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Article

The purpose of this study is to develop a meta-model for organisational change based on a literature review across organisational theories, specific theories about…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a meta-model for organisational change based on a literature review across organisational theories, specific theories about organisational change and systems theories related to theories of organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on an extensive literature review for the period 1972–2012 which covers organisational theories, systems theories relating to organisational change theories, and specific theories of organisational change. It used the Social Sciences Citation Index using as search items change, transformation, organization[al] model, theory, systems, and combinations of these terms. The research is based on an extensive literature review for the period 1972–2012 which covers organisational theories, systems theories relating to organisational change theories, and specific theories of organisational change. It used the Social Sciences Citation Index using as search items change, transformation, organization[al] model, theory, systems, and combinations of these terms.

Findings

The meta-model is constructed as a complex systems model including the four discourses and their process elements. As each discourse provides specific and different insights into how organisational change occurs, we can widen our field of view on change by switching between different discourses. This also allows a holistic rather than the reductionist methods of other approaches.

Practical implications

The meta-model makes it possible to look at organisational change from a variety of angles. Structural, cultural, behavioral and strategic change can be looked at from four different dimensions. It allows for insights from the different discourses to be drawn upon, as each of which have their merits but also their own limitations. By going beyond the normative discourse, it provides for a model of organisational change that better reflects the complexity of change in real life settings and captures the complexity of the research literature.

Originality/value

The paper seeks to demonstrate that a systems model of change is better able to capture the complex nature of change than are linear models. Synthesizing this literature has been undertaken previously but this has usually been done with linear models of change which have produced limited results.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article

Craig C. Lundberg

Four perspectives are outlined onorganisational phenomena and threetypes of organisational change. Usingthose categories, a framework isdeveloped which identifies 12 major…

Abstract

Four perspectives are outlined on organisational phenomena and three types of organisational change. Using those categories, a framework is developed which identifies 12 major organisational communication focuses. That framework facilitates identification of the nature and purpose of organisational communication from each perspective as it relates to each type of organisational change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article

Jonathan A. Matheny

The paper depicts an exercise in which a transtheoretical model of planned personal change serves as a metaphor for planned organizational change. Implications from the…

Abstract

The paper depicts an exercise in which a transtheoretical model of planned personal change serves as a metaphor for planned organizational change. Implications from the metaphorical exercise revealed thought provoking findings regarding the limited nature of OD change processes and their ordering in an organizational intervention. Weaknesses and suggestions for future research are provided.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 13 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Marc Dorval and Marie-Hélène Jobin

This work seeks to offer a greater understanding of Lean healthcare implementation challenges conceptually taking a situated cultural organizational change perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This work seeks to offer a greater understanding of Lean healthcare implementation challenges conceptually taking a situated cultural organizational change perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive model of healthcare organizations’ Lean adoption trajectories is built using ripple and bridging modelization strategies from elements of three classic organizational change theories and knowledge from Lean, organizational culture, healthcare and operations management literature.

Findings

The “contingent Lean culture adoption” (CLCA) model suggests five theoretical trajectories the healthcare organizations may experience when conducting a Lean transformation. These trajectories evolve from a new concept of Lean cultural friction (LCF) which represents cultural friction that a healthcare organization encounters toward an ultimate Lean culture proficiency state through time. From high to low initial LCF, a healthcare organization may in its Lean proficiency course end up in three states: lower, similar or higher LCF situation.

Research limitations/implications

The CLCA model demonstrates the potential to be developed into a framework and possibly a Lean cultural friction theory pending further qualitative and quantitative validation.

Practical implications

The CLCA model may help healthcare managers to use more appropriate cultural change strategies during their organization’s Lean journey.

Originality/value

This work enriches the concept of Lean cultural change which may apply not only to healthcare organizations but also to other ones. It suggests the existence of a healthcare organization Lean culture proficiency archetype and introduces the notion of Lean cultural friction.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article

Mona Ashok, Mouza Saeed Mohammed Al Badi Al Dhaheri, Rohit Madan and Michael D. Dzandu

Knowledge management (KM) is associated with higher performance and innovative culture; KM can help the public sector to be fiscally lean and meet diverse stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge management (KM) is associated with higher performance and innovative culture; KM can help the public sector to be fiscally lean and meet diverse stakeholders’ needs. However, hierarchical structures, bureaucratic culture and rigid processes inhibit KM adoption and generate inertia. This study aims to explore the nature and causes of this inertia within the context of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an in-depth case study of a UAE public sector organisation, this study explores how organisational inertia can be countered to enable KM adoption. Semi-structured interviews are conducted with 17 top- and middle-level managers from operational, management and strategic levels. Interview data is triangulated with content analysis from multiple sources, including the UAE Government and case organisation documents.

Findings

The results show transformation leadership, external factors and organisational culture mediate the negative effect of inertia on KM practices adoption. We find that information technology plays a key role in enabling knowledge creation, access, adoption and sharing. Furthermore, we uncover a virtuous cycle between organisational culture and KM practices adoption in the public sector. In addition, we develop a new model (the relationship between KM practices, organisational inertia, organisational culture, transformational leadership traits and external factors) and four propositions for empirical testing by future researchers. We also present a cross-case comparison of our results with six private/quasi-private sector cases who have implemented KM practices.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative data is collected from a single case study.

