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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

S.E. Gouvea da Costa and E. Pinheiro de Lima

Although, the advanced manufacturing technologies (AMT) benefits and potentialities are already known, issues regarding the management process, from the planning to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although, the advanced manufacturing technologies (AMT) benefits and potentialities are already known, issues regarding the management process, from the planning to the implementation, represent the main barriers to the effective use of such technologies. The actual benefits of the AMT incorporation to the manufacturing system, classified as systemic, will only be obtained and recognized if the current design and organizational structure become compatible with the change being introduced. The purpose of this paper is to present the rationality for the organizational design development related to AMT adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The developed theoretical synthesis integrates two refined and tested frameworks: the organizational design and the strategic selections of AMT. The company's manufacturing strategy, specifically the manufacturing vision, defines a set of statements, the required competences, which constitute the organizational design specifications. By approaching the AMT as resources related to the manufacturing vision competences, it could be assured the cohesion between the organizational design and the technology to be introduced. The theoretical development is illustrated by some empirical data, particularly in the cases of competences, capabilities and manufacturing vision statements formulation.

Findings

This paper is a theoretical construction that organizes and synthesizes the issues that are being studied in the main theme: “The adoption of the automated systems,” focusing the discussion on the manufacturing strategy and organizational design domains.

Research limitations/implications

The generated framework is theoretical in essence and needs to be tested, although the theoretical exercise integrates tested frameworks.

Practical implications

The understanding of the relationships between the process of AMT adoption and the required changes in the organization contribute to the attainment of the benefits related to those technologies.

Originality/value

The main value of the present paper is the theoretical exercise to generate a set of recommendations of the organizational design‐revision process. The systemic design approached used will found future research to generate practical solutions for the design process, contributing to the AMT integration to the manufacturing system.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Jan Achterbergh and Dirk Vriens

The purpose of this paper is to show how the viable system model (VSM) and de Sitter's design theory can complement each other in the context of the diagnosis and design

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the viable system model (VSM) and de Sitter's design theory can complement each other in the context of the diagnosis and design of viable organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Key concepts from Beer's model and de Sitter's design theory are introduced and analyzed in order to show how they relate.

Findings

The VSM provides insight into the related systems necessary and sufficient for viability. As such, it specifies criteria supporting the diagnosis and design of organizational infrastructures, i.e. of organizational structures, HR systems, and technology. However, it does not explicitly conceptualize and provide a detailed heuristic for the design of organizational structures. De Sitter's theory fills in this gap.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates how, based on a rudimentary model of organizational viability, de Sitter's design theory positively addresses the question of how to diagnose and design organizational structures that add to the viability of organizations.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 40 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Igor Gurkov and Alexander Settles

The purpose of this paper is to address issues related to organizational design and strategy fit by examining the “strategic stretch” that occurs when there exists a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address issues related to organizational design and strategy fit by examining the “strategic stretch” that occurs when there exists a mismatch between an organization's structure and firm‐level strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper contains a discussion of relevant issues and a presentation of research that considers the relationship between organizational design, strategy selection, and the competitive environment within which a firm operates. This research includes an analysis of a survey of top managers and an evaluation of organizational design and firm strategy to determine the existence of strategic misfit.

Findings

Misfits in strategy and structure exist because of Russian managerial proclivity to maintain direct control through centralization of all strategic formulations and because of high risk‐taking behaviors of Russian managers. While organizational inertia is a clear driver of organizational structure, cultural inertia also exists and, in the case of Russian organizational design, societal organizational culture drives strategy misfits.

Practical implications

An understanding of strategic misfits is crucial for managers so that they may recognize these disconnects early and make improvements as market or firm conditions changes. The results of the analysis of Russian firms suggest that in designing efficient organizations, greater attention should be placed on the specific impact of societal organizational culture. In addition, practitioners in organizational design consulting positions should make clear, whenever they attempt to eliminate misfits between existing structures and current strategies, the need to develop effective stretch for implementation of intended strategies.

Originality/value

The paper provides a unique application of the connection of strategy and organizational design under conditions of extreme uncertainty. This paper also extends the analysis of organizational design and strategy to firms operating in emerging markets. Rapid changes in dynamic, emerging markets provide fertile testing grounds for management theory and practices; this paper examines a unique set of empirical evidence.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2011

Dirk Vriens and Jan Achterbergh

The purpose of this paper is to use de Sitter's design theory to show how organizational structures can be designed so as to attenuate organizational disturbances and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use de Sitter's design theory to show how organizational structures can be designed so as to attenuate organizational disturbances and amplify regulatory potential. It is argued that organizational structures with low values on so‐called design‐parameters are themselves no source of disturbances and have the required built‐in regulatory potential.

Design/methodology/approach

Key concepts from de Sitter's design theory are introduced and used to show how structures can attenuate disturbances and amplify regulatory potential.

Findings

The analysis in this paper deepens our understanding of the role of organizational structures for dealing with organizational complexity, and of the design parameters that should be manipulated to achieve structural attenuation and amplification.

Practical implications

Having a structure permitting organizations to attenuate and amplify is a crucial condition for organizational viability. This paper provides guidelines for the design of such structures.

Originality/value

This is one of a limited number of studies that makes apparent how general insights from (management) cybernetic (e.g. viability, attenuation and amplification) may be realized in organizations by their structural design.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 40 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Marianne Stang Våland and Susse Georg

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the managerial implications of adopting a design attitude to organizational change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the managerial implications of adopting a design attitude to organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an ethnographic study of a merger, the paper investigates the intricate interplay between architectural design and organizational change in the context of physically relocating an organization to a new office building. Emphasis is given to the socio-materiality of this double design process.

