Search results

1 – 10 of over 131000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Mona Ashok, Mouza Saeed Mohammed Al Badi Al Dhaheri, Rohit Madan and Michael D. Dzandu

Knowledge management (KM) is associated with higher performance and innovative culture; KM can help the public sector to be fiscally lean and meet diverse stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge management (KM) is associated with higher performance and innovative culture; KM can help the public sector to be fiscally lean and meet diverse stakeholders’ needs. However, hierarchical structures, bureaucratic culture and rigid processes inhibit KM adoption and generate inertia. This study aims to explore the nature and causes of this inertia within the context of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an in-depth case study of a UAE public sector organisation, this study explores how organisational inertia can be countered to enable KM adoption. Semi-structured interviews are conducted with 17 top- and middle-level managers from operational, management and strategic levels. Interview data is triangulated with content analysis from multiple sources, including the UAE Government and case organisation documents.

Findings

The results show transformation leadership, external factors and organisational culture mediate the negative effect of inertia on KM practices adoption. We find that information technology plays a key role in enabling knowledge creation, access, adoption and sharing. Furthermore, we uncover a virtuous cycle between organisational culture and KM practices adoption in the public sector. In addition, we develop a new model (the relationship between KM practices, organisational inertia, organisational culture, transformational leadership traits and external factors) and four propositions for empirical testing by future researchers. We also present a cross-case comparison of our results with six private/quasi-private sector cases who have implemented KM practices.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative data is collected from a single case study.

Originality/value

Inertia in a public section is a result of bureaucracy and authority bounded by the rules and regulations. Adopting a qualitative methodology and case study method, the research explores the phenomena of how inertia impacts KM adoption in public sector environments. Our findings reveal the underlying mechanisms of how internal and external organisational factors impact inertia. Internally, supportive organisational culture and transformational leadership traits positively effect KM adoption, which, in turn, has a positive effect on organisational culture to counter organisational inertia. Externally, a progressive national culture, strategy and policy can support a knowledge-based organisation that embraces change. This study develops a new model (interactions between internal and external factors impacting KM practices in the public sector), four propositions and a new two-stage process model for KM adoption in the public sector. We present a case-comparison of how the constructs interact in a public sector as compared to six private/quasi-private sector cases from the literature.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Kerstin A. Aumann and Cheri Ostroff

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular…

Abstract

In recent years, theory and research have been increasingly devoted to understanding organizational behavior in cross-cultural and global contexts, with particular attention being paid to the appropriateness of various human resources management (HRM) practices because practices that may be effective within one cultural context may not be effective in other cultural contexts. This chapter argues that a multi-level perspective is needed to explain the interplay between HRM practices and employee responses across cultural contexts. Specifically, the multi-level framework developed in this chapter elucidates the importance of fit between HRM practices, individual values, organizational values, and societal values. Societal values play a key role in the adoption of HRM practices, and the effectiveness of these HRM practices will depend largely on “fit” or alignment with the values of the societal culture in which the organization is operating. HRM practices also shape the collective responses of employees through organizational climate at the organizational level and through psychological climate at the individual level. For positive employee attitudes and responses to emerge, the climate created by the HRM practices must be aligned with societal and individual values. Building on these notions, the strength of the societal culture in which the organization is operating serves as a mechanism that links relationships between climate, value fit, and attitudes across levels of analysis. The chapter concludes with some recommendations for future research and implications for practice.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Mary Ann Glynn and Ryan Raffaelli

The institutional logics perspective highlights how organizations are embedded within broader systems of meaning and how this embeddedness activates salient institutional…

Abstract

The institutional logics perspective highlights how organizations are embedded within broader systems of meaning and how this embeddedness activates salient institutional logics in organizations that can enable or constrain organizational decisions, practices, and actions. We investigate a core premise of the institutional logics perspective, that of the alignment of institutional logics and organizational practices and design, in the organizational adoption of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) practices. We hypothesize that, in the adoption of practices, organizations will house those practices in structural units that align with the logic emphasized by the practice: when adopting practices reflecting a market logic, organizations will locate them in mainline business units, such as marketing; conversely, when adopting practices reflecting a community logic, organizations will locate them in non-mainline business units, such as corporate or philanthropic foundations. Using survey and archival data from 161 Fortune 500 (F500) firms, we find support for our hypotheses. Our findings reveal how institutional logics serve as underlying lynchpins, connecting organizational practices to organizational design so as to reinforce and enable each other.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Rabindra Kumar Pradhan, Lalatendu Kesari Jena and Nrusingh Prasad Panigrahy

Sustainability is seeking for a new approach to bolster organisational success as it is expected to be mobilised through collaborative efforts of employees and management…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability is seeking for a new approach to bolster organisational success as it is expected to be mobilised through collaborative efforts of employees and management. The present study aims to examine the moderating role of sustainability practices between self-efficacy and organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 527 full-time executives employed in Indian public and private manufacturing industries were surveyed. Harman’s single-factor test was carried out using analysis of moment structures (AMOS 20.0) to test the bias associated because of common method variance (CMV). Moderated regression analysis was used through hierarchical models to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate a positive relationship between self-efficacy and OCB. The significant moderation effect was observed in the interaction graph, as the simple slope analysis indicated relatively high level of sustainability practices and self-efficacy and they were found to be positively associated with OCB.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional sample of executives employed in Indian manufacturing organisations limits the generalisation of the findings. The study has not figured the temporal effects and hence longitudinal studies have also been proposed for the assessment of causality.

