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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Jintana Sarayuthpitak, Sarinya Rodpipat, Sanong Ekgasit and Dean M. Ravizza

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of oral hygiene promoting program (OHPP) using a smartphone endomicroscope among students in elementary schools…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of oral hygiene promoting program (OHPP) using a smartphone endomicroscope among students in elementary schools in Bangkok, Thailand, to enable their oral hygiene maintenance and to compare oral health outcomes in the intervention program between the experimental and control groups.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quasi-experimental research study consisting of two groups, a pretest, a posttest and a follow-up design. The student sample consisted of 59 fifth graders who matched the study criteria on medium and low levels of teeth brushing skills. There were 29 experimental group participants who completed the six-week OHPP using a smartphone endomicroscope. Another 30 participants formed the control group involved in the ordinary oral health education program. The comparison data for oral health behaviors (knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP)) and oral hygiene were statistically analyzed by using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).

Findings

Results indicated that the experimental group exhibited higher oral health behaviors regarding KAPs and oral hygiene related to teeth cleanliness and gum health than the control group in the postexperimental and follow-up phases. However, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with regard to tongue cleanliness.

Originality/value

The students maintain their own oral hygiene due to a provision of activities related to KAP concerns. The instrument helped the students to find tooth decay and dental plaque associated with teeth cleanliness after brushing their teeth.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Kjersti Berge Evensen, Vibeke Hervik Bull and Linda Ness

Prisoners have poorer oral health than the general population. Good oral health is essential for both social and physical well-being. For prisoners, poor oral health is…

Abstract

Purpose

Prisoners have poorer oral health than the general population. Good oral health is essential for both social and physical well-being. For prisoners, poor oral health is also related to drug use after release, whereas good oral health is related to successful reintegration into society. The purpose of this study was twofold: to examine the effect of an intervention based on motivational interviewing (MI) on prisoners’ oral health-related behavior and to assess if the intervention is a good fit for this population.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 16 prisoners in a Norwegian prison were offered a brief MI-based intervention focusing on changing their oral health-related behavior. An oral examination was also performed and the prisoners received a small package containing oral hygiene aids. Two weeks later, a second oral examination and a semi-structured interview were conducted to explore the effect of the intervention and examine the prisoners’ responses to the intervention. Qualitative data analyzes were guided by thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that the intervention had positive effects on both the prisoners’ motivation to use oral health-related behavior and their performance of oral health-related behavior. The findings also indicate that the intervention was well adapted to the target population.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that explore the effect of an intervention in improving prisoners’ oral health and bridges a knowledge gap in the literature. The findings may increase the understanding of how dental services should be organized and offered to provide dental health care to this vulnerable group.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

P. Pugo Gunsam and S. Banka

This paper seeks to assess the oral health status and behaviour of a sample of the Mauritian population visiting private dental clinics.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to assess the oral health status and behaviour of a sample of the Mauritian population visiting private dental clinics.

Design/methodology/approach

Oral health status was determined using the World Health Organization (Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index indicating the prevalence of caries, and factors associated with oral health behaviour were investigated. Cross‐sectional data on oral health behaviour and demographic characteristics were collected through a structured 22‐item self‐designed survey questionnaire administered to a randomly selected sample of 250 Mauritians visiting private dental clinics. The data were statistically analysed to examine associations between oral health variables.

Findings

Analyses revealed significant correlations between DMFT scores, age and socioeconomic status. Over 80 per cent of the children below the age of 11 had DMFT scores higher than the acceptable WHO value of 3, and most adults older than 45 years had DMFT scores higher than 7. A large majority (85 per cent) reported using both fluoride toothpaste and tongue scrapers, but none reported using dental floss. Those who brushed teeth only once daily had high DMFT scores. Among males, smokers had significantly higher mean DMFT than non‐smokers. Females demonstrated better rates of good oral health behaviour than males. Respondents from higher socioeconomic classes were between three to five times more likely to visit dental clinics than those from lower classes.

Practical implications

This study reveals the need for intervention programmes to raise awareness of good oral health practices among the Mauritian people.

Originality/value

The results identified the high risk groups and highlighted the need for dental education, taking into consideration socioeconomic status and sociodemographics in order to enable Mauritians to become oralhygiene‐conscious and active partners for the management of oral health and prevention of systemic diseases.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Vikram Bansal, G.M. Sogi, K.L. Veeresha, Adarsh Kumar and Shelly Bansal

This paper aims to explore prisoner dental health in Haryana, India.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore prisoner dental health in Haryana, India.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors assessed the prevalence of dental caries and the treatment needs of prisoners in all 19 prisons in Haryana. The results were compared with the prison populations of other countries and the general population of Haryana.

