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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Jatinder Kumar Jha and Manjari Singh

The purpose of the study is to explore the various kind of prevailing unethical practices at workplace along with identification of factors triggering such unethical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to explore the various kind of prevailing unethical practices at workplace along with identification of factors triggering such unethical practices. Growing incidences of indulgence of employees in unethical acts in various organisation and negative consequences associated with it for the organisation such as erosion of reputation because of advance digital media coverage, shareholder value and others made compulsive to study the root cause of unethical behaviour at the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This study extracts meaning from the experiences of top managers working in nine Indian organisations to understand the challenges faced by individuals at the workplace using the Gioia methodology. A total of 33 top management team (TMT) members were interviewed in detail to capture their experience in regard to various challenges that impose a threat to ethical conduct in the organisation.

Findings

The authors identified four categories of unethical behaviour, namely, pro-self, lack of autonomy, pro-organisation, systemic and negligence. Further, the authors have developed a taxonomy suggesting strategies to control unethical conduct at the workplace. Besides, the current study unravels the triggers behind different categories of unethical conduct, such as bottom-line mentality, rent-seeking behaviour of government officials, fluid ethical study culture and others.

Originality/value

Various types of unethical behaviour have been identified and frameworks to address such unethical practices are suggested in the paper. TMTs views have been captured to understand the root cause of unethical practices and strategies for addressing them have been discussed in the paper.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Bernard H.J. Verstegen

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a framework of management control that accommodates phenomena found in literature, like the importance of social factors for…

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4741

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a framework of management control that accommodates phenomena found in literature, like the importance of social factors for coordinating behavior, rule‐following behavior and the evolutionary nature of control. Phenomena that the dominant economic view, based on self‐interested actors and financial incentives, cannot easily absorb.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework characterizes control as the coordination of behavior in organizations. It is based on two‐stage rationality in which rule‐following behavior gives meaning to self‐interest, and in doing so, coordinates behavior.

Findings

Management control of two‐stage rational behavior involves managing the various elements of the framework in combination. The evolution of the coordinating rules in an organization will be partly autonomous and partly formed within the organization. Therefore, management control entails influencing the development path of the organization. Although it is concerned with the formation of controls in an organization, it is not exclusively concerned with the design of controls.

Practical implications

The framework provides broader opportunities for managing an organization than the theory based on simple rational choice.

Social implications

In this socio‐economic approach, management will not consider controlling the “economic man” to be its core activity; instead, management will be coordinating the behavior of authentic human beings.

Originality/value

These aspects of management remain undervalued in mainstream literature on management control. The non‐mainstream literature does pay attention to these aspects; however, they are seldom integrated in one theoretical structure that is based explicitly on a broad conception of human behavior. The socio‐economic view can offer valuable insight into management and organization.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Yeunjae Lee

The purpose of this paper is to examine different communicative behaviors employees engage in according to their position level and the impacts of relationship they…

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1056

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine different communicative behaviors employees engage in according to their position level and the impacts of relationship they perceive. By comparing the behaviors and perceptions of low-, middle-, and high-level employees, the study investigates when and why employees become active in communicative behaviors about an organizational issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative online survey was conducted with 412 full-time employees in medium- and large-sized corporations with more than 300 employees in the USA.

Findings

Results show that those who are the most likely to be active not only in expressing ideas (i.e. voice) to solve an issue but also in forwarding positive information about their organization (i.e. megaphoning) are high-level employees. The findings also reveal distinct impacts of two types of relationship – communal and exchange relationship – on behaviors of employees in different positions.

Research limitations/implications

The study extended the understanding of relational approach by exploring the consequences of two types of relationship in the context of employee relations, and filled the research gap on relationships and issue management studies in public relations from an internal perspective.

Practical implications

To encourage employees to engage actively in positive megaphoning and voice during issue periods and to minimize the threats by reducing employees’ negative megaphoning behavior, the study suggested different relationship-building strategies based on employees’ position levels.

Originality/value

The current work examined the distinct impacts of organization-employee relationships on employees’ internal and external communicative behaviors based on their position level within an organization, especially focusing on employees’ role as potential advocates or adversaries for an organization during periods of an organizational crisis.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Yeunjae Lee and Jeong-Nam Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of perceived authenticity of organizational behaviors and types of organization-employee relationship (i.e. communal…

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1265

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of perceived authenticity of organizational behaviors and types of organization-employee relationship (i.e. communal and exchange relationship) on intangible assets of organizations generated by employees’ communicative behaviors (ECBs) (e.g. megaphoning, scouting).

Design/methodology/approach

A web-based survey was conducted with full-time 528 employees working in medium- and large-sized companies in the USA.

