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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Jenny Kwai‐Sim Leung, Kieran James, Razvan V. Mustata and Carmen Giorgiana Bonaci

The purpose of this paper is to document key elements of union strategy at Sydney (Lidcombe) branch of Australia's Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document key elements of union strategy at Sydney (Lidcombe) branch of Australia's Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) in an attempt to document and critique its branch level strategy in the year immediately after the removal of the Howard‐Costello Government.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used in analysing data obtained from internal CFMEU documents and correspondence; interviews with the New South Wales State Secretary of the CFMEU Andrew Ferguson, union organisers, one former organiser who worked for a number of years at Western Sydney but is now with a white‐collar union in the education sector, and construction workers; CFMEU official publications; news media stories and a series of building site visits. The authors use a theory framework of Roman Catholic social teaching to frame the discussions and analyze the case study findings.

Findings

In focus groups with construction workers, the authors find one challenging external constraint for the CFMEU: reaching out to and meeting effectively the needs of younger workers especially those from families hostile to unionism. However, younger workers seem to hold a mix of individualistic and collectivist philosophies. The final case shows the CFMEU organiser Tulloch to be adaptable and flexible in the heat of industrial disputation. Finally, the fact that building workers brought the asbestos issue to CFMEU's attention in the final case study shows union willingness to pursue issues not initiated by the union.

Originality/value

The paper documents the fact that the CFMEU has the ability and potential to rebuild its influence on building sites in Sydney and win further favourable outcomes for exploited and vulnerable workers within its sphere of influence. Through the theoretical framework, the authors point that as it does so it will assist in bringing to fruition the Roman Catholic social teaching that presents strong trade unions as a valid form of collective voice for workers and a way for collective and individual labour to retain in practice the dignity that God has already clothed them with.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Dominic Wring

Examines the historical role of marketing within the British electoral process. Based on historical research and drawing on a voluminous amount of documentary analysis…

Abstract

Examines the historical role of marketing within the British electoral process. Based on historical research and drawing on a voluminous amount of documentary analysis, seeks to assess how and when marketing thinking and techniques first began to gain currency within the British Labour Party between 1918 and 1939. Demonstrates how Labour, an organisation traditionally regarded as being resistant to change, contained influential people keen to experiment with new campaign techniques and ideas.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Dennis Nicholson

The Psion organiser is a small hand‐sized computer about the size of a (thick) pocket diary. Despite its size, it is a complete computer by any reasonable definition, with…

Abstract

The Psion organiser is a small hand‐sized computer about the size of a (thick) pocket diary. Despite its size, it is a complete computer by any reasonable definition, with processor, 16–32Kbyte memory, operating system, programming language, resident software, and the ability to communicate with peripherals such as printers and light pens, as well as with other microcomputers. The resident programs are an electronic diary, a personal database system, a calculator, a clock, an alarm facility and a programming facility. The programming facility allows programs to be created, edited, saved, compiled and inserted into the main menu in such a way that they may be run with a single keystroke.

Details

Program, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Sabine Elisabeth Töppig and Miguel Moital

To establish how and why exhibition managers manage circulation, this study explores the techniques (specific activities used to influence circulation), outputs (tangible…

Abstract

Purpose

To establish how and why exhibition managers manage circulation, this study explores the techniques (specific activities used to influence circulation), outputs (tangible enhancements in the performance of the exhibition resulting from changes in circulation dynamics) and outcomes (benefits of those enhancements to exhibitors, attendees and the exhibition organiser) of circulation management.

Design/methodology/approach

In face-to-face interviews, 10 exhibition managers were asked how and why they manage attendee circulation, which also involved a card-sorting exercise to elicit tacit circulation management knowledge. Four different experienced exhibitions managers from three continents were asked to validate the findings.

