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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Donald G. Gardner and Jon L. Pierce

The purpose of this paper is to examine the questions “How does employees' focus of attention at work theoretically relate to organization‐based self‐esteem?”, and “Does…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the questions “How does employees' focus of attention at work theoretically relate to organization‐based self‐esteem?”, and “Does job focus and off‐job focus moderate relationships between organization‐based self‐esteem, and employee attitudes and perceptions of job complexity?”.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants in two different samples completed questionnaires containing measures of organization‐based self‐esteem, focus of attention at work, job complexity, and a variety of attitudes and behavioral intentions.

Findings

What and how much employees think about when they are at work changes relationships between organization‐based self‐esteem and employee perceptions of and attitudes towards their workplaces. Job focus and off‐job focus of attention intensified or weakened relationships with organization‐based self‐esteem.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions about causality are constrained by the cross‐sectional data collected in this study.

Practical implications

It appears that managers should attempt to draw employees' attention to self‐esteem bolstering aspects of their jobs; and away from debilitating ones.

Social implications

Societies benefit by having members with positive well‐being, to which organization‐based self‐esteem may contribute.

Originality/value

This is the first theoretical analysis and empirical study of relationships between organization‐based self‐esteem and employee focus of attention at work.

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Donald G. Gardner and Jon L. Pierce

This paper seeks to explore the relationships between organization‐based self‐esteem and narcissism, and their correlates. It aims to distinguish the two constructs, as…

5182

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the relationships between organization‐based self‐esteem and narcissism, and their correlates. It aims to distinguish the two constructs, as well as to examine the degree to which organization‐based self‐esteem is contaminated by “false self‐esteem” (namely, narcissism).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants completed questionnaires containing measures of organization‐based self‐esteem, narcissism, and a variety of motivational, attitudinal, and behavioral consequences. Co‐workers rated the participants' extra‐role and in‐role performance behaviors.

Findings

Organization‐based self‐esteem and narcissism appear to be quite distinct constructs. The organization‐based self‐esteem scale is unbiased by variance associated with narcissism. Organization‐based self‐esteem is associated with a variety of positive outcomes. In particular, organization‐based self‐esteem correlates negatively with hostility, while narcissism correlates positively with hostility.

Practical implications

The hypothesized negative attitudes and behaviors of narcissists were not found. However, organizations need to be cautious when delivering negative feedback to employees high in narcissism. Supervisors need to provide concrete evidence about deficiencies in narcissists' performance when providing feedback.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the relationships between organization‐based self‐esteem and narcissism in an organizational context.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Shilpee A. Dasgupta, Damodar Suar and Seema Singh

Through the lens of social exchange theory and organisation support theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the passive, aggressive, and assertive styles of…

24764

Abstract

Purpose

Through the lens of social exchange theory and organisation support theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the passive, aggressive, and assertive styles of managers/supervisors that influence perceived supervisory support and to test whether the support increases employees’ satisfaction with the communication of supervisors and their organisation‐based self‐esteem. It also assesses whether employees’ communication satisfaction and their self‐esteem influence employees’ performance, commitment and absenteeism.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 400 employees from ten manufacturing firms in India were studied through questionnaire survey. Standard instruments were used to assess the constructs. A scale was developed to measure the communication style of managers and a single item to assess absenteeism.

Findings

Results revealed that assertive style of communication lends maximum support to employees. Perceived supervisory support at the workplace enhances employees’ satisfaction with communication of supervisors and organisation‐based self‐esteem. Satisfaction with communication fosters a strong emotional bond with organisations and the emotional bond with organisations reduces employees’ absenteeism.

Originality/value

The paper shows that employees’ organisation‐based self‐esteem increases their job performance. Organisations can conduct training programs to develop an assertive communication style in their managers/supervisors to increase the support to subordinates; thereby its positive consequences will follow in increasing employees’ performance and commitment and reducing absenteeism.

