Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Jin Hong, Bojun Hou, Kejia Zhu and Dora Marinova

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between exploratory/exploitative innovation and employee creativity in the Chinese context and how these two…

1439

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between exploratory/exploitative innovation and employee creativity in the Chinese context and how these two relationships can be moderated by an important cultural dimension – collectivism.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework was developed to explore the relationships between exploratory/exploitative innovation, employee creativity and collectivism. Data were collected by sending out surveys to managers and employees in various industries in mainland China. Hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regressions.

Findings

The results show that both exploratory innovation and exploitative innovation are positively related to employee creativity. Furthermore, collectivism negatively moderates the effects of both types of innovation on employee creativity, despite its positive main effect.

Originality/value

This study explores the relationship between organizational innovation and individual employee creativity in the Chinese context. This paper empirically analyzes the moderating effect of collectivism in the relationship between organizational innovation and employee creativity. It also indicates the factors inherent in Chinese culture that influence innovation and gives explanations from education, subordinate relation, etc.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Rebecca Abraham

Presents a study which derives relationships between the personality/cultural variables of vertical and horizontal individualism and collectivism, on the one hand, and the…

6533

Abstract

Presents a study which derives relationships between the personality/cultural variables of vertical and horizontal individualism and collectivism, on the one hand, and the organizational criteria of intrapreneurship and organizational commitment on the other. Suggests that horizontal individualism may explain intrapreneurship jointly with a supportive organizational climate. Vertical collectivism demonstrates a direct positive relationship with organizational commitment. Horizontal collectivism varies jointly with work‐group and supervisor commitments in a negative relationship with organizational commitment, indicating a perception of conflict between work‐group and supervisor goals on the one hand and organizational goals on the other. Concludes that, while the basis of the vertical collectivist’s commitment seems unclear, horizontal collectivists base their commitment on compliance or rewards. Discusses theoretical and a few practical implications.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Maaja Vadi and Michael Vereshagin

The aim of this paper is explore how organizational culture is influenced by collectivism in Russia and draw some recommendations from human resources perspective because…

2214

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is explore how organizational culture is influenced by collectivism in Russia and draw some recommendations from human resources perspective because Russia differs from most Western countries in several ways, one of the key ones being a much higher tendency to collectivism.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey questionnaires were used in order to discover interrelations between characteristically collectivism and organizational culture. Organizational culture was turned into the task and relationship orientations approach and three levels of collectivism were distinguished. A total of 586 employees working for various organizations in Russia participated in this study.

Findings

First, it was discovered that Russians hold collectivistic attitudes (familism and patriotism) showing correlation with both orientations (task and relationships) of organizational culture. The results show that familism is negatively correlated with task orientation, while Patriotism is positively correlated with task and relationship orientations. These findings make it possible to develop recommendations for human resources management (HRM).

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the study are related to organizational culture approach and the Russians' multifaceted ethnic and cultural background. Nevertheless, this study illuminates various issues that may influence HRM practices in Russia.

Practical implications

The Russian organizations have some specific characteristics and this paper explains how those might be better managed. Special attention is paid on the HRM strategy and policy in the Russian context.

Originality/value

The main value of the paper is related to the contribution to the understanding which cultural factors may influence the HRM practices in Russia.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2022

Xifang Ma, Zhengyun Rui and Genyuan Zhong

This study aims to provide a better understanding into how large-scale companies overcome their rigidity and bureaucracy, and transform entrepreneurial orientation (EO…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a better understanding into how large-scale companies overcome their rigidity and bureaucracy, and transform entrepreneurial orientation (EO) into organizational responsiveness (e.g. interdepartmental collaboration [IDC]). It also clarifies the double-edged role of organizational culture in shaping IDC, specifically within the Chinese economy that is deeply influenced by Confucianism.

