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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Mike Schraeder, Rachel S. Tears and Mark H. Jordan

To provide two possible approaches for enhancing organizational culture awareness and promote cultural change in public sector organization. These approaches include…

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Abstract

Purpose

To provide two possible approaches for enhancing organizational culture awareness and promote cultural change in public sector organization. These approaches include training and leading by example.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature outlining fundamental aspects of organizational culture is summarized, serving as a foundation for reviewing the potential value of training as a method for enhancing public managers' awareness of organizational culture. This is followed by an illustrated example of how the culture was changed in major department of a public organization through leading by example.

Findings

Training and leading by example can serve as effective methodologies for promoting culture awareness and brining about culture change in organizations.

Practical implications

The article highlights some interesting similarities and differences between cultures in public organizations and cultures in private sector organizations. The differences, in particular, reinforce the importance of training and leading by example to guide public sector employees through the complex dynamics often embodied within culture transformations in organizations.

Originality/value

While there are some important similarities between cultures of private sector and public sector organizations, the differences existing in public sector organization cultures create unique challenges for managers trying to evoke change. The article provides a unique perspective on applying training and leading by example to the context of public sector organizational culture.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Kent V. Rondeau and Terry H. Wagar

Organizational scholars and practitioners alike have long recognized the role of corporate culture in shaping the strategic and operational choices that organizations

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Abstract

Organizational scholars and practitioners alike have long recognized the role of corporate culture in shaping the strategic and operational choices that organizations pursue. It is the responsibility of those who plan for change to select approaches that are compatible with the enduring elements of the organization’s dominant culture. A large sample of Canadian hospitals were surveyed to assess how organizational culture impacts the choices that organizations make in managing fiscal cutbacks. Results suggest that approaches and strategies used by Canadian hospitals in managing the change are variably influenced by CEO perceptions of the prevailing corporate culture.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Bob Norton

One of the major areas of concern of information management is the collective use, exchange and development of the information activities of the organization in order to…

Abstract

One of the major areas of concern of information management is the collective use, exchange and development of the information activities of the organization in order to achieve its objectives. For this to be effective, either information management will require the right kind of environment or culture in which to operate, or it will have to be instrumental in creating that culture. An organization's culture is shaped by many factors — history, experience, values, beliefs, successes, failures, the environment in which it operates, and the personalities which lead it. Culture, however, cannot be precisely defined because it is something that is perceived, something that is felt. It also has much to do with the way people are managed. Information management can have an impact on the organization's culture although the opposite is more often the case especially in terms of organizational structure, the distribution of power, the organization's image, the style of the chief officer, risk‐taking and change, secrecy and openness and the way people work together and cooperate, or don't. Information management is also about how people interact with systems. There are, in brief, two contrasting ways in which this can happen; one which puts systems first, the other which puts people first. Evidence is now growing that people must come first and can no longer work in purely mechanistic ways in which they become data‐processors on number‐crunchers. An ideal working culture may be one where people can develop satisfactorily with the systems to which they contribute but which do not put them in a straitjacket. How can this be achieved? What kinds of culture generally exist within organizations? Are there any types of culture which may be more conducive and receptive to information management? Similarly, can the culture of an organization be changed? Can it be managed?

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Abstract

Details

Knowledge Economies and Knowledge Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-778-3

Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Yurdanur Yumuk and Hülya Kurgun

Human resources are of great importance to provide competitive advantage in tourism, which is a labour-intensive industry. It is seen that the level of organizational…

Abstract

Human resources are of great importance to provide competitive advantage in tourism, which is a labour-intensive industry. It is seen that the level of organizational commitment of the individuals who have similar values with the organization they work for and who can fulfil the roles and duties they undertake and who can meet all their needs in return increases. Their level of alienation is also observed to decrease. Population of the study, which purposes to reveal whether organizational culture has any impact on the employees' perception of person-organization fit and their level of organizational alienation or not, constitutes 4- and 5-star hotels in service in the central district of Izmir province. According to the results, it was seen that hotel businesses had two types of organizational culture such as hierarchy and clan culture. In the hotels with clan culture, demands-abilities fit levels of the worker were higher than value-congruence and needs-supplies dimensions. It was seen that workers alienated on meaninglessness dimension mostly. Similarly, in the hotels with hierarchy culture, demands-abilities fit levels of the worker were higher than value-congruence and needs-supplies dimensions. Workers alienated from their organization on meaninglessness dimension mostly.

