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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Chin Wei Chong, Yee Yen Yuen and Booi Chen Tan

The purpose of this paper is to identify the antecedents of successful organizational cross-border knowledge transfer and also the relationship among the antecedents for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the antecedents of successful organizational cross-border knowledge transfer and also the relationship among the antecedents for sustainable competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a focus group study was conducted to identify major constructs and map out the proposed framework. This is then followed by questionnaire survey from 210 Malaysian multimedia super corridor (MSC) status corporations as recipients. Their international business affiliates refer to any organizations located outside Malaysia with which the recipient firm has a relationship. Data were analysed using SPSS.

Findings

The findings suggest that the perceived value of the knowledge, relational dimension and cognitive dimension, as well as recipient learning intent and the attractiveness of a foreign source are significant related to the effectiveness of organizational cross-border knowledge transfer.

Research limitations/implications

Because this research only covered 210 MSC status corporations, future research can try to have more coverage on other industry to have larger sample size for generalizability purposes. Other factors such as organizational and context characteristics can be added as antecedents to strengthen the framework for effective knowledge transfer.

Practical implications

The empirical findings can be used as a guideline for MSC status firms to undergo a self-check and help them rethink and reposition themselves in light of the findings. It helps MSC status corporations to frame their organizational cross-border knowledge transfer activities to enable the creation and application of knowledge which should allow them to drive the capability of creating and retaining a greater value onto their core business competencies.

Originality/value

This study provides valuable insights to help creating a successful foundation for organizational cross-border knowledge transfer. This study is also among few studies to examine the critical antecedents in successful organizational cross-border knowledge transfer from a multidimensional perspective in Malaysia.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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56916

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Yuliya Snihur

This paper aims to examine Borders response to business model innovation (BMI) by Amazon in the bookselling industry. The case illuminates potential causes for protracted…

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1473

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine Borders response to business model innovation (BMI) by Amazon in the bookselling industry. The case illuminates potential causes for protracted periods of organizational unlearning, explaining why organizational unlearning, although beneficial in many documented cases, can also be insufficient to prevent failure.

Design/methodology/approach

Archival data are used to study Borders’s historical evolution from 1995 to its 2011 bankruptcy. Theoretical inferences are drawn from this case to shed light on the process of organizational unlearning.

Findings

Borders failed because its top managers were unable to adjust its traditionalist superstore identity to respond in an adequate manner to the changes in their environment. Instead, the company went through protracted phases of weathering the storm, denial and unlearning, resulting in bankruptcy. This extreme case of failure explains why sometimes, organizational unlearning might be insufficient, resulting in organizational demise rather than renewal.

Research limitations/implications

A longitudinal study of an extreme case allows the author to build links between the research on organizational unlearning and the scholarship on organizational identity.

Practical implications

Organizations may survive longer if their top managers engage in the process of organizational identity change in response to BMI in their industry. The article proposes a few actions that organizations might usefully take to react to BMI before it is too late.

Social implications

Better understanding of failure may enable preventive behavior.

Originality/value

This article explains how organizational identity prevents learning the right things and augments the dangers organizations face during unlearning.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Yu Li, K.S. Redding and En Xie

Given that several publicly announced international merger and acquisition deals have been abandoned in recent years, the purpose of this paper is to present a synthesis…

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1393

Abstract

Purpose

Given that several publicly announced international merger and acquisition deals have been abandoned in recent years, the purpose of this paper is to present a synthesis of influential articles that examine organizational characteristics of cross-border acquisition transactions. The synthesis is framed through general traits and resources, learning and prior acquisition experience, and top-level management and governance attributes. Specifically, the paper conceptualizes key organizational attributes influencing the propensity of cross-border negotiations, and the most common characteristics and post-deal effects by illustrating several case examples from around the world.

Design/methodology/approach

Owing to fairness and integrity principles of the literature survey studies, the paper adopts an exploratory review design to present a synthesis of several influential articles published in strategy, international business and corporate finance journals. Since case method and storytelling are the best qualitative approaches to conceptualizing extant theoretical contributions, a number of case examples—successful, delayed and abandoned—from around the world have been discussed by leveraging the case information from archival sources.

