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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Khee Giap Tan, Hui Yin Chuah and Nguyen Trieu Duong Luu

Malaysia and Singapore had parted more than five decades ago. Much of the existing literature concerned about the bilateral ties between two economies focusing on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Malaysia and Singapore had parted more than five decades ago. Much of the existing literature concerned about the bilateral ties between two economies focusing on the political economy perspective. This paper aims to provide insights on the economic development and prospects of Malaysia and Singapore at the national level. In addition, this paper also makes a pioneering attempt at conducting a comprehensive comparative analysis between Malaysia and Singapore at the city level.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers a case study of Malaysia and Singapore by assessing their national economic competitiveness, urban standards of living and quality of life. The paper leverages on a series of indices such as the competitiveness index for ASEAN-10, the cost of living, wages and purchasing power of ordinary residents, as well as the liveable cities index to perform the analysis.

Findings

In terms of national competitiveness, the analysis shows that Singapore and Malaysia have been leading the ASEAN region from 2000 onwards, being the top- and second-ranked, respectively. Malaysia still lags Singapore in several aspects such as attractiveness to foreign investors and standard of living, education and social stability despite insignificant differences in the ranking. City-level analysis shows that the cost of living in Singapore is almost double of that in Kuala Lumpur, although living in Singapore is more affordable owing to the higher wage rate received by the ordinary citizens.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature in several ways. First, this paper assesses economic development in Singapore and Malaysia instead of focusing on cross-straits relations. Second, the study reflects the view that the improvement of standards of living and quality of life for ordinary residents is paramount to economic development. The competitiveness index and city-level benchmarks used in the paper reflect the standards of living and the quality-of-life dimensions. Third, the focus on city-level analysis in addition to conventional national-level analysis helps to provide policymakers with practical policy implications against the backdrop of rapid urbanisation.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Ken Simons

The central argument of this paper is that supported living — enabling people with learning disabilities to live in their own homes, with appropriate support — has a…

Abstract

The central argument of this paper is that supported living — enabling people with learning disabilities to live in their own homes, with appropriate support — has a potential strategic role in addressing some of the current shortcomings in community‐based residential services. These shortcomings are described, along with the possible contribution of an approach in which housing and support are separated. Finally some of the current concerns about supported living are briefly addressed.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2009

Martin Ayres and Ashok Roy

This paper reports on the development and service delivery of the Supported Living Outreach Team for people with severe psychiatric, behavioural and forensic needs in a…

Abstract

This paper reports on the development and service delivery of the Supported Living Outreach Team for people with severe psychiatric, behavioural and forensic needs in a city with a population of 1.1 million. The authors discuss the reasons why the team was formed, and the partnerships it has formed with local housing and care providers in order to enable people with very complex needs to lead ordinary lives in their local communities. The pathway of team involvement is described, starting with the initial assessment, setting up and monitoring of new schemes, through to discharge. Also described are the measures the team uses to monitor its effectiveness, the benefits the team has brought to the service, and the hurdles and barriers it has had to overcome on its journey to support people with complex needs to live safely in their local communities.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Christopher Goodey

This paper aims to look forward to the next generation of policymaking on learning disability and recommends a unitary strategy covering all phases of life including childhood.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to look forward to the next generation of policymaking on learning disability and recommends a unitary strategy covering all phases of life including childhood.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the author addresses the policy gap between inclusion in ordinary (“mainstream”) schools and inclusion in ordinary adult life. The author asks why what has been accepted, at least in principle, for the adult two-thirds of the learning disabled population is still contested for the other, younger third. In the following sections, the author summarises the present discrepancy, compares the rights of children in general with those of people with learning disabilities and outlines the rationale for a 0-99 years focus in research and practice on learning disability, and for future government strategy to establish a 0-99 policy.

Findings

It is in the broad context of a unitary 0-99 years approach that policymaking must in future be addressed. The education of children is key to the success of their adult lives, and makes the policy of educating them together in ordinary schools (i.e. giving them from the start the “ordinary lives” that are the main goal of adult policy) an imperative.

Originality/value

The need to consider children’s rights in a general sense has not previously been applied to the field of policymaking for adults with learning disabilities.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 1998

Ken Simons

THE INTENTIONS OF THE registration system for registered care homes were honourable, but in practice their application to services has frustrated attempts to give people…

Abstract

THE INTENTIONS OF THE registration system for registered care homes were honourable, but in practice their application to services has frustrated attempts to give people the chance of an ordinary life. This institutional framework is inconsistently used and needs reform.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Brian Nolan and Stefan Thewissen

This paper places what has happened to income inequality in rich countries over recent decades alongside trends in median and low incomes in real terms, taken as…

Abstract

This paper places what has happened to income inequality in rich countries over recent decades alongside trends in median and low incomes in real terms, taken as incomplete but valuable indicators of the evolution of living standards for “ordinary working families” and the poor. The findings demonstrate first just how varied country experiences have been, with some much more successful than others in generating rising real incomes around the middle and toward the bottom of the distribution. This variation is seen to be only modestly related to the extent to which income inequality rose, which itself is more varied across the rich countries than is often appreciated. The extent to which economic growth is transmitted to the middle and lower parts of the distribution is seen to depend on a range of factors of which inequality is only one. Sources of real income growth around the middle have also varied across countries, though transfers are consistently key toward the bottom. The diversity of rich country experiences should serve as an important corrective to a now-common “grand narrative” about inequality and stagnation based on the experience of the USA.