Practical implications

Organisations are expected to foster inclusiveness and open channel of communication with their employees to execute best sustainable practices. HR department need to create awareness among their employees and establish an ongoing feedback mechanism to promote such psychological drives.

Originality/value

The proposed model and the subsequent findings of the study extend the literature on the relationship among self-efficacy, OCB and sustainability practices. The outcome of this work can be used by HR functionaries and senior management practitioners while formulating and implementing the sustainability strategies.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2020

Hind Lebdaoui and Youssef Chetioui

This paper aims to examine a model that uses customer service quality as an intervening mechanism in the relationship between customer relationship management (CRM…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine a model that uses customer service quality as an intervening mechanism in the relationship between customer relationship management (CRM) practices and organizational performance in two different banking structures: conventional and Islamic. The study focuses on organizational and technological practices of CRM, as both have been demonstrated to be critical to CRM success.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on responses from 247 managers from conventional banks and 141 managers from Islamic banks operating in Morocco using a self-administered questionnaire. The partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) technique is employed for data analysis.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that customer service quality plays a mediating role between CRM practices (organizational and technological) and organizational performance in both conventional and Islamic banks. Our results confirm the positive impact of CRM practices on organizational performance in the two banking structures.

Practical implications

This study enhances our understanding of how CRM practices contribute to improving customer service quality and organizational performance in both conventional and Islamic banks. Bank managers, who aim to deliver superior service quality and achieve customer satisfaction and retention, should capitalize on the benefits of implementing CRM organizational and technological practices.

Originality/value

The present paper bridges a gap pertaining to key practices and factors that impact CRM success in the banking industry. It is the first of its kind to investigate the effect of CRM practices on organizational performance with customer service quality as a mediating variable. The study also contributes to the field of CRM literature, as CRM has rarely been addressed in an Islamic banking context.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Marieke van den Brink

One of the urgent questions in the field of diversity is the knowledge about effective diversity practices. This paper aims to advance our knowledge on organizational

Abstract

Purpose

One of the urgent questions in the field of diversity is the knowledge about effective diversity practices. This paper aims to advance our knowledge on organizational change toward diversity by combining concepts from diversity studies and organizational learning.

Design/methodology/approach

By employing a social practice approach to organizational learning, the author will be able to go beyond individual learning experiences of diversity practices but see how members negotiate the diversity knowledge and how they integrate their new knowledge in their day-to-day organizational norms and practices. The analysis draws on data collected during a longitudinal case study in a financial service organization in the Netherlands.

Findings

This study showed how collective learning practices took place but were insufficiently anchored in a collective memory. Change agents have the task to build “new” memory on diversity policies and gender inequality as well as to use organizational memory to enable diversity policies and practices to be implemented. The inability to create a community of practice impeded the change agenda.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could expand our knowledge on collective memory of knowledge on diversity further and focus on the way employees make use of this memory while doing diversity.

Practical implications

The current literature often tends to analyze the effectiveness of diversity practices as linear processes, which is insufficient to capture the complexity of a change process characterized with layers of negotiated and politicized forms of access to resources. The author would argue for more future work on nonlinear and process-based perspectives on organizational change.

Originality/value

The contribution is to the literature on diversity practices by showing how the lack of collective memory to “store” individual learning in the organization has proven to be a major problem in the management of diversity.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Engin Aydoğan and Özcan Arslan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between human resource management (HRM) practices bundles and organizational commitment, and find answers for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between human resource management (HRM) practices bundles and organizational commitment, and find answers for questions on which of these bundles contribute how to the employees’ performance and loyalty according to their demographic characteristics in maritime market.

Design/methodology/approach

Two separate surveys were applied to 104 employees of international maritime companies. Factor and reliability analyses were carried out to ensure the surveys’ validity and reliability. Then, correlation analysis was conducted to determine whether there is a relationship between HRM practices and organizational commitment. Finally, independent groups t-test was used to determine if perceptions of employees on HRM practices and their organizational commitment vary according to their demographic characteristics.

Findings

Moderate positive and negative linear relationships between HRM practices bundles and organizational commitment were found. Also, significant differences between the organizational commitment levels of employees and their perceptions on the effects of HRM practices to their performance were determined.

