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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2020

Taibo Chen, Shuaikang Hao, Kaifang Ding, Xiaodong Feng, Gendao Li and Xiao Liang

Building on organizational support theory and social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to study the impact of organizational support on employee performance…

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1517

Abstract

Purpose

Building on organizational support theory and social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to study the impact of organizational support on employee performance (EP) in the context of flexible manufacturing. In particular, the authors aimed to investigate the mediating role of employee attitude between organizational support and EP, and the moderating role of organizational justice (OJ).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 180 participants from 36 work teams employed in 7 large automotive manufacturing enterprises in China were surveyed using a questionnaire designed by the authors. Multiple linear regressions were used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results revealed four new performance indicators of frontline workers in the context of flexible manufacturing: continuous learning, teamwork, problem solving and active work. Organizational support can be divided into reinforcing support and inhibitive support. Reinforcing organizational support has a positive effect on new performance of frontline workers, and a sense of belonging plays a strong mediating role between them. Inhibitive organizational support plays an important role in the sense of awe (SA) of employees, but the SA has no influence on new performance of frontline workers. OJ plays a strong moderating role between organizational support and employee attitudes.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first attempts to explore the performance of frontline workers in the context of flexible manufacturing and contributes to the existing literature on the relationship between organizational support and EP.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2017

Sizwe Timothy Phakathi

This chapter examines the changing nature of frontline supervision in light of the supervisory training and development programme which was provided to shift-bosses in…

Abstract

This chapter examines the changing nature of frontline supervision in light of the supervisory training and development programme which was provided to shift-bosses in order to complement the workplace change processes that AfricaGold embarked on to improve operational efficiency, productivity and safety of its mining operations. Although the training course was an important workplace change initiative taken by top management to improve organisational, individual and team performance at the rock-face where it mattered most, lack of organisational and managerial support prevented frontline supervisors from effectively implementing what they learned on the training course. The chapter highlights the importance of not only providing organisational change-focused training, but also systematically and strategically involving frontline supervisors in the conceptualisation, design, execution and evaluation of workplace change initiatives. It is only when frontline supervisors are supported, managerially and organisationally, that they can be deal-makers rather than deal-breakers for a successful introduction and execution of change initiatives on the shop-floor.

Details

Production, Safety and Teamwork in a Deep-Level Mining Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-564-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Avinandan Mukherjee and Neeru Malhotra

Role clarity of frontline staff is critical to their perceptions of service quality in call centres. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of role clarity…

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6780

Abstract

Purpose

Role clarity of frontline staff is critical to their perceptions of service quality in call centres. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of role clarity and its antecedents and consequences on employee‐perceived service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model, based on the job characteristics model and cognitive theories, is proposed. Key antecedents of role clarity considered here are feedback, autonomy, participation, supervisory consideration, and team support; while key consequences are organizational commitment, job satisfaction and service quality. An internal marketing approach is adopted and all variables are measured from the frontline employee's perspective. A structural equation model is developed and tested on a sample of 342 call centre representatives of a major commercial bank in the UK.

Findings

The research reveals that role clarity plays a critical role in explaining employee perceptions of service quality. Further, the research findings indicate that feedback, participation and team support significantly influence role clarity, which in turn influences job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The research suggests that boundary personnel in service firms should strive for more clarity in perceived role for delivering better service quality. The limitations are in sample availability from in‐house transaction call centres of a single bank.

Originality/value

The contributions of this study are untangling the confusing research evidence on the effect of role clarity on service quality, using service quality as a performance variable as opposed to productivity estimates, adopting an internal marketing approach to understanding the phenomenon, and introducing teamwork along with job‐design and supervisory factors as antecedent to role clarity.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Nicholas J. Ashill, Janet Carruthers and Jayne Krisjanous

This paper proposes investigating a model of service recovery performance in a public health‐care setting.