Findings

The mean age of 1,393 subjects examined was 35.26±12.29 years. A large number of the subjects reported to be in need of dental treatment. The number of decayed teeth was found to be similar to the general population of Haryana but the number of filled teeth was quite low. The number of teeth missing and the need for tooth extraction was high.

Social implications

Long‐standing prisoner dental problems indicated a need for dental treatment in prisons.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind covering all 19 prisons in Haryana, India. The results indicate that the government needs to further consider and address the oral health needs of prisoners.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Susan Patterson and Pauline Ford

The purpose of this paper is to inform education of non-mental health professionals who provide care to people with severe mental illness; to describe dentistry students…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inform education of non-mental health professionals who provide care to people with severe mental illness; to describe dentistry students’ knowledge and views about mental illness, including willingness to engage in various social situations with a person hospitalised for mental illness; and to assess and understand the impact of a targeted lecture on views and attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employed mixed methods to examine dental students’ knowledge and views about mental disorder before and after a seminar covering mental disorder, disadvantage and oral health. Findings from a bespoke questionnaire administered to third-year dental students were triangulated with qualitative data gathered in interviews with a subsample.

Findings

Students understood mental disorder broadly, employing diverse causal models. Although knowledge was typically grounded in media stereotypes, attitudes were benevolent and most students reported willingness to provide dental care to affected individuals. The seminar, especially the consumer delivered section, was valued and associated with increased appreciation of the impact of mental disorder on oral health and need for assertive action to promote access to care. However, students reported being reluctant to disclose their own mental health problems for fear of being considered a professional or personal failure. A minority knew how to seek support if a friend talked of suicide.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the need for further investigation of the knowledge and attitudes of dentistry students pertinent to provision of care to people with mental illness and to examine the links between attitudes and practice. The paper also provides a useful foundation for development of brief educational interventions, particularly the value in integrating the service user perspective, and their evaluation. Research should also examine the impact of mental health education on practice.

Practical implications

A single inexpensive educational session, such as the one the paper developed may support reconsideration of often unconscious views of mental illness which might affect practice.

Social implications

If people with mental illness are to receive equitable access to health care, non-mental health professionals should be supported to develop knowledge and attitudes which are conducive to inclusive treatment. An education session such as this could be helpful.

Originality/value

There is scant literature examining attitudes of dentistry students and no reports of mental health-specific education with this population.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Abiola Adeniyi, Leeann Donnelly, Patricia Janssen, Cecilia Jevitt, Michael Siarkowski and Mario Brondani

Integrating preventive oral care into prenatal care is suggested as a strategy for reducing the burden of oral diseases among pregnant women and their offspring. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrating preventive oral care into prenatal care is suggested as a strategy for reducing the burden of oral diseases among pregnant women and their offspring. This scoping review sought to synthesize available information and identify knowledge gaps on integrating oral health into prenatal care.

Design/methodology/approach

The scoping review was conducted based on the Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review framework using the following databases: CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, ProQuest Dissertation and theses Global, Psychinfo and Web of Science®. No search limits were used. Content analysis of the included articles was performed to identify conceptual frameworks, types of integration used, study designs, study objectives and outcomes.

Findings

Overall, 2,861 references were obtained from the databases search; and based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria 35 references were included in the final analysis. Of these 35 references, one document presented a conceptual model, six documents reviewed guidelines for integrating oral health in prenatal care, two were policy documents aimed at interprofessional collaboration for oral health during pregnancy, eight documents described programs focused on providing oral care during pregnancy, five of the references were literature reviews and the remaining 13 evaluated the impact of integration. Linkages between healthcare professionals were the most common type of integration used.

Research limitations/implications

Despite advances in understanding integrated care concepts for healthcare delivery, there is little evidence available on the impact of the various types of, and strategies for, integrating oral health into prenatal care. Future research to bridge the identified gaps is recommended.

Originality/value

The originality of this study is to provide evidence on integrated oral healthcare during pregnancy.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Morag MacDonald, Fatemeh Rabiee and Caren Weilandt

The purpose of this paper is to assess the health promotion needs of vulnerable young prisoners and the existing health promotion activities in custodial settings in seven…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the health promotion needs of vulnerable young prisoners and the existing health promotion activities in custodial settings in seven European Union (EU) Member States.

Design/methodology/approach

The research comprised two components: the first involved identifying existing health promotion practices. The second involved mapping out young offenders’ health promotion needs by carrying out a needs assessment. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were adopted. The quantitative element comprised surveys among young prisoners and prison staff and focused on the availability and perceived importance of health promotion activities in prison. The qualitative element comprised focus groups with young offenders and individual interviews with prison staff, field experts and NGO members.

