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Article
Publication date: 6 June 1997

Mary Jo Hatch and Majken Schultz

Addresses the relationship between organizational culture, identity and image. Argues that contemporary organizations need to define their corporate identity as a bridge…

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39793

Abstract

Addresses the relationship between organizational culture, identity and image. Argues that contemporary organizations need to define their corporate identity as a bridge between the external position of the organization in its marketplace and other relevant environments, and internal meanings formed within the organizational culture. Offers an analytical framework using the concepts of organizational culture, identity and image and suggests implications, including the need for symbolic management in and of the organization and the need to combine knowledge from the disciplines of marketing and organization studies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 31 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

Faisal Babu and Sam Thomas

Total quality management (TQM) has been a universally applienod management strategy to improve organizational performance and thereby to achieve competitiveness. Compared…

Abstract

Purpose

Total quality management (TQM) has been a universally applienod management strategy to improve organizational performance and thereby to achieve competitiveness. Compared with the scholarly and practical attention paid to identify the consequences of implementing TQM practices, little is known about how those practices enhance organizational image and employee satisfaction. This paper aims to address that research gap and is designed to empirically prove the relationship between TQM practices, organizational image and employee satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based survey of 285 employees including administrators, managers and heads of departments of 21 National Accreditation Board for Hospital and Healthcare providers-accredited hospitals in India was conducted. The proposed research model was tested using partial least squares based structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results revealed that TQM practices have positive direct and indirect effects on employee satisfaction, confirming the partial mediation role played by organizational image in the relationship between TQM practices and employee satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

From the findings, leaders can understand that by implementing TQM practices, organizations can enhance image of the organization and bring high level of employee satisfaction.

Originality/value

The study tries to answer questions largely ignored in the TQM literature: the effect of TQM practices on organizational image and employee satisfaction, and the mediating role of organizational image on TQM practices and employee satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Raghda Abulsaoud Ahmed Younis and Rasha Hammad

Although researchers agreed that corporate image and employer image are important factors affecting organizational attractiveness, understanding the role of social…

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1583

Abstract

Purpose

Although researchers agreed that corporate image and employer image are important factors affecting organizational attractiveness, understanding the role of social identity within the attracting process, in addition to exploring the relationship between corporate image and employer image, is still a research gap. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the effect of corporate and employer image on organizational attractiveness in addition to understanding the moderating role of social identity on the relationship between corporate image and employer brand and organizational attractiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a survey method for data collection from fourth year students.

Findings

The findings show that both employer image and corporate image have a significant positive effect on organizational attractiveness . In addition, it has showed that social identity consciousness plays partial role as a moderator in the model.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first papers that include corporate image, employer image, social identity consciousness and organizational attractiveness in the same model . In addition, it is one of the limited papers that considered both signal and social identity theory in attraction process.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Jorge A. Gonzalez and Subhajit Chakraborty

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of perceived external image and similarity in values, beliefs and interests with an organization's leaders and other…

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2048

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of perceived external image and similarity in values, beliefs and interests with an organization's leaders and other members on organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents results of a field survey research in two non‐work organizational contexts, a professional association, and a college business fraternity. Hypotheses were tested with ordinary least squares regression and mediation analyses.

Findings

Perceived external image and perceived similarity with the organization's leaders and other members influence organizational identification. Perceived similarity partially mediates the relationship between external image and identification.

Research limitations/implications

The study implements a cross‐sectional design and relies on self‐reports. The results have important implications for organizational identification and related behaviors both in work and non‐work contexts.

Practical implications

The study presents implications for enhancing member identification with an organization, which is related to increased involvement and continued membership. A positive external image may increase the likelihood that organizational members internalize values, beliefs and interests held by the organization's leaders and other members.

Originality/value

The study is based on a model of identity orientation that differentiates across personal, relational, and collective orientations. It measures perceived similarity with social referents in values, beliefs and interests, and study traditionally overlooked non‐work contexts.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Brian D. Lyons and Janet H. Marler

This study aims to investigate whether organizational image: mediates the relationship between web site attributes and organizational attraction and moderates the…

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4019

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether organizational image: mediates the relationship between web site attributes and organizational attraction and moderates the relationship between person‐job (P‐J) fit and organizational attraction.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 320 observations were collected from 80 senior‐level undergraduates, each half navigating a different set of four actual organizational web sites.

