professionals; a qualitative survey and research group consultations. A matrix analysis, a thematic analysis and secondary research were undertaken to analyze data.

Findings

The UTMF is a staged framework that embeds principles of behavioral, organizational and transformative change theory, guiding strategic development toward inclusion from a contemplation phase toward an action and maintenance stage. The UTMF is composed of 14 fundamental components identified as key areas that sport entrepreneurs should recognize and address for planning and delivering sport services that leave no one behind.

Practical implications

Policy makers, management and sport professionals have at their disposal an inclusion-driven framework that challenges their systems and establish mechanisms to leave no one behind.

Social implications

Organizational transformation can ultimately produce a contagion effect advancing equality and inclusion in society. The UTMF offers a structure for sport entrepreneurs aiming to facilitate and activate social transformation in and through sport.

Originality/value

The UTMF is a wide-ranging framework to facilitate an orchestrated transformation of sport organizations in order to provide universal services that include marginalized groups and address global challenges identified in intersectional agendas like the SDGs.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Michael McShane

This paper aims to investigate the evolution of enterprise risk management (ERM) out of fragmented disciplinary perspectives to provide a foundation for promoting…

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2788

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the evolution of enterprise risk management (ERM) out of fragmented disciplinary perspectives to provide a foundation for promoting interdisciplinary research and proposes a design science approach for more effective ERM implementation in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper synthesizes ERM research and practice from multiple disciplines.

Findings

Corporate risk management concepts were born in academic finance and developed further in the finance subset known as risk management and insurance. With the advent of ERM, efforts must broaden beyond applying statistical models to quantifiable risks. Other disciplines have expanded ERM research by embracing techniques to investigate risk management practices to produce knowledge that integrates practice and theory. ERM is promoted as integrated risk management, yet silos still remain in both practice and research.

Originality/value

This study provides a foundation and a proposal for moving ERM past academic and organizational silos, which is necessary to achieve the ERM philosophy and increase organizational resilience. Understanding the evolution and fragmented nature of ERM research and practice provides a foundation for interdisciplinary cooperation necessary to achieve the holistic ERM philosophy. A next frontier is effective ERM implementation. This paper argues for an organizational design science approach for mitigating the resistance to change that confounds effective implementation of ERM in organizations facing an increasingly uncertain environment and outlines future research for applying the approach to implementing the ISO 31000 risk management process.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 17 January 2019

Poonam Singh

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights toward the potential of lean healthcare organization for environment sustainability and develop propositions for future studies.

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1169

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights toward the potential of lean healthcare organization for environment sustainability and develop propositions for future studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper to study the inbuilt capacity of lean healthcare organization to mitigate environmental footprint. As a result, lean compatibility with environmental sustainability (ES) has been explored in areas like manufacturing, supply chain, aviation, construction, etc. The lean philosophy, lean culture and lean tools were analyzed to identify their contribution to ES in the context of healthcare organizations.

Findings

Based on the analysis of lean philosophy, culture and tool, this paper theorizes that lean healthcare organizations have huge potential to mitigate environmental footprints. Lean healthcare organizations need not to do any extra effort for ES albeit it is inbuilt in it. Lean philosophy provides a vision to the healthcare organization for ES whereas lean culture bestow healthcare with an epistemology for the same.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides insight that ES is embedded in lean healthcare organizations. Lean healthcare organizational culture is ideal for application for constructivism theory where employees construct a new knowledge from their experiences to minimize the waste that eventually help in ES.

Originality/value

Major contributions of the study include a new approach for mitigating the environmental footprints by adopting lean in healthcare organization.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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