Findings

Results showed that an organization’s authentic behaviors are positively related with employees’ perceived communal relationships, but not with exchange relationships. However, both communal and exchange relationships turned out to increase ECBs: positive megaphoning, negative megaphoning, and scouting. The existence of both communal and exchange relationships was more significant than having only communal relationships in terms of encouraging employees’ active communicative actions.

Research limitations/implications

By building links between employees’ communicative actions and its antecedents, perceived authenticity, types of relationship; this study contributed to the body of knowledge on exchange and communal relationship in the context of employee communication and extended the understanding of motivations of ECBs.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that employees’ communicative actions are highly facilitated by organizations’ authentic behavioral efforts and perceived relationship. To encourage employees’ information seeking and sharing behaviors, for organizational effectiveness, organizations should behave in authentic ways – be trustful, transparent, and consistent – and build both communal and exchange relationship.

Originality/value

This study first attempted to demonstrate the impacts of both communal and exchange relationships for organizations empirically in internal communication and relationship building practices.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Nak Hwan Choi and Yen‐Soon Kim

Past researches have not explored the roles of staff's hotel identification on customer‐related behaviors and the relationship between hotel identification inducing…

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1536

Abstract

Purpose

Past researches have not explored the roles of staff's hotel identification on customer‐related behaviors and the relationship between hotel identification inducing factors (trust in supervisor, job satisfaction, perceived external prestige) and hotel identification. The purpose of this paper is to examine the roles of staff's hotel identification as a mediator of the relationship between hotel identification inducing factors and customer‐related behaviors. Through reviewing the existing literature concerned, the authors propose a research model involving staff's trust in the supervisor, job satisfaction, perceived external prestige, hotel identification, organization citizenship behavior, and customer satisfaction behavior and test it.

Design/methodology/approach

Hotel samples were from the south‐west area of Korea. Questionnaires were given to 250 staff of the hotels and 224 were returned with no problems. The sample was used to purify the measures and test their convergent and discriminant validity. The final measurement model includes 24 items across six constructs. The authors conducted exploratory factor analysis to show that there are convergent validities of measurement items related to each construct, and explored correlations between the constructs and calculated average variance extracted to verify that there are discriminant validities between constructs. LISREL 8.30 was used to verify the hypotheses.

Findings

The results provided evidence that hotel identification plays important mediating roles between them. Identification with the hotel will be strengthened when job satisfaction and trust in the supervisor becomes strong. Trust in the supervisor plays a more important role in forming hotel identification than job satisfaction does. The role of organization citizenship behavior on the customer satisfaction behavior is also explored. Hotel identification affects organization citizenship behavior which in turn positively affects customer satisfaction behavior. But the results do not provide support for a central role of perceived external prestige.

Practical implications

The study gives information to hotel managers who want to encourage customer‐related behaviors that they should induce staff's identification with the hotel by improving the level of trust in the supervisor and job satisfaction.

Originality/value

Little past literature has explored the role of hotel identification as the substance of staff action. This study explored the influence of hotel identification on staff behavior that results in contributing to theoretical development and hotel management.

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Sumit Kumar Ghosh

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine both the direct effects and the interactive effects of job insecurity and job embeddedness on unethical…

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2485

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine both the direct effects and the interactive effects of job insecurity and job embeddedness on unethical pro-organizational behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected, using established scales, from employees of different Indian organizations. In all, 346 responses were collected. The data were analyzed using a stepwise multiple regression technique.

Findings

The results of the analysis reveal that both job insecurity and job embeddedness are positively linked to unethical pro-organizational behavior. Further, the relationship between job insecurity and unethical pro-organizational behavior is moderated by job embeddedness.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s results indicate that managers should be aware that employees who run the risk of losing their jobs might be inclined to perform pro-organizational behavior that could be unethical. Intrinsically, such acts could be detrimental to the organization’s long-term health and therefore managers should be vigilant and timely in discouraging this behavior.

Originality/value

Unethical pro-organizational behavior as a means used by employees to combat job insecurity has not previously been addressed by researchers. Thus, this study contributes to the literature through its empirical examination of the role of job insecurity and job embeddedness as factors influencing unethical pro-organizational behavior.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2011

Juan Jose Barrios and Mieke Meurs

Literature on nontraditional firms has focused on behavioral differences with for-profit firms. Less attention has been given to the variations in behavior among…

Abstract

Literature on nontraditional firms has focused on behavioral differences with for-profit firms. Less attention has been given to the variations in behavior among nontraditional firms. This chapter examines differences across three types of Uruguayan nonprofit health care organizations.