Findings

Four types of techniques were identified: magnet, layout, curiosity and playfulness and guiding techniques, with these implemented to achieve five outputs: greater footfall, better exposure to exhibits, enhanced navigation, greater buzz and managing congestion levels. The results further show that circulation was managed to achieve a variety of organiser-, exhibitor- and attendee-related outcomes. The study uncovered a large range of factors influencing the employment of circulation management techniques. Conflicts in outputs resulting from several techniques are highlighted, requiring the exhibition manager to establish which outputs and resulting outcomes take priority over others.

Originality/value

This exploratory study is the first study to propose a circulation management model for the exhibition context, equipping exhibition managers with knowledge to strategically manage attendee circulation.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

Edmund Heery, Rick Delbridge, Melanie Simms, John Salmon and David H Simpson

As trade unions have continued to decline in membership and influence across the developed economies, so academic attention has turned to the prospects for renewal and a…

Abstract

As trade unions have continued to decline in membership and influence across the developed economies, so academic attention has turned to the prospects for renewal and a search for the conditions under which it might plausibly occur (Fairbrother, 2000; Martin & Ross, 1999; Turner, 1999). One leg of this search has been directed towards the changing context which unions face and has resulted in the prescription that unions must change their policies, structures and culture to accommodate a “new workforce” (Cobble, 1994; Heckscher, 1988; Wever, 1998). A second leg has been directed within unions themselves and has been concerned more with the internal processes through which renewal can take place (Fiorito et al., 1995; Hurd, 1998; Pocock, 1998). In the U.K., two distinctive theories of change in trade unions have emerged along this second line of inquiry, one of which, the “rank and file” model, holds that significant change occurs from the bottom-up and requires the mobilisation of members against a conservative leadership (Fairbrother, 1996). The other, the “managerial” model, claims the opposite is true and that renewal is conditional on effective systems of union management and occurs from the top–down (Willman et al., 1993). Both theories are venerable and in Britain their roots can be traced on the one hand to the Webbs and their conviction that effective unions required professional leadership and on the other to the apostles of industrial syndicalism (Fox, 1985, pp. 66, 256–260). They continue to structure debate, however, and the purpose of this article is to provide an empirical examination of each with regard to an issue, which seemingly is critical to the internal renewal of unions, the development of organising activity.

Details

Labor Revitalization: Global Perspectives and New Initiatives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-153-8

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Felice F. Martinello and Charlotte Yates

Cluster analysis is applied to the union and employer tactics used in a sample of Ontario organising campaigns to identify the combinations of tactics or strategies that…

Abstract

Cluster analysis is applied to the union and employer tactics used in a sample of Ontario organising campaigns to identify the combinations of tactics or strategies that are used most often. Seven union organising strategies and five employer resistance strategies are revealed. Contingency table analysis shows that the union and employer strategies are not independent of one another. More active campaigns by one side (in terms of more tactics used) are met by more active campaigns by the other side. Regression analysis is used to estimate the effects of the strategies on the outcome of the organising campaign. The most active strategies, including intensive communication with workers and worker committees, work best for the employers. For unions, strategies emphasising personal communication through house calls are the most effective.

Details

Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-305-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2018

Neil Richardson

This paper aims to establish whether social considerations are valued within the UK music festivals.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish whether social considerations are valued within the UK music festivals.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study featuring 21 semi-structured interviews with stakeholders delivering seven music festivals. Thematic analysis enabled identification of insights into differences between organisers and suppliers.

Findings

The respondents were positive towards sustainability; however, CSR had little recognition. Both stakeholder groups adopted “ethical” practices. Suppliers want organisers to be transparent and fair. Organisers want supplier to comply with their approaches. All stakeholders need to improve their communications.

Research limitations/implications

As a small qualitative study, it is not representative of the sector. Furthermore, suppliers may be unwilling to critique festivals. Social desirability bias may be evident.

Practical implications

Festivals operate in increasingly competitive environments; hence, the insights herein should improve stakeholder and festivalgoer engagement.

Social implications

The stakeholders exhibited diverse sustainability orientations and unfailingly made the business case for SMEs adopting sustainable practices. Ethical practices herein seek partly to address social exclusion. Organisers have attracted festivalgoers who are not averse to the notion that societal endeavours are not just good for society, but also good for them.