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4730

Abstract

Purpose

This paper proposes investigating a model of service recovery performance in a public health‐care setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Frontline hospital staff (administrative and nursing staff) representing a range of out‐patient departments/clinics in a New Zealand inner‐city public hospital completed a self‐administered questionnaire on organizational variables affecting their service recovery efforts, job satisfaction and intention to resign. Data obtained from the hospital were analyzed using the SEM‐based partial least squares (PLS) methodology.

Findings

The results show significant relationships between perceived managerial attitudes, work environment perceptions, service recovery performance and outcomes variables.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study are noted including the generalizability of the findings within a public health‐care environment. Suggestions for future research include an examination of other variables potentially important in service recovery efforts. A patient perspective would also be valuable.

Practical implications

The research advances understanding of frontline service recovery performance in a health‐care setting and the findings indicate that health‐care managers can take actions on a number of fronts to assist progress toward the achievement of frontline service recovery excellence.

Originality/value

Very little attention has been given to understanding the antecedents and outcomes of service recovery performance in the health‐care literature. By expanding earlier research in private sector industries, the study investigates a model of service recovery performance in a public health‐care setting.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Arne De Keyser, Sarah Köcher, Linda Alkire (née Nasr), Cédric Verbeeck and Jay Kandampully

Smart technologies and connected objects are rapidly changing the organizational frontline. Yet, our understanding of how these technologies infuse service encounters…

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6439

Abstract

Purpose

Smart technologies and connected objects are rapidly changing the organizational frontline. Yet, our understanding of how these technologies infuse service encounters remains limited. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to update existing classifications of Frontline Service Technology (FST) infusion. Moreover, the authors discuss three promising smart and connected technologies – conversational agents, extended reality (XR) and blockchain technology – and their respective implications for customers, frontline employees and service organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a conceptual approach integrating existing work on FST infusion with artificial intelligence, robotics, XR and blockchain literature, while also building on insights gathered through expert interviews and focus group conversations with members of two service research centers.

Findings

The authors define FST and propose a set of FST infusion archetypes at the organizational frontline. Additionally, the authors develop future research directions focused on understanding how conversational agents, XR and blockchain technology will impact service.

Originality/value

This paper updates and extends existing classifications of FST, while paving the road for further work on FST infusion.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Sun-Young Park and Stuart E. Levy

The aim of this paper is to examine hotel frontline employees' perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities at the hotel they currently work, and how…

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5278

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine hotel frontline employees' perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities at the hotel they currently work, and how their perceptions influence their level of organizational identification, an indicator of their relationship quality with the hotel.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses 575 responses of hotel frontline employees in the US, collected through a national online survey.

Findings

Results show that hotel employees' perceptions of CSR activities encompass the host community, colleagues, and customers, beyond green practices. Moreover, their perceptions of CSR activities positively and significantly influence the level of organizational identification.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this exploratory study should not be generalized to all frontline employees in the US hotel industry. Future studies should extend this study to examine potential relationships among other variables relevant to organizational identification, and in other hospitality industry contexts. Also, this study does not seek to question the merits of CSR per se, as it takes a managerial perspective to assist hoteliers' understanding of and decision-making on CSR.

Practical implications

As CSR activities often represent company values and norms, frontline employees' perceptions of them can influence how they identify with the company, which is an impetus for their attitudinal and behavioral support to help achieve the company's goals. Accordingly, CSR activities can be a critical tool in engaging frontline employees to achieve better performance and derive more meaning in their careers, and in attracting good quality employees.

Originality/value

This study is a first attempt to empirically examine how CSR activities can benefit hotel employees, based on various literatures on service-profit-chain, CSR, and social identity theory.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Khaled Aladwan, Ramudu Bhanugopan and Alan Fish

The purpose of this paper is designed to test a conceptual model founded on the theoretical background generated above, and to evaluate the latent factor structure of…

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1500

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is designed to test a conceptual model founded on the theoretical background generated above, and to evaluate the latent factor structure of organisational commitment among frontline employees in Jordanian organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Principal component analysis has been used to determine the underlying factor structures for exploratory factor analysis. A test of the model uses a path analytic approach with LISREL 8.80 for confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that the data relationships are consistent with the causal model of organisational commitment and contribute to understanding the attitude of the employees. Also, the current results emphasize the need for a practical approach in examining organisational commitment level as employers can control the individuals' perceptions in accordance with the business settings.