Findings

Organizational image was found to fully mediate the relationship between a web site's aesthetic features and organizational attraction; and moderate the relationship between P‐J fit perceptions and organizational attraction such that the change in organizational attraction was more sensitive to perceptions of P‐J fit when organizational image perceptions were more unfavorable rather than favorable. In addition, intercept differences revealed that individuals with below average P‐J fit were more attracted to organizations having a favorable image than an unfavorable image.

Practical implications

Findings underscore the importance of the positive relationship between organizational image and organizational attraction. In addition, organizations should assess applicant reactions to their web page, as it relates to perceptions and attitudes toward the organization.

Originality/value

This study integrates the web environment with two of the strongest antecedents to organizational attraction, organizational image and perceived P‐J fit.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Eran Vigoda‐Gadot, Hedva Vinarski‐Peretz and Eyal Ben‐Zion

This paper reports on two separate studies (S1, n = 169; S2, n = 224) that were designed to examine the relationship between organizational image, perceptions of workplace…

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3645

Abstract

This paper reports on two separate studies (S1, n = 169; S2, n = 224) that were designed to examine the relationship between organizational image, perceptions of workplace politics, and an additional set of job related variables (i.e. job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and job autonomy). The paper suggests that perceptions of politics have never been examined in relation to organizational image, despite the fact that both concepts are closely related to more general ideas of climate and atmosphere in and around the workplace. For this purpose, a structural equation modeling with LISREL 8.30 was used to compare three alternative models in each of the studies. Findings reveal that the first model, where perceptions of politics function as antecedents of satisfaction and commitment that have an impact on organizational image, fitted the data best. The article concludes that perceptions of politics may have an important initial impact on the formation of organizational image via other job attitudes. Relevant implications for future studies in this area are discussed.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Philip H. Siegel and Seleshi Sisaye

Addresses the relationship between organizational identification and organizational commitment. Tested the following three hypotheses in relation to professional…

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2173

Abstract

Addresses the relationship between organizational identification and organizational commitment. Tested the following three hypotheses in relation to professional accountants: self‐image congruence has a direct effect on organizational identification; organizational identification has a direct effect on organizational commitment; and the organizational‐identification effect on commitment is moderated by attitudes of significant others, work abilities/experience, other options and alternatives, competing motives, and perception of outcomes. Four international Certified Public Accountant (CPA) firms participated in the study. A random sample of 335 CPAs within these firms was selected and a survey questionnaire was mailed to them. Results did not provide support for any of the hypotheses. Instead, the results show that self‐image congruence may have a direct effect on organizational commitment, which in turn may have a direct effect on organizational identification.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Luca Cian and Sara Cervai

Currently, in the literature, words such as “corporate image”, “projected image”, “construed image”, “reputation”, “organizational identity”, and “organizational culture”…

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3155

Abstract

Purpose

Currently, in the literature, words such as “corporate image”, “projected image”, “construed image”, “reputation”, “organizational identity”, and “organizational culture” are often confused and superimposed. This creates a conceptual mismatch that leads to results that are hard to compare. Moreover, this leads to difficulty in individuating the correct tools to investigate these constructs. Part of this confusion is due to the lack of a framework shared by different literatures. The aim of this paper is firstly to propose a reasoned review of the literatures related to these constructs. Secondly, the authors propose a new framework and a standard terminology, in which reputation is the wider construct that includes and relates to the others.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed an extensive and multidisciplinary review in the 12 most used databases within corporate communication, organizational psychology, marketing, organizational studies, management, and business. A semiotic and relational approach was implemented as modus operandi.

