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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Ana Manzano and Ray Pawson

Organ donation and transplantation services represent a microcosm of modern healthcare organisations. They are complex adaptive systems. They face perpetual problems of…

Abstract

Purpose

Organ donation and transplantation services represent a microcosm of modern healthcare organisations. They are complex adaptive systems. They face perpetual problems of matching supply and demand. They operate under fierce time and resource constraints. And yet they have received relatively little attention from a systems perspective. The purpose of this paper is to consider some of the fundamental issues in evaluating, improving and policy reform in such complex systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper advocates an approach based on programme theory evaluation.

Findings

The paper explains how the death to donation to transplantation process depends on the accumulation of series of embedded, institutional sub-processes. Evaluators need to be concerned with this whole system rather than with its discrete parts or sectors. Policy makers may expect disappointment if they seek to improve donation rates by applying nudges or administrative reforms at a single point in the implementation chain.

Originality/value

These services represent concentrated, perfect storms of complexity and the paper offers guidance to practitioners with bio-medical backgrounds on how such services might be evaluated and improved. For the methodological audience the paper caters for the burgeoning interest in programme theory evaluation while illustrating the design phase of this research strategy.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Jandir Pauli, Kenny Basso and Juliane Ruffatto

Recent technological developments in healthcare have enabled an increased number of organ transplantation surgeries. At the same time, there is an increase in the number…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent technological developments in healthcare have enabled an increased number of organ transplantation surgeries. At the same time, there is an increase in the number of people awaiting organ transplant, coupled with the difficulty in donation. To bridge this gap, this study aims to propose to evaluate the effect of three types of beliefs (clinical beliefs, financial incentive beliefs and beliefs on the social benefits of altruism and solidarity) on the intention to donate organs. Moreover, this paper uses the attitudes in relation to donation to explain the effect of these beliefs on the intention to donate organs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted using a survey of 422 Brazilian participants and a mediation analysis to test the mediation hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that the effect of three types of beliefs (clinical, economic order and social solidarity) influence the intention to donate organs indirectly through the formation of attitudes concerning organ donation.

Research limitations/implications

This article contributes to the understanding of the formation of organ donation intentions and the role of different types of beliefs in the formation of such intentions.

Originality/value

The findings extend the discussions regarding the role of beliefs in the formation of attitudes and intentions of organ donation and have significant value in creating public policies that further promote organ donation.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2016

Frederick Kroon

In this chapter I consider the need for consent in two cases of posthumous donation of parts of one’s body: organ donation and the donation of sperm to allow one’s partner…

Abstract

In this chapter I consider the need for consent in two cases of posthumous donation of parts of one’s body: organ donation and the donation of sperm to allow one’s partner to conceive a child after one’s death. What kind of consent is appropriate in these cases and why? In both cases, jurisdictions tend to prefer explicit consent, although many countries now adopt presumed consent (opt-out) in the case of organ donation, and there has been a recent plea for presumed consent in the case of sperm donation as well. In this chapter I first argue that arguments in favour of presumed consent are inadequate as they stand, and then describe another way of understanding opt-out schemes, one that focuses on different models of what is at stake and on the ethical requirements incurred on such models.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Applied and Professional Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-443-3

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Kirstin Goldring

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Elaine L. Ritch and Julie McColl

By the end of this chapter, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:How sustainability messages have diffused into mainstream discourse?The role of…

Abstract

By the end of this chapter, you should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

How sustainability messages have diffused into mainstream discourse?

The role of behavioural economics, specifically nudge theory, in encouraging sustainable behaviours.

The visual elements in marketing that support nudge theory.

How businesses are aligning with consumer concern for sustainability to illustrate their ‘wokeness’ to social issues.

Details

New Perspectives on Critical Marketing and Consumer Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-554-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Nikhil Dhakate and Rohit Joshi

Environmental sustainability in health care is an important issue due to the limited available healthcare resources and increase in demand. For instance, organ recycling…

Abstract

Purpose

Environmental sustainability in health care is an important issue due to the limited available healthcare resources and increase in demand. For instance, organ recycling and transplantation may reduce the increasing pressure on healthcare resources. The purpose of this paper is to set out to identify and interrelate the inhibitors that significantly influence the recycling of human organs and their implications to the environment in developing economies such as India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses Delphi–ISM–regression, a three-step method, to investigate the possible reasons for the poor supply chain efficiency of organ recycling and to explore the consequence of excessive use of healthcare resources on the environment. The Delphi technique facilitates the identification, synthesis, and prioritization of the inhibitors. Then, using focused group discussion, the interpretive structure modeling (ISM) presents the interaction among the inhibitors into a hierarchy. Further, on the basis of 257 valid responses received on the structured survey instrument, the regression model examines the influence of identified constructs on one of the identified root causes.