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2022

Chien-Chih Kuo and Chih-Ying Wu

This study established and examined a moderated mediation model connecting workplace ostracism with job performance. Drawing from the viewpoint of self-esteem threat, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study established and examined a moderated mediation model connecting workplace ostracism with job performance. Drawing from the viewpoint of self-esteem threat, the model posits that the effect of workplace ostracism on job performance is mediated by levels of organization-based self-esteem, while the relationship between workplace ostracism and organization-based self-esteem is moderated by performance goal orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Multisource data were collected from 160 employees and their immediate supervisors in Taiwan.

Findings

As predicted in the research model, workplace ostracism was found to decrease organization-based self-esteem and, therefore, hinder employees' job performance. Performance goal orientation was found to buffer the negative effect of workplace ostracism on job performance via organization-based self-esteem.

Practical implications

To eliminate the negative impact of workplace ostracism, supervisors can help ostracized employees to self-regulate by aligning their performance goal orientation to reduce the perception of self-esteem threat.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence of boundary conditions for the relationship between workplace ostracism and job performance and explores the impact of self-regulation on ostracized employees' organization-based self-esteem and subsequent job performance.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Dirk De Clercq, Inam Ul Haq and Muhammad Umer Azeem

This study investigates the mediating role of improvisation behavior in the relationship between employees' perceptions of procedural justice and their job performance, as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the mediating role of improvisation behavior in the relationship between employees' perceptions of procedural justice and their job performance, as evaluated by their supervisors, as well as the invigorating role of their organization-based self-esteem in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected in three rounds among employees and their supervisors in Pakistan.

Findings

An important factor that connects procedural justice with enhanced job performance is whether employees react quickly to unexpected problems while carrying out their jobs. This mediating role of improvisation is particularly salient to the extent that employees consider themselves valuable organizational members.

Practical implications

For organizations, this study pinpoints a key mechanism—willingness to respond in the moment to unanticipated organizational failures—by which fair decision-making processes can steer employees toward performance-enhancing activities. It also reveals how this mechanism can be activated, namely, by ensuring that employees feel appreciated.

Originality/value

Improvisation represents an understudied but critical behavioral factor that links employees' beliefs about fair decision-making procedures to enhanced performance outcomes. This study shows, for the first time, how this beneficial role can be reinforced by organization-based self-esteem, as a critical personal resource.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Annette H. Dunham and Christopher D.B. Burt

The aim of this paper is to test a model of the relationship between organizational memory and empowerment. The model posited that organizational memory would be related

3519

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to test a model of the relationship between organizational memory and empowerment. The model posited that organizational memory would be related to requests to share knowledge, psychological empowerment in the workplace (meaning, competence, self‐determination and impact), and organization‐based self‐esteem.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested with 134 employees representing six companies using hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Significant relationships were found between organizational memory and requests to share knowledge, empowerment, and organization‐based self‐esteem. Findings indicated that a positive stereotype may exist towards older workers and the frequency they are requested to share knowledge, and that a halo‐type effect may operate, where knowledge of an organization's history is generalized to other knowledge domains.

Research limitations/implications

Causal implications cannot be made as this was correlational research. Some of the research measures while achieving acceptable to good reliability were in an early development stage. The study utilized a convenience sample that may limit how the results can be generalized.

Practical implications

The paper indicates that organizations can emphasize positive outcomes for those who are knowledge repositories and mentors. It is also important to consider possible “positive stereotypes” which may be operating when organizational members evaluate older workers as knowledge repositories and mentors.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the assumptions in the human resources literature concerning the role of older workers as repositories of organizational memory and suitable mentors. The study introduces the “requests to share knowledge scale”.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 May 2021

Muhammad Rehan Masoom

This research investigates the mediation effect of perceived organizational support on the relationship between organization-based self-esteem and perceived occupational…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates the mediation effect of perceived organizational support on the relationship between organization-based self-esteem and perceived occupational stress of teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

The present quantitative venture follows a causal research design to unveil the relationship among organization based self-esteem (independent variable), perceived occupational stress (dependent variable) and perceived organizational support (intervening variable). The research surveys 813 educators from nineteen selected distinct areas of Dhaka city; the survey instrument has twenty-six items apart from some general inquires about the respondents. To address the dynamic interplay among these variables, a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) is conducted within a structural equation modeling (SEM) framework.