Design/methodology/approach

Datas were randomly collected from companies that reside in the Yangtze River Delta region. With a sample of 115 large-scale EO Chinese firms, consisting of 402 department managers and 115 executives. The study aggregates the scores to create an overall measurement for EO, collectivism, power distance and IDC in the analysis. Further, confirmatory factor analyses were used to measure the structural model fitness, and multiple regression analysis was used to assess the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that in competitive environments, IDC, as a strategic response to EO and a risk aversion of inertia and bureaucracy, fully mediates the positive relationship between EO and organizational creativity. Furthermore, the positive association is more pronounced under high cultural collectivism or low power distance in large-scale firms.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to the understanding of EO approach at the organizational level. The results posit that when large companies adopt EO, they are proactive rather than passive and would exhibit IDC as an important strategic responsiveness. Moreover, different organizational cultural orientations (i.e. high collectivism and low power distance) help to build IDC before cultivating innovation.

Practical implications

The results in this study suggest that large companies should focus on developing IDC to overcome knowledge fragmentation, bureaucracy and inertia. Also, large firms should develop Human Resource Management practices, such as creating job rotation and workflow, as well as cultural trust and common beliefs. In contrast, they should be on guard against status differences and workplace hierarchy’s cultural context.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that considers the roles of IDC and organizational culture and examines how large-scale entrepreneurial-oriented companies breed innovation.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Frank Wiengarten, Cristina Gimenez, Brian Fynes and Kasra Ferdows

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of cultural collectivism on the efficacy of lean practices. Furthermore, this study assesses whether or not potential…

3733

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of cultural collectivism on the efficacy of lean practices. Furthermore, this study assesses whether or not potential cultural disadvantages related to the level of individualism at the national level can be compensated for at the organisational culture level.

Design/methodology/approach

Hofstede’s cultural dimension of individualism is used to test whether practicing a collectivistic culture at the organisational level can fully compensate for the potential disadvantages of being geographically situated in an individualistic culture when practicing lean manufacturing.

Findings

Results suggest that cultural collectivism at the national and organisational level have a significant impact on the efficacy of lean practices. Furthermore, the negative impact of being situated in an individualistic country cannot be fully compensated for through practicing a collectivistic organisational culture when practicing lean.

Originality/value

This study represents a comprehensive attempt to simultaneously assess the collectivism cultural components of lean practices at the national as well as at the organisational level.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Kanimozhi Narayanan and Chanki Moon

Antecedents and outcomes of workplace deviance have been studied over the past few decades but there is still a lack of research from an organizational climate, witness…

Abstract

Purpose

Antecedents and outcomes of workplace deviance have been studied over the past few decades but there is still a lack of research from an organizational climate, witness and cultural point of view. Theoretical considerations for the present research are based on the social cognitive theory perspective where the authors expect employees's involvement in workplace destructive deviance would depend on their organizational climate perception, witness behavior and cultural orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 987 participants from India (N = 404) and USA (N = 583) completed an online questionnaire, and multi-group structural equation modeling analysis was conducted to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

Across cultural groups, higher collectivism is associated with lower engagement in workplace deviance. Furthermore, employees' higher intervening witness behavior is associated with lower destructive deviant behaviors when employees showed higher endorsement of collectivism in India (not USA). However, employees' higher self-serving witness behavior is associated with higher destructive deviant behaviors. Interestingly, employees with higher endorsement of individualism associated with organizational climate are more likely to engage in destructive deviance.

Originality/value

The main originality of this study is to further increase the understanding of the relationship between organizational climate, witness behavior (self-serving and intervening behavior) and workplace deviance (organizational and interpersonal destructive deviance) considering the role of employees' cultural orientation (individualism vs collectivism).

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2017

Nancy Chen, Mike Chen-ho Chao, Henry Xie and Dean Tjosvold

Scholarly research provides few insights into how integrating the western values of individualism and low power distance with the eastern values of collectivism and high…

2938

Abstract

Purpose

Scholarly research provides few insights into how integrating the western values of individualism and low power distance with the eastern values of collectivism and high power distance may influence cross-cultural conflict management. Following the framework of the theory of cooperation and competition, the purpose of this paper is to directly examine the impacts of organization-level collectivism and individualism, as well as high and low power distance, to determine the interactive effects of these four factors on cross-cultural conflict management.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a 2×2 experiment study. Data were collected from a US laboratory experiment with 80 participants.