Details

Inequality, Redistribution and Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-040-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Theresa Joyce and Wendy Close

It is essential that the quality of residential services is monitored, both to identify service deterioration and to improve service quality. Current models of community…

Abstract

It is essential that the quality of residential services is monitored, both to identify service deterioration and to improve service quality. Current models of community services have produced fragmentation among service providers, and a separation of purchasers and providers. These different groups need to work together to share a vision and a model of good practice. Participation in the auditing of each other's services, and a focus from commissioners on being supportive rather than punitive, assist in this. Audit also enables a view of the strategic challenges which face services to be developed. These challenges include ensuring that staff are skilled in supporting clients to live as ordinary a life as possible, as well as meeting any additional complex needs they may have.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Jo Whaley, Di Domenico and Jane Alltimes

This purpose of this paper is to examine the role of engagement and empowerment in “Transforming Care”, for people with a learning disability. The aim is to shift the…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to examine the role of engagement and empowerment in “Transforming Care”, for people with a learning disability. The aim is to shift the balance of power so that people are able to live ordinary lives in the community, in the home they choose, close to people they love. It shares ideas to support people to take control over their own lives and to influence the system, so that it works with people, rather than “doing to” people.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines barriers and enablers to people having their rights as citizens. So that people have as much choice and control as they are comfortable with to live an ordinary life (bearing in mind any legal restrictions). The paper includes people’s involvement in system/service redesign. It critiques traditional views of looking at language, participation and power. The authors have used the language throughout which people have told us they prefer as a descriptor.

Findings

The authors present a framework for looking at the power of, and around, people with a learning disability who have mental health issues or have displayed behaviour that can challenge services.

Originality/value

This paper offers advice on how to address power imbalances at individual level and at organisational/system level. It looks at the language we use, the information we share and how we work with experts by experience to ensure we can transform care and support and enable people to live ordinary lives as citizens.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Janet Solomons

This article analyses the experience of the London Borough of Barnet's participation in a national housing pilot project which sought to enable local authorities to…

Abstract

This article analyses the experience of the London Borough of Barnet's participation in a national housing pilot project which sought to enable local authorities to increase the range of housing opportunities for people with learning disabilities. It also considers the potential impact of the project on service delivery.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2017

David Cooperrider, David Cooperrider and Suresh Srivastva

It’s been thirty years since the original articulation of “Appreciative Inquiry in Organizational Life” was written in collaboration with my remarkable mentor Suresh…

Abstract

It’s been thirty years since the original articulation of “Appreciative Inquiry in Organizational Life” was written in collaboration with my remarkable mentor Suresh Srivastva (Cooperrider & Srivastva, 1987). That article – first published in Research in Organization Development and Change – generated more experimentation in the field, more academic excitement, and more innovation than anything we had ever written. As the passage of time has enabled me to look more closely at what was written, I feel both a deep satisfaction with the seed vision and scholarly logic offered for Appreciative Inquiry, as well as well as the enormous impact and continuing reverberation. Following the tradition of authors such as Carl Rogers who have re-issued their favorite works but have also added brief reflections on key points of emphasis, clarification, or editorial commentary I am presenting the article by David Cooperrider (myself) and the late Suresh Srivastva in its entirety, but also with new horizon insights. In particular I write with excitement and anticipation of a new OD – what my colleagues and I are calling the next “IPOD” that is, innovation-inspired positive OD that brings AI’s gift of new eyes together in common cause with several other movements in the human sciences: the strengths revolution in management; the positive pscyhology and positive organizational scholarship movements; the design thinking explosion; and the biomimicry field which is all about an appreciative eye toward billions of years of nature’s wisdom and innovation inspired by life.

This article presents a conceptual refigurationy of action-research based on a “sociorationalist” view of science. The position that is developed can be summarized as follows: For action-research to reach its potential as a vehicle for social innovation it needs to begin advancing theoretical knowledge of consequence; that good theory may be one of the best means human beings have for affecting change in a postindustrial world; that the discipline’s steadfast commitment to a problem solving view of the world acts as a primary constraint on its imagination and contribution to knowledge; that appreciative inquiry represents a viable complement to conventional forms of action-research; and finally, that through our assumptions and choice of method we largely create the world we later discover.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-436-1

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