Findings

Teachers with low self-esteem perceived a high level of occupational stress, whereas teachers who perceived high organizational support feel low occupational stress. Increasing organizational support not only increases organization-based self-esteem but also mediates the relationship between self-esteem and occupational stress.

Practical implications

Teachers' stress is not only an increasing problem over the years but also it was one of the top six most stressful professions. The present study outlines the possible organizational initiatives that can reduce the stresses of the teaching profession.

Originality/value

The findings of the present study square with several theoretical frameworks such as the job demands–resources (JD–R) model and conservation of resources (COR) theory. The results highlight the fact that allowing school teachers to express their ideas and points of view makes them feel esteemed. Likewise, good relations with the school head and getting positive feedback are found to be contributing factors. The teachers feel lesson planning overburdensome and undue office inspections hurt their self-esteem. Any school can increase the self-esteem of the teachers by providing support and training to adjust to changes.

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2022

Dirk De Clercq and Renato Pereira

For human resource (HR) managers, the harmful outcomes of employees’ ruminations about external crises, such as a pandemic, represent important, timely concerns. This…

Abstract

Purpose

For human resource (HR) managers, the harmful outcomes of employees’ ruminations about external crises, such as a pandemic, represent important, timely concerns. This research postulates that employees’ perceptions of pandemic threats might diminish the extent to which they engage in change-oriented voluntarism at work. This negative connection may be attenuated by employees’ access to two personal (work-related self-efficacy and organization-based self-esteem) and two relational (goal congruence and interpersonal harmony) resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical predictions are tested with survey data collected among employees who work in a banking organization in Portugal.

Findings

Persistent negative thoughts about a pandemic undermine discretionary efforts to alter and enhance the organizational status quo, but this detrimental effect is mitigated when employees (1) feel confident about their work-related abilities, (2) have a positive self-image about their organizational functioning, (3) share a common mindset with coworkers with respect to work goals and (4) maintain harmonious relationships with coworkers.

Practical implications

This study pinpoints several ways HR managers can reduce the danger that employees’ worries about life-threatening crises may lead to complacent responses that, somewhat paradoxically, might undermine their ability to alleviate the suffered hardships.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to research on the impact of external crisis situations on organizations by providing an explanation of why employees may avoid productive, disruptive work activities, contingent on their access to complementary resources.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, Marc G. Singer and Sharon Roberts

The authors collected data from 295 randomly selected employees, four months after the company’s first labor union certification election. Results of separate multiple…

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Abstract

The authors collected data from 295 randomly selected employees, four months after the company’s first labor union certification election. Results of separate multiple regression analyses suggested that job security, extrinsic job satisfaction, and organization‐based self‐esteem (OBSE) were predictors of organizational instrumentality for both males and females. For men, the division where they work, low desire to change, and low consideration were related to their organizational instrumentality, whereas for women, low income, the Japanese management style, and the Protestant Work Ethic were related to their organizational instrumentality. Non‐professional men had a stronger belief that money represents their achievement than professional men. Professional women had a stronger interest in intrinsic job satisfaction than non‐professional women. Both male and female professionals valued Japanese management style. Results are discussed in light of managers’ efforts in satisfying employees’ needs and union leaders’ efforts in organizing their targets.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Su-Ying Pan and Yuquan Li

This study aims to focus on a relatively unexplored area: single employees’ non-work needs. With social information processing theory as the basis, the authors examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on a relatively unexplored area: single employees’ non-work needs. With social information processing theory as the basis, the authors examine the process whereby a singles-friendly work culture leads to multiple desirable outcomes for single employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 472 single employees working in the hospitality sector in China. A model with three mediating paths was tested using Mplus 7.2 software.

Findings

The authors found that organization-based self-esteem mediates the relationship between a singles-friendly work culture and emotional exhaustion; procedural justice mediates the relationship between a singles-friendly work culture and organizational commitment and hostility mediate the relationship between a singles-friendly work culture and helping behaviors directed toward coworkers.

Practical implications

The present study reminds hotel managers that establishing a singles-friendly work culture is a new strategy to retain and attract talented single employees.

Originality/value

Inspired by the work of Casper et al. (2007), the authors examined the importance of equal employment opportunities for single employees, who are the major workforce in the hotel industry but are often ignored in academic research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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