Findings

Drawing on resource-based view, organizational learning, upper echelons and agency theory perspectives, the paper underscores three observations. First, organizational characteristics such as firm age, firm size, ownership structure, slack resources, marketing resources, technological intensity, export intensity and business group affiliation have different impacts on the propensity of publicly announced cross-border deals. Second, firm’s prior acquisition experience and firm’s acquisition experience in the target country have positive or moderating effects on the success of a cross-border merger. Third, top-level management characteristics such as CEO foreign nationality and CEO international career experience, and governance characteristics such as board size, the number of independent directors and directors with overseas experience, have mixed effects on the incidence of cross-border acquisitions.

Practical implications

The paper puts forth several recommendations for top-level managers participating in cross-border acquisition negotiations, such as learning from peers in the same industry, learning from predecessors in the target country and learning from failure negotiations in the same industry and other industries.

Originality/value

Nested within the organizational, international business strategy and corporate finance literature, the paper presents a synthesis of influential publications that study organizational characteristics affecting the propensity of cross-border acquisitions. The cases discussed in this paper are unique examples from around the world.

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Eleonora Karassvidou and Niki Glaveli

The purpose of this paper is to seek to provide support and extend work-family Border Theory (BT) in order to investigate organizational and individual factors that…

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1549

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek to provide support and extend work-family Border Theory (BT) in order to investigate organizational and individual factors that determine the complex nature of work-family balance (WFB).

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was conducted in a company in Greece. In total, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted. Data analysis was guided by interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

The key findings illustrate that strong borders protect the investigated, powerful, work domain and expand only to accommodate its’ needs. In congruence with BT, employees choose to be central participants in the powerful, highly impermeable and inflexibly bordered, work domain. The deeply entrenched organizational culture, as well as leaders’ behavior and leadership style, support the development of an array of positive work attitudes which boost central participation in the work domain. Due to the strongly bordered work setting, employees were found to choose segmentation as a WFB cope strategy; however, shifts in the participants’ life phase, as well as unfulfilled expectations, lead them to reset priorities and reevaluate their central participation in the dominant work domain.

Practical implications

The present study has implications for HR practitioners. Communication and open discussions on work-family themes reveal issues that can positively contribute to WFB. Further to this, organizations need to consider individual differences when they deal with WFB issues and frame interventions to facilitate this process.

Originality/value

This paper adds to current thinking in BT by illustrating that organizational culture, leadership and work attitudes have a strong impact on the nature of the work domain and its borders, as well as on employees’ central participation in the work setting and the attained WFB.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Amar Gupta

While the evolving high bandwidth information highways provide the infrastructure for attaining “physical connectivity” across computing resources and information systems…

Abstract

While the evolving high bandwidth information highways provide the infrastructure for attaining “physical connectivity” across computing resources and information systems, the “on/off” ramps to such highways are still at a primitive stage. Huge manual effort is currently expended to develop knowledge‐based paradigms that can effectively transcend national borders as well as other types of borders. This paper examines the prevailing situation from four perspectives: knowledge acquisition; knowledge discovery; knowledge management; and knowledge dissemination. Unlike current approaches that tend to focus on one aspect only, an integrated approach that attaches appropriate weightage to each of the four facets is emphasized in this paper.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Marianne Döös and Lena Wilhelmson

The paper seeks to argue for a theoretical contribution that deals with the detection of collective learning. The aim is to examine and clarify the genesis processes of…

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1646

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to argue for a theoretical contribution that deals with the detection of collective learning. The aim is to examine and clarify the genesis processes of collective learning. The empirical basis is a telecoms context with task‐driven networking across both internal and external organisational borders.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws upon an integration of organisational learning theory and a relational and contextual branch of experiential learning theory framed as organisational pedagogy. A case study of R&D work serves as the empirical foundation. Four teams were studied through interviews, focus groups, and observations. Data were analysed in interplay between empirical findings and theoretical concepts.

