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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2022

Francis Kasekende, Sentrine Nasiima and Rodgers Byamukama

The authors proposed that Organizational Compassion and Person-Organization-Fit dimensions interactively predict Discretionary Behaviours among employees in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors proposed that Organizational Compassion and Person-Organization-Fit dimensions interactively predict Discretionary Behaviours among employees in the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) sector in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ structural equation modelling to test hypotheses. The research was carried out in two studies; the second one was done six months after the first study. Two samples of respondents were drawn from NGOs operating in West Nile and Kampala regions, respectively.

Findings

Discretionary behaviours were significantly related to the cross-sectionally assessed predictors including organizational compassion and supplementary fit. Complementary fit did not significantly predict discretionary behaviours. Both supplementary fit and complementary fit moderated the association between organizational compassion and employee discretionary behaviours among both rural and urban setting placed NGOs.

Practical implications

In order to boost employee exhibition of discretionary behaviours, leaders of NGOs should always endeavour to find viable organizational compassion-supplementary fit and organizational compassion-complementary fit blend that can add value to NGOs in Uganda.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that have focused on testing the interaction effects of organizational compassion and person organization fit dimensions on discretionary behaviours. These results highlight both supplementary fit and complementary fit as key individual resources that promote the effects of organization compassion on discretionary behaviours among NGO workers in Uganda.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Gary N. Burns, Levi R. G. Nieminen, Lindsey Kotrba and Daniel Denison

On a global scale, leadership takes place within a complex environment that is molded both by national culture and organizational culture influences. This chapter explores…

Abstract

On a global scale, leadership takes place within a complex environment that is molded both by national culture and organizational culture influences. This chapter explores leader-culture (L-C) fit in this global context. Drawing together distinct perspectives on national culture and organizational culture, we identify potential contingencies of L-C fit across these levels. In addition to identifying key gaps and areas for future exploration, we also discuss the practical uses of fit when selecting and developing leaders. Overall, we argue that researchers and practitioners could benefit from an expanded perspective on cultural fit to simultaneously address aspects of national and organizational culture.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Rachael Rief and Samantha Clinkinbeard

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between officer perceptions of fit in their organization and stress (organizational and operational), overall job…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between officer perceptions of fit in their organization and stress (organizational and operational), overall job satisfaction and turnover contemplation (within the last 6 months).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used cross-sectional survey data from a sample of 832 officers from two Midwest police departments to examine the relationships between fit, stress and work-related attitudes.

Findings

Perceived stress and organizational fit were strong predictors of overall job satisfaction and turnover contemplation; organizational fit accounted for the most variation in stress, satisfaction and turnover contemplation. Organizational stress partially mediated the relationship between organizational fit and job satisfaction and organizational fit and turnover contemplation.

Research Implications

More research is needed to identify predictors of organizational fit perceptions among police officers.

Practical implications

Findings indicate that agencies should pay close attention to the organizational culture and structure when trying to address issues of officer well-being and retention. Further, the person−environment framework can be a useful tool in examining police occupational outcomes.

Originality/value

The authors findings contribute to research on officer stress by exploring perceptions of organizational fit as a predictor of stress and unpacking how officer stress matters to important work outcomes, including job satisfaction and thoughts of turnover, by considering stress as a mediator between organizational fit and these work outcomes.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Nwamaka A. Anaza

The purpose of this paper is to examine a model of employee-customer identification (ECID) using two samples: nurses and cooperative extension frontline employees. The…

1291

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a model of employee-customer identification (ECID) using two samples: nurses and cooperative extension frontline employees. The model posits that person-organization fit, person-job fit, and organizational identification are positively related to ECID.

Design/methodology/approach

A recursive path-based structural model was employed to test seven hypotheses regarding the relationships between the two fit constructs, organizational identification, and ECID.

Findings

In both samples, person-organization fit and person-job fit were positively related to organizational identification, and organizational identification was positively related to ECID. In the cooperative extension sample, person-job fit was positively related to ECID. Person-job fit was also indirectly related to ECID through organizational identification in both samples.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply an important relationship between person-job fit and ECID that could be useful for improving service encounters between employees and customers. In addition, an emphasis on organizational identification may also contribute to improved employee-customer relationships.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the first attempts to demonstrate a link between person-job and person-organization fit on ECID. The results of this study provide support for organizational identification and person-job fit as important factors in employee-customer relationships.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Fatma Nur Iplik, Kemal Can Kilic and Azmi Yalcin

The purpose of this research is to examine the simultaneous effects of person‐organization (P‐O) and person‐job (P‐J) fit on job attitudes of five star hotels' managers in Turkey.

3891

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the simultaneous effects of person‐organization (P‐O) and person‐job (P‐J) fit on job attitudes of five star hotels' managers in Turkey.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from managers of five star hotels via a web‐based questionnaire. According to the data of Ministry of Culture and Tourism, Turkey has 299 ministry licensed five star hotels. Of the 299 hotel managers, 158 (52.8 percent) have participated in the research. Correlation and regression analyses were used to test the predicted relationships.

Findings

The findings in this paper indicate that P‐O/P‐J fit positively related to organizational commitment, job motivation and job satisfaction, and according to correlation analyses results, negatively related to organizational stress level of hotel managers.