Details

Sustainable Hospitality Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-266-4

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Learning Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-431-9

Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Azizah Ahmad

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive…

Abstract

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive advantage provided by BI capability is not well researched. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for successful BI deployment and empirically examines the association between BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage. Taking the telecommunications industry in Malaysia as a case example, the research particularly focuses on the influencing perceptions held by telecommunications decision makers and executives on factors that impact successful BI deployment. The research further investigates the relationship between successful BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage of the telecommunications organizations. Another important aim of this study is to determine the effect of moderating factors such as organization culture, business strategy, and use of BI tools on BI deployment and the sustainability of firm’s competitive advantage.

This research uses combination of resource-based theory and diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory to examine BI success and its relationship with firm’s sustainability. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and a two-phase sequential mixed method consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches are employed. A tentative research model is developed first based on extensive literature review. The chapter presents a qualitative field study to fine tune the initial research model. Findings from the qualitative method are also used to develop measures and instruments for the next phase of quantitative method. The study includes a survey study with sample of business analysts and decision makers in telecommunications firms and is analyzed by partial least square-based structural equation modeling.

The findings reveal that some internal resources of the organizations such as BI governance and the perceptions of BI’s characteristics influence the successful deployment of BI. Organizations that practice good BI governance with strong moral and financial support from upper management have an opportunity to realize the dream of having successful BI initiatives in place. The scope of BI governance includes providing sufficient support and commitment in BI funding and implementation, laying out proper BI infrastructure and staffing and establishing a corporate-wide policy and procedures regarding BI. The perceptions about the characteristics of BI such as its relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, and observability are also significant in ensuring BI success. The most important results of this study indicated that with BI successfully deployed, executives would use the knowledge provided for their necessary actions in sustaining the organizations’ competitive advantage in terms of economics, social, and environmental issues.

This study contributes significantly to the existing literature that will assist future BI researchers especially in achieving sustainable competitive advantage. In particular, the model will help practitioners to consider the resources that they are likely to consider when deploying BI. Finally, the applications of this study can be extended through further adaptation in other industries and various geographic contexts.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-764-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Pamela G. Bourland-Davis and Beverly L. Graham

Tapping into an organization’s stories provides an opportunity to examine the organization’s culture and promotes understanding of ways an organization represents itself…

Abstract

Tapping into an organization’s stories provides an opportunity to examine the organization’s culture and promotes understanding of ways an organization represents itself. Using a communication audit research method to examine organizational culture at a healthcare facility in the southeastern United States during a major change, the study reported in this chapter examines interplay among public relations (PR), human resources (HR) management, and corporate social responsibility or sustainability programs. Use of this research method enabled identification of consistently recurring cultural themes. The results provide support for PR and HR playing an integral role in advocating for and supporting the culture of organizations, although that role may be more implicit than explicit. Findings suggest that corporate social responsibility can be an integral part of organizational culture, and may work best – serving as a source of employee pride – if efforts develop organically from within the organization with employee support.

Details

Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, and Ethical Public Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-585-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Liam Gorman

The study of corporate culture is a valuable contribution to thestudy of organisations. Corporate culture consists of values, norms,feelings, hopes and aspirations held by…

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Abstract

The study of corporate culture is a valuable contribution to the study of organisations. Corporate culture consists of values, norms, feelings, hopes and aspirations held by members of organisations. These aspects may not be instantly discernible; however, it is important that managers are aware of culture; a shared culture contributes greatly to company success. The article concludes that managers can manage culture and cultural change by becoming more aware of the deeper assumptions of culture and how they are upheld.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Catherine M. Sleezer and Richard A. Swanson

Explains the advantages of using a culture survey as part of anorganization′s change effort and examines the use of culture surveys ininformation gathering and…

Abstract

Explains the advantages of using a culture survey as part of an organization′s change effort and examines the use of culture surveys in information gathering and communication. Culture surveys, used properly, become invaluable in guiding change. Used improperly, however, they can be counterproductive. Describes the principles for designing, implementing and analysing the data resulting from a culture survey, along with a case study describing the successful application of these principles in one organization.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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