This chapter draws on a unique dataset of Uruguayan health care organizations during the period 1982–1990, as well as interviews with doctors working in the three types of nonprofits during spring 2010. We use a simple OLS regression to identify differences in average behavior, and differences in reaction to a regulatory change.

The chapter shows that structure of stake holding and governance significantly affect behavior, even where many behaviors are highly regulated.

These findings highlight the importance of specifying governance structure when predicting behavior of nontraditional firms. Empirical tests of behavioral differences between traditional and nontraditional firms will be more meaningful if the governance structure of nontraditional firms is common and specified. A limitation of our study is our inability to control for the timing of degeneration of producer cooperatives. This would be one element of governance structure to consider in future data collection.

These findings highlight the need to avoid drawing broad policy conclusions from the behavior of a specific subset of nontraditional firms.

This chapter highlights the importance of carefully specifying stakeholder and governance structure when predicting behavior of nontraditional firms. It is of interest to anyone using a sample of nontraditional firms to test general hypotheses about their behavior.

Details

Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory and Labor-Managed Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-760-5

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Yeunjae Lee

This study aims to examine the effects of internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the two types of communicative behaviors of employees, namely, scouting and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of internal corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the two types of communicative behaviors of employees, namely, scouting and advocative behaviors. Guided by social exchange theory, the study also explored the mediating role of social exchange relationships between an organization and its employees and employee engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted with 405 full-time employees in the USA across industry sectors.

Findings

Results show the following: internal CSR practices, including employment stability, working environment, skill development, workforce diversity and work–life balance, improve social exchange relationships and employee engagement; social exchange relationship mediates the positive association between internal CSR and engagement and advocative behavior; and employee engagement also mediates the association between internal CSR and the scouting and advocative behaviors of employees.

Originality/value

This study is among the first attempts to explore the effectiveness of organizations’ internal corporate social responsibility practices on employees’ informal communicative behaviors, information seeking and transmitting within and outside of their organization.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Alexander Serenko

This study aims to explore the existence of knowledge sabotage in the contemporary organization from the perspective of the target.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the existence of knowledge sabotage in the contemporary organization from the perspective of the target.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected and analyzed 172 critical incidents reported by 109 employees who were targets of knowledge sabotage in their organizations.

Findings

Over 50 per cent of employees experienced at least one knowledge sabotage incident. Knowledge sabotage is driven by three factors, namely, gratification, retaliation against other employees and one’s malevolent personality. Knowledge saboteurs are more likely to provide intangible than tangible knowledge. Knowledge sabotage results in extremely negative consequences for individuals, organizations and third parties. Organizations often indirectly facilitate knowledge sabotage among their employees. Both knowledge saboteurs and their targets believe in their innocence – saboteurs are certain that their action was a necessary response to targets’ inappropriate workplace behavior, whereas targets insist on their innocence and hold saboteurs solely responsible.

Practical implications

Organizations should recruit employees with compatible personalities and working styles, introduce inter-employee conflict prevention and resolution procedures, develop anti-knowledge sabotage policies, clearly articulate the individual and organizational consequences of knowledge sabotage and eliminate zero-sum game-based incentives and rewards.

Originality/value

This is the first study documenting knowledge sabotage from the target’s perspective.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Wenxue Lu, Yuxin Wei and Rui Wang

This paper aims to reveal the effects of an organisation’s bargaining power on its negotiating behaviours (including integrating, obliging, compromising, dominating and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reveal the effects of an organisation’s bargaining power on its negotiating behaviours (including integrating, obliging, compromising, dominating and avoiding) in the context of inter-organisational conflict in construction projects and investigate how organisational power distance orientation moderates the relationship between the organisation’s bargaining power and its negotiating behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a questionnaire survey among practitioners in the Chinese construction industry with the final sample consisting of 219 responses. A structural equation model was used to analyse the data and test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results reveal that an organisation’s bargaining power is positively associated with dominating and integrating behaviours but negatively associated with obliging and avoiding behaviours. Additionally, bargaining power is found to be negatively associated with compromising behaviour when the organisation has a high power distance orientation. Finally, a higher degree of power distance orientation strengthens the positive effect bargaining power has on dominating behaviour.

Practical implications

The findings can help practitioners to predict the negotiating behaviours of a counterpart according to its bargaining power and the power distance in its organisational culture. This can then enable practitioners to adjust their strategies accordingly and steer the negotiations towards a win–win outcome.

Originality/value

This study applies the approach-inhibition theory of power to inter-organisational negotiations and empirically tests the relationship between an organisation’s bargaining power and its negotiating behaviours in the context of construction projects. Additionally, this study reveals that organisational power distance orientation moderates this relationship.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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