Findings

Collective learning does not only occur within the boundaries of well‐defined groups where previously identified. Characterised by distributed work processes and rapid changes in the telecom context, collective learning is associated with individual distribution of tasks, insufficiency as a foundation, a question‐and‐answer space, and the imprints of others in a shared action arena.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions concern how collective learning can be comprehended. The paper points to the importance of interaction and a shared action arena. The way in which knowledge develops is, to some extent, context‐dependent. This indicates that the characteristics of the shared action arena vary.

Practical implications

Differentiating learning processes has a practical significance for organisations wanting to focus upon competence issues.

Originality/value

This study identified the importance for collective learning of the presence of a shared action arena. The theoretical contribution fills a gap in the understanding of how collective learning arises when moving from face‐to‐face learning within local teams, to networking across both internal and external organisational borders. This contributes to the understanding of how the learning of individuals links with the learning of an organisation.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Valentina De Marchi, Eleonora Di Maria and Stefano Ponte

This paper aims at enriching the literature on international business (IB) studies to include insights from Global Value Chain (GVC) analysis to better explain how MNCs…

Abstract

This paper aims at enriching the literature on international business (IB) studies to include insights from Global Value Chain (GVC) analysis to better explain how MNCs can orchestrate a global network organization. A first important contribution of the GVC literature is that it shifts the focus from single firms to their value chains, providing instruments to study how activities are split and organized among different firms at the industry level, and how MNCs can implement different governing mechanisms within a network-based setting. The GVC literature also highlights that retailers (as global buyers) often act as ‘lead firms’ in shaping the trajectories of global industries, while IB studies have so far focused predominantly on manufacturing firms. A fine-grained analysis of alternative forms of governance characterizing value chains can offer additional elements in explaining how MNCs can manage their network relationships in a global scenario. Finally, through their focus on upgrading, GVC studies suggest that knowledge flows and innovation dynamics taking place within value chains are as important as those taking place within the MNC’s organizational border. We conclude by arguing that these insights can help the IB literature to examine the challenges and opportunities MNCs face in engaging with suppliers and to explain the dynamic evolution of orchestrating global activities at the global level.

Details

Orchestration of the Global Network Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-953-9

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Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2011

Tommy Tsung Ying Shih

Researchers continue to seek understanding of industrialization as a state managed process. How to create and implement new industries based on advanced knowledge is on…

Abstract

Researchers continue to seek understanding of industrialization as a state managed process. How to create and implement new industries based on advanced knowledge is on the policy agenda of many advanced nations. Measures that promote these developments include national capacity building in science and technology, the formation of technology transfer systems, and the establishment of industrial clusters. What these templates often overlook is an analysis of use. This chapter aims to increase the understanding of the processes that embed new solutions in structures from an industrial network perspective. The chapter describes an empirical study of high-technology industrialization in Taiwan that the researcher conducts to this end. The study shows that the Taiwanese industrial model is oversimplified and omits several important factors in the development of new industries. This study bases its findings on the notions that resource combination occurs in different time and space, the new always builds on existing resource structures, and the users are important as active participants in development processes.

Details

Interfirm Networks: Theory, Strategy, and Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-024-7

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Jacob D. Vakkayil

The article seeks to explore the various ways in which researchers have approached boundaries in relation to organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The article seeks to explore the various ways in which researchers have approached boundaries in relation to organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual in nature and explores prominent strands of research into boundaries within and at the periphery of the organization through a selective literature analysis.

Findings

The paper introduces new categories in the way boundaries are conceptualized and explores how researchers can introduce these in their studies.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review is selective and provides an indication of how further work could be directed.

Practical implications

The work could be of use to those exploring the dynamics of organizational boundaries.

Originality/value

A few convergence zones in the literature are identified and a new categorization indicating the dichotomies inherent in the study of organizational boundaries is introduced.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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