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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Leslie A. Duram and Laura L. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of a student organic garden at a large public university, as an example of student initiatives that promote both…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of a student organic garden at a large public university, as an example of student initiatives that promote both university sustainability and student-focused sustainability education on campus.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted quantitative and qualitative analysis to document the evolution of the university’s Local Organic Gardening Initiative of Carbondale (LOGIC), which is the student-initiated and -operated organic garden at Southern Illinois University.

Findings

The student organic garden evolved in three stages, each of which had specific goals and accomplishments. Stage I (establishment): students in Geography courses took action to get the garden established; key components included funds from a sustainability scholarship and student-initiated camps Green Fund, dedicated undergraduate students, negotiating campus bureaucracy and motivating broad support. Stage II (evolution): a high tunnel was added to the original raised beds garden, a graduate assistant position was filled to manage the garden, additional funds were secured, a permaculture demonstration site was added, the volunteer base was established and LOGIC began being included in campus and community events. Stage III (future) challenges include: consistent leadership, long-term funding, guarantee of land availability, student graduation/turnover and increasing student involvement.

Originality/value

This paper provides a longitudinal perspective on the evolution of student-led sustainability efforts which require progressive, inclusive action from multiple stakeholders across campus and in the community. Several replicable practices include student leadership in sustainability initiatives, actions for promoting local food in the university structure and methods of negotiating complex institutional settings.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2014

Moira Beery, Rachel Adatia, Orsola Segantin and Chantal-Fleur Skaer

– The purpose of this paper is to respond to food insecurity and environmental sustainability through school food gardens in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to respond to food insecurity and environmental sustainability through school food gardens in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Permaculture is a method of organic agriculture where the garden design maintains a stable and productive ecosystem, mimicking natural processes and thereby creating a more natural and sustainable environment. Organic permaculture food gardens were established and integrated with the curriculum at two schools over the course of one year. A nutrition study of dietary intake and assessment of dietary diversity score was undertaken with a sample of 68 children.

Findings

Permaculture food gardens can contribute to children ' s physical, mental, and emotional health and can be a resource for teachers and learners. To achieve sustainability, practical and cultural challenges must be addressed.

Research limitations/implications

The project was implemented at only school sites, findings may not be applicable to all schools in all settings. This assessment was conducted after one year of implementation, impacts, and sustainability would be best assessed after three years. Conclusions are therefore based both on this case study and on the wider literature.

Practical implications

When implementing a school food garden there must be long-term support and mentoring for school staff.

Social implications

The value of a school food garden goes beyond the provision of nutrition and addressing food insecurity. Participation in gardening can increase students’ interactions with the natural world, and contribute to skills development, academic achievement, and well-being.

Originality/value

This paper informs discussion and practice related to school food gardens’ influence on holistic health and broader educational benefits. It is of relevance to health promotion and education practitioners, school garden developers, and funders.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Tonia Ruppenthal

Management literature often neglects the business model developed by a monastic institution, as it does not fit the usual categorizations of an enterprise. Nevertheless…

Abstract

Purpose

Management literature often neglects the business model developed by a monastic institution, as it does not fit the usual categorizations of an enterprise. Nevertheless, monastic institutions founded on Benedictine principles have proven to be economically viable and sustainable over centuries. This paper aims to examine, with the adoption of a single case study, the components of a Benedictine business model, their interrelationship and the role of sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study combines in-depth data collection from multiple sources such as field research, archival documents and publicly available information to examine the dynamic business operations of a Benedictine abbey.

Findings

The analysis suggests that the Rule of St Benedict and the Benedictine values, and a commitment to them, are important for the success of the Benedictine abbey concept and that the business model is both place-based and sustainable.

Research limitations/implications

A single case study has its limitations compared to the use of multiple examples. Business model concepts are not simply applicable to a monastic institution and vice versa; the Benedictine model is not easily transferable to conventional enterprises.

Practical implications

Generalizations from a single case study are limited; nevertheless this paper offers practical implications through the study of a monastic institution, showing place-based and sustainable business practices from which management scholars can make assumptions.

Originality/value

This paper describes and analyses the inception, development and stabilization of a sustainable place-based business model of a Benedictine abbey according to three stages over a period of 35 years while evaluating the sustainable business model from its inception.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Giovanni Maria Mazzanti, Giulio Ecchia and Tamami Komatsu

The third sector is a producer of trust and positive social interactions, while the mafias destroy trust and social norms. Confiscation of assets and reusing confiscated…

Abstract

Purpose

The third sector is a producer of trust and positive social interactions, while the mafias destroy trust and social norms. Confiscation of assets and reusing confiscated assets are important tools from an economic and symbolic point of view for contrasting the mafias and promoting a sustainable and fair economy. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of the third sector for reusing confiscated assets.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a theoretical analysis of why a third sector role is utilized for reusing confiscated assets, thus focusing on the economic, social and cultural dimensions. Italian legislation and data are presented for showing the relevant and innovative role of the third sector for reusing confiscated assets. A case study of the city of Forlì, based in Northern Italy, is presented and is of particular interest because it is a part of Italy that does not have a historical presence of the mafias. The University of Bologna is now a partner of the project through the Observatory of Legality. Five hectares of confiscated, urban land have been given to two social cooperatives for organic agriculture and social gardening, which are managed by disadvantaged people working in the cooperatives.

Findings

The case study offers useful implications for other national and international situations. The results support that the third sector can be an effective partner in managing and restoring the goods to their community.

Research limitations/implications

A suggested focus on a European framework toward a more integrated approach for reusing confiscated assets.

Practical implications

An opportunity for policy decisions to be made toward a stronger approach for reusing confiscated assets via the third sector and civil society actors, starting from positive cases, such as the Forlì case study.