Findings

American managers working in a company embracing western low power distance and eastern collectivism values were able to manage conflict cooperatively with their Chinese workers. Moreover, American managers working in a company valuing collectivism developed more trust with Chinese workers, and those in a company culture with high power distance were more interested in their workers’ viewpoints and more able to reach integrated solutions.

Originality/value

This study is an interdisciplinary research applying the social psychology field’s theory of cooperation and competition to the research on employee-manager, cross-cultural conflict management (which are industrial relations and organizational behavior topics, respectively), with an eye to the role of cultural adaptation. Furthermore, this study included an experiment to directly investigate the interactions between American managers and Chinese workers discussing work distribution conflict in four different organizational cultures.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2018

Teresa Harrison and Dianna L. Stone

The purpose of this paper is to examine the degree to which job seekers’ cultural values moderate the relations between organizational values displayed on an e-recruiting…

2450

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the degree to which job seekers’ cultural values moderate the relations between organizational values displayed on an e-recruiting websites and organizational attraction by adapting a Cultural Vales Model of Recruitment. The authors also assessed the moderating relation of collectivism on the relation between an opportunity to contact an employee in the organization and attraction.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a 2 × 2 design and data from 235 students who were seeking jobs.

Findings

Individualism moderated the relation between website achievement values and organizational attraction. Individuals’ collectivism values moderated the relation between the opportunity to contact an employee and attraction.

Practical implications

Organizations that display achievement values on websites may attract individuals with highly value individualism. This may inadvertently limit diversity. Findings also suggest that providing an opportunity to contact an employee is likely to attract individuals with high rather than low levels of collectivism.

Social implications

Content displayed on e-recruiting websites may inadvertently limit diversity in organizations.

Originality/value

This was the first study to examine the effects of the congruence of individual cultural values with organizational values, and the opportunity to contact an employee on attraction in an e-recruiting context.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Catherine T. Kwantes

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the roles of culture and job satisfaction as antecedents to organizational commitment in both a Western context (the…

3256

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the roles of culture and job satisfaction as antecedents to organizational commitment in both a Western context (the US) and in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses come from a questionnaire distributed to engineers in India. Construct equivalence of measures is established, while hierarchical regression analysis is used to assess the extent to which each hypothesized antecedent is related to affective, continuance, and normative commitment. Responses from each national context are compared and contrasted.

Findings

Job satisfaction is found to relate to affective commitment in both the Indian and American samples. Moderate support is found for the hypothesized effect of collectivism on normative commitment in both samples, while the hypothesized antecedents to continuance commitment are not found in any sample. Different patterns of relationships emerge in the US and India.

Research limitations/implications

The results provide further cautionary evidence against uncritically applying organizational theories developed in a Western context to developing nations such as India. The sample in this research is restricted to engineers, future research should examine other occupations/professions as well as determining the applicability of these results to different levels in the organization.

Originality/value

This research examines theoretically suggested antecedents to organizational commitment, explicitly testing these relationships in two cultural contexts. The results presented in this paper suggest that context must be taken into account when developing organizational theories. Further, the results suggest specific activities that can be useful in the Indian context to increase both normative and affective commitment.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

H. Alvin Ng

Adventure learning (AL) programs have strong support in the West but are only emerging in Asia. This study shows a cultural dimension – collectivism (specifically, a…

2045

Abstract

Adventure learning (AL) programs have strong support in the West but are only emerging in Asia. This study shows a cultural dimension – collectivism (specifically, a preference to work in groups) was negatively related to changes in two key teamwork attitudes – task‐participation and social‐support among a group of Asian AL participants. Despite this, absolute mean differences between post‐test and pre‐test scores were positive across the sample. Changes in the two teamwork attitudes predicted similar changes in team‐spirit, which in turn led to changes in organizational‐identification. Results also indicated that too much focus on member maintenance needs could detract from this identification. Overall, AL was shown to have a positive impact on the Asian participants.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000