Findings

The data suggests that taking a design attitude toward managing organizational change can allow different actors to participate in organizational design processes, releasing management from its traditional role as the keeper of the design solution.

Research limitations/implications

Although based on a single case, the paper provides insights into the socio-materiality of organizational change that is relevant in other settings where developing new collective understandings of change processes are needed.

Practical implications

A design attitude allows for multiple contributions to organizational change processes that can help reduce anxiety among those involved. The approach calls for openness, experimentation and the ability to balance different concerns. It can provide new ways of attending to resistance and produce valuable inputs to shaping organizations.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing research on the role of material artifacts in organizational studies by providing a detailed account of organizational change as a socio-material achievement.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Julien Barrier and Christine Musselin

Facing intense global competition and pressure from public authorities, several universities in Europe have engaged in merger and concentration processes. Drawing on two…

Abstract

Facing intense global competition and pressure from public authorities, several universities in Europe have engaged in merger and concentration processes. Drawing on two in-depth case studies, this paper considers university mergers as an opportunity to explore the processes involved in the creation of a new organizational structure. In line with recent scholarly calls to revisit the notion of organizational design, we combine insights from three different research streams to address the functional, political, and institutional dynamics that shaped the organizational architecture of the merged universities. Two main results are presented and discussed. First, although these mergers were initiated largely in response to the diffusion of new global institutional scripts, these scripts had little influence on organizational design: deeply institutionalized local scripts prevailed over global mimetic pressures. Second, while these institutional scripts provided many of the basic building blocks of the new universities, in both cases their design was also heavily shaped by time pressures and power games. While a few powerful actors used the merger as an opportunity to promote their own reform agenda, some of the key features of the two merged universities stemmed from choices by exclusion, whose primary aim was the avoidance of conflicts.

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Barry A. Macy, Gerard F. Farias, Jean-Francois Rosa and Curt Moore

This chapter reports on a longitudinal quasi-experimental field study within an organizational design of a global consumer products manufacturer moving toward…

Abstract

This chapter reports on a longitudinal quasi-experimental field study within an organizational design of a global consumer products manufacturer moving toward high-performance work systems (HPWSs) in North America by integrating business centers and self-directed work teams (SDWTs) coupled with 13 other action-levers within an integrated and bundled high-performance organizations (HPOs) re-design. The results of this organizational design effort are assessed using different types and levels of organizational outcomes (hard record data, behavioral, and attitudinal measures) along a 5-year temporal dimension punctuated by multiple time periods (baseline, during, and after). The organization, which was “built to change” (Lawler & Worley, 2006), in this research had already highly superior or “exemplar” (Collins, 2001) levels of organizational performance. Consequently, the real research question becomes: “What effect does state of the art organizational design and development have on an exemplar organization?” The study also calls into question the field's ability to truly assess exemplar organizations with existing measures of organizational change and development.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-425-6

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2010

Heiko Gebauer, Thomas Fischer and Elgar Fleisch

The purpose of this paper is to explore the patterns of service strategy changes in manufacturing firms and indicates how each pattern is interrelated with modifications…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the patterns of service strategy changes in manufacturing firms and indicates how each pattern is interrelated with modifications in organizational design elements.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a longitudinal study using a survey of 97 manufacturers of capital goods. In addition, 15 case studies have been conducted. Survey and qualitative data are obtained in 1997, 2001, and 2004.

Findings

The findings highlight four patterns of service strategy changes: from customer service strategy to after‐sales service provider, from after‐sales service provider to customer‐support service provider, from customer‐support service provider to development partner, and from customer‐support service provider to the outsourcing partner. Evidence of specific alignment between service strategy and organizational design elements is provided.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this paper is the purposive sample.

Practical implications

Managers should follow the patterns of service strategy changes by extending the service offerings and modifying the organizational design elements.

Originality/value

Previous studies investigate service strategies and organizational design elements only at a specific time, which leads to a static perspective. This paper offers insights into interrelations among service strategy changes and organizational design elements.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Joseph Roh, Virpi Turkulainen, Judith M. Whipple and Morgan Swink

Managing internal supply chains is becoming increasingly complex, requiring managers to balance diverse needs. As a result, managers continuously face the need to change…

Abstract

Purpose

Managing internal supply chains is becoming increasingly complex, requiring managers to balance diverse needs. As a result, managers continuously face the need to change how they organize their internal supply chains. The purpose of this paper is to examine this phenomenon by addressing why multinational supply chain management organizations (SCMOs) change their designs, as well as how managers respond to pertinent change phenomena using complementary theoretical perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data, collected from 50 executives within 24 multinational manufacturers, is used to develop an understanding of the organizational design change phenomena. A theory elaboration approach is taken to illustrate how various theoretical perspectives explain organizational design change.

Findings

This study identifies and elaborates organizational design change phenomena in the context of multinational SCMOs, including internal and external drivers of design change. Managers also discussed key supply chain management capabilities that were developed in order to meet perceived changes in business needs.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to academic understanding of organizational design issues affecting SCMOs. Four theoretical perspectives are elaborated upon to illustrate their applicability for examining SCMO organizational design issues.

Practical implications

This study provides managerial application of several organizational design change theories by elaborating principles for framing, interpreting, and implementing design change initiatives in internal SCMOs.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to investigate organizational design change in multinational SCMOs. This research highlights the complexity and evolving nature of SCMO organizational design decisions by describing the adaption, integration, and reconfiguration of firm resources and competencies in changing environments.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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