Practical implications

This paper contributes to theory with respect to organisational commitment and employee attitudes. The findings encourage Jordanian organisations to focus more on employee perceptions and commitment, by providing a better understanding of the motivational factors at work.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the knowledge in several grounds. First, it validates the structure of organisational commitment in a non-Western context. Second, it contributes to the knowledge of the topic of commitment in Jordan.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2017

Sizwe Timothy Phakathi

This concluding chapter not only summarises the key discussions and arguments of the preceding chapters but also reflects on organisational, managerial, supervisory…

Abstract

This concluding chapter not only summarises the key discussions and arguments of the preceding chapters but also reflects on organisational, managerial, supervisory, behavioural, social and cultural factors shaping the miners’ reactions to the restructured and formalised deep-level mining work processes and their unofficial job tactic of making a plan (planisa). The chapter provides suggestions on how the positive aspects of planisa could be harnessed and negative aspects addressed towards efficient, productive and safer organisational, managerial, supervisory and operational practices at the rock-face down the mine.

Details

Production, Safety and Teamwork in a Deep-Level Mining Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-564-1

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Thim Prætorius and Peter Hasle

The purpose of this paper is to investigate frontline meetings in hospitals and how they are used for coordination of daily operations across organizational and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate frontline meetings in hospitals and how they are used for coordination of daily operations across organizational and occupational boundaries.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth multiple-case study of four purposefully selected departments from four different hospitals is conducted. The selected cases had actively developed and embedded scheduled meetings as structural means to achieve coordination of daily operations.

Findings

Health care professionals and managers, next to their traditional mono-professional meetings (e.g. doctors or nurses), develop additional operational, daily meetings such as work-shift meetings, huddles and hand-off meetings to solve concrete care tasks. These new types of meetings are typically short, task focussed, led by a chair and often inter-disciplinary. The meetings secure a personal proximity which the increased dependency on hospital-wide IT solutions cannot. During meetings, objects and representations (e.g. monitors, whiteboards or paper cards) create a needed gathering point to span across boundaries. As regards embedding meetings, local engagement helps contextualizing meetings and solving concrete care tasks, thereby making health care professionals more likely to value these daily meeting spaces.

Practical implications

Health care professionals and managers can use formal meeting spaces aided by objects and representations to support solving daily and interdependent health care tasks in ways that IT solutions in hospitals do not offer today. Implementation requires local engagement and contextualization.

Originality/value

This research paper shows the importance of daily, operational hospital meetings for frontline coordination. Organizational meetings are a prevalent collaborative activity, yet scarcely researched organizational phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Aditi Sarkar Sengupta, Ugur Yavas and Emin Babakus

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of person-job (P-J) fit on the impact of organizational resources (training and service technology), and a…

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1498

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of person-job (P-J) fit on the impact of organizational resources (training and service technology), and a personal resource (customer orientation) on frontline bank employees’ job performance and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale survey of 530 frontline employees of a national bank in New Zealand serves as the study setting.

Findings

Among others, results show that P-J fit fully mediates the impact of training on turnover intentions and job performance.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the study does not allow causal inferences. Therefore, future studies should adopt longitudinal designs.

Practical implications

Management should be careful in planning and providing organizational resources to frontline employees to enhance their perception of P-J fit. Also investing in the recruitment and selection of customer-oriented frontline employees would be a prudent course of action.

Originality/value

Empirical research in the banking services literature pertaining to the mediating role of P-J fit is scarce. There is also a lack of research regarding the interaction between personal and organizational resources resulting in complementary or supplementary effects on frontline employees’ fit perceptions. This study fills in the void in both areas.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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