Research limitations/implications

The findings contribute to an improved understanding of the influence of P‐O and P‐J fit on job attitudes of hotel managers. Results may not generalize to other cultural or national contexts.

Originality/value

Most past research has assessed only one type of fit, without controlling for the other. This paper has contributed to the literature by investigating the combined effects of P‐O and P‐J fit on organizational commitment, job motivation, job satisfaction, and organizational stress of managers in a five star hotel context. Managerial and theoretical implications of research findings are also discussed. This paper contributes to the literature by being one of the first to examine the effects of two different types of person‐environment fit on job attitudes of Turkish hotels' managers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Ann Marie Ryan and Mark J. Schmit

Person—environment (P—E) fit has long been a focus in organizational research. A climate‐based measure of P—E Fit was developed for use in organizational and individual…

Abstract

Person—environment (P—E) fit has long been a focus in organizational research. A climate‐based measure of P—E Fit was developed for use in organizational and individual assessment. A series of studies with a Q‐sort measure of climate and fit (the Organizational Fit Instrument—OFI) indicated ways in which P—E fit information can be used in organizational development. In addition, the psychometric properties of the OFI assessed in these studies suggested that, despite the ipsative nature of the measure, it may provide the organizational development practitioner or researcher with a sound and useful tool. Suggestions for future research are proposed.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Kerstin A. Aumann and Cheri Ostroff

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular…

Abstract

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular attention being paid to the appropriateness of various human resources management (HRM) practices because practices that may be effective within one cultural context may not be effective in other cultural contexts. This chapter argues that a multi-level perspective is needed to explain the interplay between HRM practices and employee responses across cultural contexts. Specifically, the multi-level framework developed in this chapter elucidates the importance of fit between HRM practices, individual values, organizational values, and societal values. Societal values play a key role in the adoption of HRM practices, and the effectiveness of these HRM practices will depend largely on “fit” or alignment with the values of the societal culture in which the organization is operating. HRM practices also shape the collective responses of employees through organizational climate at the organizational level and through psychological climate at the individual level. For positive employee attitudes and responses to emerge, the climate created by the HRM practices must be aligned with societal and individual values. Building on these notions, the strength of the societal culture in which the organization is operating serves as a mechanism that links relationships between climate, value fit, and attitudes across levels of analysis. The chapter concludes with some recommendations for future research and implications for practice.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Jui-Chieh Huang

This study applies a person-environment fit (PEF) framework to examine the extent to which organizational attractiveness may be influenced by person-organization fit (POF…

Abstract

Purpose

This study applies a person-environment fit (PEF) framework to examine the extent to which organizational attractiveness may be influenced by person-organization fit (POF) feedback and person-job fit (PJF) feedback in web-based recruitment. Furthermore, the potential mediating roles of subjective POF and subjective PJF perceptions were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Senior undergraduate business administration students participated in a two-stage experiment by completing a paper-and-pencil survey during a campus career fair and then reviewing a recruitment website.

Findings

Research findings showed that online assessment feedback on PJF was positively related to organizational attractiveness. The higher the level PJF, the more organizational attractiveness participants reported. Second, both POF and PJF feedback information can affect organizational attractiveness indirectly through subjective POF and PJF perceptions, respectively. Fresh graduates were more sensitive to PJF feedback in deciding organizational attractiveness.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the recruitment literature in at least three ways. First, online recruitment messages concerning can affect organizational attractiveness. Second, in support of the PEF framework, fresh graduates can distinguish subjective POF perceptions from subjective PJF perceptions. Third, fresh graduates are more sensitive to PJF information and perceptions in deciding organizational attractiveness.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2007

Vicente Roca‐Puig and Juan Carlos Bou‐Llusar

Miles and Snow’s (1978) model posits that organizational performance is dependent upon the degree of consistency (fit) that managers establish between organizational and…

Abstract

Miles and Snow’s (1978) model posits that organizational performance is dependent upon the degree of consistency (fit) that managers establish between organizational and environmental elements. However, different interpretations of the concept of fit coexist in the literature. We argue that in this model, consistency can be defined as a pattern of “equivalent covariance”, which is operatively created through the use of confirmatory factor analysis. The form of fit as covariance leads to the view of “configuration as quality”, in that the basic subject is the study of the interrelationships among organizational and environmental elements. The concept of fit as covariance is decidedly different from the traditional concept of fit as difference, which regards configuration as a typology or taxonomy. The covariance perspective of configurational theory is underused; for this reason, we apply this analytical perspective to a sample of 229 companies. The empirical results confirm that consistency positively influences organizational performance.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

Walter C Borman, Jerry W Hedge, Kerri L Ferstl, Jennifer D Kaufman, William L Farmer and Ronald M Bearden

This chapter provides a contemporary view of state-of-the science research and thinking done in the areas of selection and classification. It takes as a starting point the…

Abstract

This chapter provides a contemporary view of state-of-the science research and thinking done in the areas of selection and classification. It takes as a starting point the observation that the world of work is undergoing important changes that are likely to result in different occupational and organizational structures. In this context, we review recent research on criteria, especially models of job performance, followed by sections on predictors, including ability, personality, vocational interests, biodata, and situational judgment tests. The paper also discusses person-organization fit models, as alternatives or complements to the traditional person-job fit paradigm.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-174-3

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