Findings

The ISM presents the hierarchy-based model that depicts high driving power and low dependence inhibitors leading to reduced organ recycling rate. “Negative Intentions of family members” toward organ donation t “Willingness to discuss with family” and “Perceived Behavioral Control” emerged as the significant factors influencing organ recycling rate, which adversely impact the environment sustainability.

Originality/value

The patients on the organ waiting list put pressure on the availability of medical resources and, ultimately, on the environment through the consumption of different drugs and disposable of medical wastes. The study suggests policymakers and hospitals improve on the existing policies for an efficient supply chain of human organ recycling. The Indian situation echoes the situation in most of the emerging economies, and similar solutions can apply there too.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Alper Altinanahtar, John R. Crooker and Jamie B. Kruse

This paper aims to estimate a supply response to monetary incentives to donate organs using a survey based on Adams, Barnett and Kaserman.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to estimate a supply response to monetary incentives to donate organs using a survey based on Adams, Barnett and Kaserman.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses bootstrap techniques to estimate the characteristics of individuals and their willingness to accept monetary compensation for an organ donation commitment. It uses the estimates to fuel a simulation that examines the relationship between a market‐clearing price and the usability rate. The usability rate is the proportion of deaths that result in tissues that are viable for transplant.

Findings

By analyzing the relationship between usability rate and market‐clearing price, the paper identifies three important ranges. When the usability rate is about 5 percent, a donation‐only system (zero price) should clear the market. At a usability rate between 2 and 5 percent, modest monetary incentives can attract a supply response that will clear the market. When the usability rate is less than 2 percent, supply becomes sufficiently inelastic so that even large monetary incentives will not solve the shortage problem.

Practical implications

If the market mechanism were capable of yielding a greater number of organs for transplantation than the current system, then its adoption would save numerous lives and significantly reduce the cost of treating a variety of serious diseases. Also, it is useful in a benefit‐cost analysis framework designed to measure the social value of refinements in the coordination system.

Originality/value

By relating the market‐clearing price of organs to their usability rates, this paper draws attention on the importance of interdisciplinary studies.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

M. Mostafa

This study uses intelligent modeling techniques with the purpose of examining the effect of various demographic, cognitive and psychographic factors on organ donation in Egypt.

Abstract

Purpose

This study uses intelligent modeling techniques with the purpose of examining the effect of various demographic, cognitive and psychographic factors on organ donation in Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

Two artificial neural network models (multi‐layer perceptron neural network and probabilistic neural network) are compared to two standard statistical methods (linear discriminant analysis and logistic regression). The variable sets considered are sex, age, educational level, religion, altruistic values, perceived benefits/risks of organ donation, organ donation knowledge, attitudes toward organ donation, and intention to donate organs.

Findings

The results show that artificial neural networks outperform traditional statistical techniques in profiling potential organ donors due to their robustness and flexibility of modeling algorithms.

Originality/value

The paper shows how it is possible to identify various dimensions of organ donation behavior by uncovering patterns in the dataset, and also shows the classification abilities of two neural network techniques.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2020

Amani Alsalem, Park Thaichon and Scott Weaven

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of several social-cognitive models that have been lately applied in public health and donation contexts. The current review…

Abstract

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of several social-cognitive models that have been lately applied in public health and donation contexts. The current review included the elaboration likelihood model (ELM), the prototype willingness model (PWM), and the organ donation model (ODM). This review also details and discusses the main strengths and limitations of these models. Importantly, this review helps to identify the gap of the current social marketing and health-care literature. In particular, this chapter provides a solid theoretical foundation and has initiated further pathways for future researchers who are interested in the fields of public health and social change literature, organ donation context, as well as social-cognitive decision-making models. The significance of this review is defined by advancing public health practitioners, social marketing communicators, and educationalists, evidencing how conceptual models can inform and guide the research.

Details

A Guide to Planning and Managing Open Innovative Ecosystems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-409-6

Keywords

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