Originality/value

Few studies of the adoption of social considerations exist within the creative industries.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Adrian Devine and Frances Devine

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the structure of government-funded event agencies affected the development of the events industry in Northern Ireland. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the structure of government-funded event agencies affected the development of the events industry in Northern Ireland. The institutional arrangements for two agencies which operated at different times in Northern Ireland were analysed.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 62 in-depth interviews were conducted with event organisers and public officials who had worked directly with these two organisations.

Findings

The standalone National Events Agency which began operating in 1999 was found to be more hands-on and worked closely with event organisers to develop the quality of their event. As a quango it worked at arms length from government. Unfortunately it abused this freedom and used public monies to manage its own events, highlighting the need for transparency and accountability when managing this type of agency. In 2008 it was replaced by an Events Unit which was set up within the National Tourism Organisation. Under this structure event tourism and not event development was the priority. For the events industry this created development issues and reduced its clout at government level.

Originality/value

This paper addressed a gap in the literature and found that the institutional arrangements did affect how a government-funded events agency operated and what it regarded as a strategic priority. This in turn had repercussions for the development of the events industry.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Trudie Walters, Raphaela Stadler and Allan Stewart Jepson

The importance of events for marginalised groups has largely been overlooked within tourism, hospitality and event studies. The purpose of this study is to address this…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of events for marginalised groups has largely been overlooked within tourism, hospitality and event studies. The purpose of this study is to address this gap, emphasising the positive outcomes of power relationships rather than the negative, which have traditionally been the focus in event studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated eight events for indigenous and ethnic minority groups, rural women, disabled people and seniors in Australia and New Zealand. Qualitative data was collected via participant observation, reflexive ethnography, semi-structured interviews and in-the-moment conversations. An inductive thematic approach was taken to data analysis.

Findings

Eight themes around notions of power and empowerment were identified during the analysis: providing a platform, giving/taking ownership, gaining confidence, empowering with/through knowledge, respect, pride and affirmation, freedom to “be” and resistance. These were then viewed through the lenses of social-structural and psychological empowerment, enabling a deeper understanding of power at/through events.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a framework for empowerment that enables event organisers to both understand and deliberately plan for the productive use of power, which can reaffirm important event aims, objectives and values. It can also be used by researchers as a framework through which to identify and assess the contributing elements of empowerment at events and by local government to guide policymaking around events.

Originality/value

This study is the first to highlight best practices for the positive use of power at events that “empowers” marginalised groups. Grounded in empowerment theory, the study offers a new lens to reframe notions of power and provides a theoretical framework that will be of value for both critical event studies researchers, event organisers and policymakers alike.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Elsa Bawani Satkunasingam and Bala Shanmugam

To provide arguments in favour of legalising rotating savings and credit associations (ROSCAs) as they play an important role in savings and credit for women in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide arguments in favour of legalising rotating savings and credit associations (ROSCAs) as they play an important role in savings and credit for women in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper refers to previous studies on ROSCAs in Malaysia and extracts information that shows that ROSCAs are used mostly by women as a method of forced‐savings, credit and insurance against uncertainties. It suggests different methods that can be used to make ROSCAs more efficient. Finally, it provides suggestions for amendments to existing legislation which will not interfere with the social structure that supports ROSCAs, yet permit participants to sue defaulters.

Findings

The findings show that ROSCAs are widely practised in Malaysia especially in the rural and suburban areas. The participants are mostly women from middle income and low‐income groups who used it as a form of savings or credit. The benefits of permitting ROSCAs outweigh the risks. Legalising ROSCAs will not remove the benefits but will substantially reduce the risks.

Originality/value

This paper provides arguments to legalise ROSCAs in Malaysia and provides suggestions to ensure greater efficiency and a lower default rate. It also suggests amendments to the legislation to enable participants to take quick and cheap legal action against defaulters.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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