Social implications

Possibility of a stronger civic engagement for reusing confiscated assets previously owned by mafias.

Originality/value

Scaling up from a pioneering activity to a large-scale network of social enterprises and partnerships could make the difference.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

K.C. Fraser

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Nick Martin

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

A.C.I.D. Karunarathne, J.P.R.C. Ranasinghe, U.G.O. Sammani and K.J.T. Perera

The tourism industry has been extensively affected by numerous disasters throughout its history including 30 decades of ethnic war, the tsunami disaster in 2004 and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The tourism industry has been extensively affected by numerous disasters throughout its history including 30 decades of ethnic war, the tsunami disaster in 2004 and the Easter Sunday attack in 2019 substantially impacted the resources and capacities of the tourism industry in Sri Lanka. This study aims to explore the impact of COVID-19 on Sri Lanka as a tourism destination and the tourism industry as a resilient sector of the economy.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study was conducted from July 2020 to September 2020 focusing on the perspectives of multi-level stakeholders in the tourism and hospitality industry in three distinct areas of Sri Lanka, namely, the coastal area, hill country and cultural triangle. The data were collected from 15 stakeholders via semistructured interviews. Convenience sampling method was used to choose the sample and thematic analysis was occupied to meet the study objectives.

Findings

This study will help to reframe the resources and capacities of the country as an emerging destination identifying the diverse credentials from the perspective of different stakeholders to embed the essential resilience after the pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

The prevailing lockdown situation and travel restrictions within the country was a huge challenge during the data collection process. Further to that, the respondents were reluctant to meet outsiders owing to the health threat, and hence some important stakeholders were missing from the study.

Originality/value

This study proposes effective measures to build up a robust destination, necessary strategic planning for policymakers and provisions for stakeholders in the industry to address the health and safety of travelers in the case of future potential health epidemics.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2018

Young Hoon Kim, Daniel L. Spears, Elecer E. Vargas-Ortega and Tae-Hee Kim

This paper aims to review the current joint master’s program between two international institutions in the USA and Costa Rica; to identify students’ perceptions and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the current joint master’s program between two international institutions in the USA and Costa Rica; to identify students’ perceptions and experiences with the sustainability house (SH); and to apply these experiences in an effort to improve the practical learning environment for future students.

Design/methodology/approach

In an effort to understand student outcomes provided by the SH, an in-depth literature review on practical learning environments and interview methods were applied. The following open-ended questions were asked in an effort to gather and consolidate student experiences with the SH. What are your experiences in/with SH? Please tell us briefly about your experiences. The language has been adjusted and interviewers answered questions and made clarifications if asked to. Master’s in international sustainable tourism (MIST) program students were selected for this study. Participants’ responses were recorded using the computer-assisted personal interviewing technique.

Findings

The most important characteristic students recognized about the SH is that it “provided us a safe place to fail”. One student described SH as “[…] a safe space where students can gain experiences of learning new processes firsthand without external pressures (e.g., on-the-job training, eventuation, and financial analysis)”. The safety attribute of the SH environment is considered as a comfortable place to learn from other classmates or visitors (mostly volunteers and interns). It is a “real” hospitality and tourism business-learning center, which is a great benefit to the students not only because of its environment but also because of the diversity among student’s educational and professional backgrounds.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitations of this study need to be addressed. The number of interviews was very limited with one year data which could affect the generalizability of this study. In addition, it was not clearly explained to the student what rubrics and standardized metrics were used during interview process; after interview, students were asked to provide a better way to improve the research outcomes. For further studies, it is strongly recommended to provide the direction to make sure it applies to the conditions that are prevalent in the existing site to be examined.

Practical implications

Both strategies that link the SH to this MIST program have significant merit. Students implementing best practices in the courses have clearly identified the challenges of implementation, but all agree that there is tremendous value in the experiences they have received during their studies. Furthermore, using the SH as an engagement tool has motivated students to consciously interactive and collaborative in a more proactive manner.

Originality/value

This unique experience and operational competency at the SH provides participants with an in-depth understanding of the context and challenges of sustainability but needs to be detailed and promoted more in the future. The SH is facilitating a learning environment among not only students but also faculty and staff. The results clearly indicated that the SH has influenced sustainable behaviors by promoting interactive engagement.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Marcia Eugenio-Gozalbo, Guadalupe Ramos-Truchero and Rafael Suárez-López

Gardens are being used at all educational stages, because they provide with a real-world context for active and experiential learning. In Spain, there exists a movement in…

Abstract

Purpose

Gardens are being used at all educational stages, because they provide with a real-world context for active and experiential learning. In Spain, there exists a movement in favor of their incorporation to higher education for a variety of purposes but prevalently as an innovative resource to teach sciences to pre-service teachers. The purpose of this study is assessing the impacts of such pedagogical practice on university students’ learning and behavioral changes in the areas of environmental and food citizenship, two key dimensions of contemporary citizenship that are essential to achieve sustainable societies.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected by means of an electronic, open-ended question survey completed by 170 students from 6 different universities where gardens are used. Answers were qualitatively analyzed using MAXQDA software to develop a system of content categories and subcategories in relation to reported learning and behavioral changes.

Findings

Widespread among universities was learning on organic agriculture practices, greater appreciation of agricultural labor, greater willingness to cultivate, higher awareness of environmental impacts of agriculture, improved behaviors regarding waste separation and enhanced fruit and vegetable consumption.

Originality/value

This work delves into how university gardens act as a vehicle through which students integrate knowledge and reflect on their environmental, food and consumption behaviors. Thus, it supports on evidences, the use of gardens at higher education to nurture two dimensions of contemporary citizenship essential to achieve sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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