Originality/value

Inertia in a public section is a result of bureaucracy and authority bounded by the rules and regulations. Adopting a qualitative methodology and case study method, the research explores the phenomena of how inertia impacts KM adoption in public sector environments. Our findings reveal the underlying mechanisms of how internal and external organisational factors impact inertia. Internally, supportive organisational culture and transformational leadership traits positively effect KM adoption, which, in turn, has a positive effect on organisational culture to counter organisational inertia. Externally, a progressive national culture, strategy and policy can support a knowledge-based organisation that embraces change. This study develops a new model (interactions between internal and external factors impacting KM practices in the public sector), four propositions and a new two-stage process model for KM adoption in the public sector. We present a case-comparison of how the constructs interact in a public sector as compared to six private/quasi-private sector cases from the literature.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Hong Liu, Jinfan Zhou, Huanchen Liu and Beining Xin

This research aims to investigate whether the uncertainty of gaining legitimacy from organizational change is an important antecedent of resistance to change and to…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate whether the uncertainty of gaining legitimacy from organizational change is an important antecedent of resistance to change and to explore why some enterprises are reluctant to choose institutional entrepreneurship for transformation when the uncertainty of gaining legitimacy from organizational change is high.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested by multiple regression analysis and structural equation model, using data collected from a big company with 14 subsidiaries undergoing organizational change.

Findings

Uncertainty of gaining legitimacy from organizational change not only results in resistance to change through the mediating variable – organizational readiness for change but also is an important influencing factor for enterprises’ choices of change strategy.

Research limitations/implications

Transformational change may alter original organizational legitimacy so that some enterprises prefer isomorphic change and decoupling change to maintain original organizational legitimacy, rather than institutional entrepreneurship to seek new organizational legitimacy.

Practical implications

To foster innovation and a new form of creation for firms, governments should provide enterprises with legitimacy in time by establishing a rapid legitimacy learning mechanism to supplement institutional voids, whereas enterprises should promote organizational readiness for change to reduce the negative influence of the uncertainty of gaining legitimacy.

Originality/value

This research reveals that the uncertainty of gaining legitimacy from organizational change is an antecedent of resistance to change and enriches antecedent categorical presupposition of resistance to change. These findings provide valuable insight for explaining why enterprises in economic entities with institutional voids such as China chose similar change strategies rather than institutional entrepreneurship.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article

Wim J.L. Elving

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for the study of communication during organisational change. Although there is an enduring…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for the study of communication during organisational change. Although there is an enduring interest in studying (internal) communication during organisational change, there is still little or no empirical research on the topic. Design/methodology/approach – In this conceptual paper a framework is presented on how to study communication during organisational change and how communication could prevent resistance to change. The framework leads to six propositions in which aspects of communication, such as information, feelings of belonging to a community, and feelings of uncertainty, have an influence on resistance to change, which will affect the effectiveness of the change effort. Findings – A distinction between the informative function of communication and communication as a means to create a community was made. In the suggested model communication has an effect not only on readiness for change, but also on uncertainty. Originality/value – This framework can be used by researchers and practitioners to study, guide, frame and model empirical research into this area in the future, and can be used to compare different change programs, within different organisations, to study the contribution of (internal) communication in the success or failure of the change.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Book part

Per Andersson

The aim of this chapter is to approach marketing organization from a research perspective, research that reflects contemporary practices of the time. This is done through…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to approach marketing organization from a research perspective, research that reflects contemporary practices of the time. This is done through a review of some of the central texts in the field. The chapter starts by drawing attention to two previous attempts to review and revisit the field, two influential and frequently cited researchers and texts: Achrol’s (1991) frequently cited article entitled “Evolution of the marketing organization: New forms for turbulent environments” and Homburg and colleagues’ (2000) review a decade later entitled “Fundamental changes in marketing organization: The movement toward a customer-focused organizational structure.”

The chapter then reviews the field around 2010, leading into the author’s own concluding reflections on how circumstances internal and external to organizations have affected the organizing of marketing. The chapter argues that while some ideas and changes after 2010 might be viewed as new, other changes are apparently old changes in new shapes. Attention is drawn to six areas of marketing organization research that have emerged and taken a central position in marketing organization research: (1) the adaptation of marketing practice and organization to various business trends, (2) market- and customer-oriented organizations, (3) shifts in marketing’s general role and influence within the firm, (4) marketing’s strategic role and connection to business management, (5) marketing’s interactions with other internal functions, and (6) marketing organization and the application of a wider spectrum of organization theories.

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Book part

Todd D. Jick and Kinthi D. M. Sturtevant

The world of management and technology has become accustomed to the notion of “2.0” advancements and transformative innovations. Is the field of Change Management…

Abstract

The world of management and technology has become accustomed to the notion of “2.0” advancements and transformative innovations. Is the field of Change Management/Organizational Development itself in this story? Not enough! We re-examine the field’s foundational beliefs, practices, focus, research directions, and value add. We conclude that there is strong evidence from the front line and from an IBM Case Study that the field must “reboot” – to rethink our methods and frameworks; the role and skills of change leadership for the future; change practitioner capabilities for the future; the metrics needed to evaluate progress; and the knowledge exchange between Academe and practitioners.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-436-1

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Book part

Jean M. Bartunek and Elise B. Jones

We explore how scholarly understandings of and the practice of organizational transformation have evolved since Bartunek and Louis’s (1988) Research in Organizational

Abstract

We explore how scholarly understandings of and the practice of organizational transformation have evolved since Bartunek and Louis’s (1988) Research in Organizational Change and Development chapter. While Bartunek and Louis hoped to see strategy scholarship and OD approaches to transformation inform each other, strategy literature has drifted away from transformation toward more continuous change. OD practice has focused on the implementation of its own versions of transformation through Large Group Interventions, Appreciative Inquiry, the new dialogic OD, and Theory U. Based on a discussion of Theory U, we call attention to the importance of individuals as an important source of new ideas in understanding and practicing large-scale change.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-436-1

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