Research limitations/implications

Surveys were conducted only on Turkish employees in maritime sector and companies only that published annual and social responsibility report were examined.

Practical implications

HR managers should pay attention on HRM practices bundles to increase the level of employee’s organizational commitment and performance. While doing this, they also should take their employees’ demographic characteristics on account. This study can give clues about management of employees with different perceptions on performance and commitment.

Originality/value

The authors add the literature by identifying the link between HRM practices bundles and organizational commitment. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study, which reveals the link between HRM practices bundles and organizational commitment dimensions, separately. Also, an original new questionnaire was produced, which measures the employees’ perceptions on the effects of HRM practices to performance.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2020

Faruk Bhuiyan, Kevin Baird and Rahat Munir

This study aims to investigate the influence of organisational culture, specifically O’Reilly et al.’s (1991) six dimensions of the organisational culture profile (respect…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the influence of organisational culture, specifically O’Reilly et al.’s (1991) six dimensions of the organisational culture profile (respect for people, outcome orientation, team orientation, innovation, attention to detail and stability) on corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices and the subsequent impact of CSR practices on organisational performance from the context of an emerging economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a survey of middle- and higher-level managers in Bangladeshi organisations to develop a seven-dimensional model of CSR practices and used structural equation modelling to analyse the developed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings provide evidence of the influence of the six different dimensions of organisational culture on the different dimensions of CSR practices. The findings highlight the diverse impacts (i.e. positive and negative) of CSR practices on organisational performance. The study also highlights the direct influence of organisational culture on both financial and non-financial performance. In particular, the outcome and team orientation culture are positively associated with non-financial and financial performance, respectively, while an innovative culture is negatively associated with both non-financial and financial performance.

Practical implications

The findings of the study provide practitioners, internal (i.e. the managers and business owners of both the local and multinational organisations) and external policy-makers, and foreign investors in an emerging economy with new insights into the role of an intra-organisational factor (i.e. organisational culture) in influencing the adoption of CSR practices and the subsequent impact of CSR practices on organisational performance.

Originality/value

Using the 52 guidelines of CSR practices provided by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, this study provides a unique empirical insight into the influence of organisational culture on CSR practices and the impact of CSR practices on organisational performance. The findings contribute to the limited CSR literature examining the influence of organisational culture on the adoption of CSR practices and its subsequent impact on organisational performance in an emerging economy.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Donald L. Anderson

Following Bakhtin, organizational discourse scholars have examined ways in which organizational actors draw on and negotiate historical texts, weave them with contemporary…

Abstract

Purpose

Following Bakhtin, organizational discourse scholars have examined ways in which organizational actors draw on and negotiate historical texts, weave them with contemporary ones, and transform them into future discourses. This paper examines how this practice occurs discursively as members in a high‐tech corporation conduct an organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper interprets discourse excerpts from meetings of a project team in the western US. Through participant‐observation and discourse analytic methods, the data gathered consists of field notes, over 33 hours' worth of team meeting conversation and five hours of interview data.

Findings

Through the use of represented voice, organizational members work out how an action or practice has sounded in the past as spoken by another member, and they articulate how proposed organizational changes might sound in the future. By making these inferences, members are able to discursively translate between a single situated utterance and organizational practices.

Practical implications

The analysis suggests that organizational change occurs when people temporarily stabilize the organization through the voicing of current practices (as references to what “usually happens” via what is “usually said”) and new practices (as references to what might be said in the future). It is when these practices are solidified and made real through these translations between identity, voice, and organizational practices that members are able to draw comparisons and transformations between “past” and “future” language, and thereby experience and achieve organizational change.

Originality/value

The paper furthers our knowledge of how organizational members discursively negotiate meanings during the process of organizational change through a specific discourse pattern.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

David Cegarra‐Leiva, M. Eugenia Sánchez‐Vidal and Juan Gabriel Cegarra‐Navarro

This study aims to explore the impact of the availability of work life balance (WLB) practices on organisational outcomes in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the impact of the availability of work life balance (WLB) practices on organisational outcomes in small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) mediated by the existence of a culture that supports WLB.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was performed with a sample of 229 SMEs representing the metal industry sector of Southeast Spain.

Findings

The findings show that a WLB supportive culture mediates the effect of the availability of WLB practices on organisational performance.

Research limitations/implications

Among the limitations of this study the authors highlight the transverse nature of the research and the data collection based on self‐reports.

Practical implications

Companies interested in increasing organisational outcomes should introduce WLB practices. Moreover, practitioners should enhance an organisational culture positive towards employees' balance, communicating their support towards WLB initiatives.

Social implications

The availability of WLB initiatives in the organisations generates not only positive outcomes for employees (e.g. reduction of inter‐role conflict, higher satisfaction, etc.), but also increases the organisational results for employers.

Originality/value

This research focuses on SMEs and the results have implications for practitioners and academics.

1 – 10 of over 131000