Findings

The paper builds on the previous literature, clarifying labels and constructs and identifying a standard terminology to which future studies can refer in order to facilitate a multidisciplinary dialog along different disciplines.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review to take into consideration all of the seven constructs together and relate them within one framework. Moreover, it uses a novel approach in seeing “reputation” as an umbrella construct under which all the other constructs are grouped and included.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 October 2021

Ching-Chiao Yang, Po-Lin Lai and Xiaonan Zhu

In the past few decades, the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has received substantial interest in the competitive business environment. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

In the past few decades, the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has received substantial interest in the competitive business environment. This study aims to empirically examine the impact of CSR on corporate image, organizational commitment and organizational performance in ocean freight forwarders.

Design/methodology/approach

Five critical CSR dimensions were identified based on factor analysis: consumer interests, employee interests, environmental management, disclosure and corporate commitment and sponsorship. Structural equation modelling was subsequently performed to examine the hypothesized relationships among CSR, corporate image, organizational commitment and organizational performance.

Findings

Results indicated that CSR had significantly positive effects on corporate image and organizational commitment, whereas corporate image was positively related to organizational commitment and organizational performance, respectively. Organizational commitment was also positively related to organizational performance. However, CSR did not have a significant direct effect on organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

This study intended to conduct a survey on logistics service providers; however, due to the limited availability of research on ocean freight forwarding service providers, the present sample was limited to ocean freight forwarding enterprises.

Originality/value

From a theoretical perspective, this study contributes to the field by identifying the important dimensions of CSR and their effects on corporate image, organizational commitment and organizational performance. Particularly, it demonstrated the effect of CSR on ocean freight forwarding employees’ organizational commitment.

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Silvia Pereira de Castro Casa Nova, Isabel Costa Lourenço and Renato Ferreira LeitãoAzevedo

This study aims to analyse the impacts of an institutional change process on a specific higher education institution in Europe and the trade-offs between the faculty…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse the impacts of an institutional change process on a specific higher education institution in Europe and the trade-offs between the faculty perceptions of success and the organization image during this process, in light of the identity institutional theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The impacts of this institutional change are analysed and discussed based on in-depth interviews conducted with faculty members of the accounting department in which they reflected upon academic success vis-a-vis the career assessment system adopted, followed up by those faculty members’ answering an electronic questionnaire about organizational identity and image perception (Gioia et al., 2000).

Findings

Considering the individual perspectives, faculty are concerned about their vocations and aspirations, with feelings of apprehension and insecurity, perceiving the institutional goals as too high and potentially unattainable. By shifting the priority towards research, costs in terms of losing the institutional excellence in teaching might arise, which has been traditionally keen to the institute’s organizational identity and consistent with faculty’s perceptions of academic success.

Research limitations/implications

As in any research endeavour, some limitations might emerge. First, the authors addressed the context of a specific business school, in a European country. It is certainly true that culture plays a role in terms of both organizational and national levels. The authors acknowledge this as a limitation. Nevertheless, this research takes a “local” stance, the logic of academic evaluation and its impacts on institutional and individual identity formation processes is a worldwide phenomenon. Second, in defining the authors’ selection criteria, the authors excluded the possibility of other voices to be heard, both in the department itself and in the business school. Regarding the department, the authors argue that those are the ones who could influence future decisions, considering that they are the only ones eligible for the governing bodies under the institute’s regulations. Regarding the business school, adding other department(s) means adding other discipline(s) to the authors’ analysis with specific and different dynamics of researching, publishing and teaching, which also impacts the expectations regarding career and academic success.

Practical implications

First, before beginning an institutional change process, it is necessary to assess the vocations and aspirations of its members. The solution requires to reanalyse academic career premises and to reconsider the weights given to each academic activity, or furthermore, to offer more than one career path, so as to make it flexible for each faculty to follow their vocations and aspirations or to adapt to life demands. Second, in terms of organizational identity and image, the challenge is to minimize the gap between the construed external image and the internal identity, striving to achieve a balance between teaching, research, outreach and service.

Originality/value

Because of the nature of the academic work, the authors propose that the application of the theory should be preceded by a careful consideration of what is academic success. The misalignments studied and reported here reveal a multilevel phenomenon, wherein individual academic identities are often in conflict with the institutional image. The authors’ study entails a contribution to the application of the identity institutional theory to academic institutions.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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