Findings

The findings from the research have identified a number of similar, but also some diverse areas of unmet need for health promotion activities in prison settings across these diverse seven EU countries. There is no consistency of approach within and between countries regarding health promotion policy, guidance, resources and programmes for young prisoners. In order to improve the health of young prisoners and to establish and increase sustainability of existing health promotion programmes, there is a need for the establishment of National and EU standards.

Originality/value

Providing health promotion activities for young prisoners while in custodial settings is key to addressing their unmet health and well-being needs and to facilitate their reintegration back into the community. Despite the barriers identified by this research, health promotion is to some extent being delivered in the partner countries and provides a foundation upon which further implementation of health promotion activities can be built especially when the benefits of health promotion activities, like dealing with the common problems of alcohol and drug addiction, mental health and communicable diseases are linked to successful reintegration.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Abstract

Subject area

Marketing Management.

Study level/applicability

BBA Students of Marketing Management.

Case overview

The brand ⇓Dentonic” by Ala Chemicals was originally launched as a tooth powder meant for the middle and lower socioeconomic classes. The tooth powder was a hugely successful product. Dentonic tooth powder held the highest market share in the category at 80 per cent in the 1990s. However, the tooth powder market in the urban areas is declining and consumer preference is slowly moving to toothpastes. Although tooth powder is still used in the rural areas, some toothpaste manufacturers have extended their reach at the lower end of the market offering consumers “value propositions” in the shape of toothpaste at the comparable price of tooth powder. The market for dental cleaning products has seen a shift in terms of young consumers switching from powder to the lower-priced toothpaste brands. The company Ala Chemicals did not want to sit back and face a declining tooth powder market. Therefore, they launched a premium quality toothpaste by the same brand name, Dentonic, and made efforts to penetrate the premium segment of toothpaste. However, the marketing strategies did not have the desired effect and the company was unable to get consumers to accept Dentonic as a premium toothpaste. Although Ala Chemicals indulged in promotional spending, using social media, offering a high-quality product and making it accessible with competitive prices, somehow they were unable to create the required pull.

Expected learning outcomes

This study provides an example of how “over positioning” of a brand can be an impediment in the case of a brand extension, especially when a lower end brand is positioned as a premium brand. It is also meant to show that the product concept alone cannot lead to marketing success and consumer acceptance. It also exposes students to the requirement of creating a Unique Value Proposition in a brand and the difficulties of pursuing a segment invasion, without considering the entry barriers, and the marketing strategies/positions of competitors.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Antonio Koceski and Vladimir Trajkovski

The aim of this study is to determine what changes occur in the health status of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to neurotypical controls.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to determine what changes occur in the health status of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to neurotypical controls.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed a comparative analysis of data collected from 72 subjects with ASD and 75 neurotypical controls aged 3–24 years using the Rochester Health Status Survey IV (RHSS-IV). A structured individual interview was conducted to compare the health status of subjects in Macedonia.

Findings

A majority of people with ASD take vitamins, supplements and use recommended drug therapies compared to the neurotypical population and experience a larger number of side effects (p = 0.000). Compared to people with neurotypical development, children with ASD have a higher prevalence of oral ulcers (31.9% vs 17.3%; p = 0.039), changes in neurological health status – epilepsy (19.4% vs 2.7%; p = 0.001) and ADD/ADHD (only persons with ASD-19.4%; p = 0.000); respiratory diseases – angina (30.5% vs 8%; p = 0.000), rhinitis and/or sinusitis (40.3% vs 17.3%; p = 0.02); changes in the gastrointestinal system – constipation (31.9% vs 10.6%; p = 0.02), intestinal inflammation (19.4% vs 8%; p = 0.043), permeable intestines (only persons with ASD – 13.9%; p = 0.000) and the presence of the fungus Candida albicans (19.4% vs 4%; p = 0.043); psychiatric disorders – sleep problems (only in people with ASD – 18%; p = 0.000) and tics (6.9% vs 2.6%; p = 0.25) and skin diseases – eczema/allergic skin rash (36.1% vs 18.7%; p = 0.02).

Originality/value

Many children with ASD have health problems. These findings support and complement the professional literature on their mutual causality.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Anne Coughlan, Julie Hennessy, Andrei Najjar, Evan Auyang, Winston Batanghari and Craig Cartwright

Align Inc. is a start-up company with a revolutionary, patent-protected new technology for straightening teeth called Invisalign. Invisalign is a set of invisible plastic…

Abstract

Align Inc. is a start-up company with a revolutionary, patent-protected new technology for straightening teeth called Invisalign. Invisalign is a set of invisible plastic aligners made to each patient's specific needs that substitute for metal or ceramic braces in adults (it is not sold for children's orthodontic needs). The company has created tremendous consumer awareness and affect for its product, yet sales results are dismal. Requires the reader to analyze the reasons for such poor sales and what to do to remedy the problem.

To examine distribution channel issues as well as the marketing mix for a new product introduction.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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