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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Abiola Adeniyi, Leeann Donnelly, Patricia Janssen, Cecilia Jevitt, Michael Siarkowski and Mario Brondani

Integrating preventive oral care into prenatal care is suggested as a strategy for reducing the burden of oral diseases among pregnant women and their offspring. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrating preventive oral care into prenatal care is suggested as a strategy for reducing the burden of oral diseases among pregnant women and their offspring. This scoping review sought to synthesize available information and identify knowledge gaps on integrating oral health into prenatal care.

Design/methodology/approach

The scoping review was conducted based on the Joanna Briggs Institute scoping review framework using the following databases: CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, ProQuest Dissertation and theses Global, Psychinfo and Web of Science®. No search limits were used. Content analysis of the included articles was performed to identify conceptual frameworks, types of integration used, study designs, study objectives and outcomes.

Findings

Overall, 2,861 references were obtained from the databases search; and based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria 35 references were included in the final analysis. Of these 35 references, one document presented a conceptual model, six documents reviewed guidelines for integrating oral health in prenatal care, two were policy documents aimed at interprofessional collaboration for oral health during pregnancy, eight documents described programs focused on providing oral care during pregnancy, five of the references were literature reviews and the remaining 13 evaluated the impact of integration. Linkages between healthcare professionals were the most common type of integration used.

Research limitations/implications

Despite advances in understanding integrated care concepts for healthcare delivery, there is little evidence available on the impact of the various types of, and strategies for, integrating oral health into prenatal care. Future research to bridge the identified gaps is recommended.

Originality/value

The originality of this study is to provide evidence on integrated oral healthcare during pregnancy.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2011

P. Pugo Gunsam and S. Banka

This paper seeks to assess the oral health status and behaviour of a sample of the Mauritian population visiting private dental clinics.

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653

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to assess the oral health status and behaviour of a sample of the Mauritian population visiting private dental clinics.

Design/methodology/approach

Oral health status was determined using the World Health Organization (Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index indicating the prevalence of caries, and factors associated with oral health behaviour were investigated. Cross‐sectional data on oral health behaviour and demographic characteristics were collected through a structured 22‐item self‐designed survey questionnaire administered to a randomly selected sample of 250 Mauritians visiting private dental clinics. The data were statistically analysed to examine associations between oral health variables.

Findings

Analyses revealed significant correlations between DMFT scores, age and socioeconomic status. Over 80 per cent of the children below the age of 11 had DMFT scores higher than the acceptable WHO value of 3, and most adults older than 45 years had DMFT scores higher than 7. A large majority (85 per cent) reported using both fluoride toothpaste and tongue scrapers, but none reported using dental floss. Those who brushed teeth only once daily had high DMFT scores. Among males, smokers had significantly higher mean DMFT than non‐smokers. Females demonstrated better rates of good oral health behaviour than males. Respondents from higher socioeconomic classes were between three to five times more likely to visit dental clinics than those from lower classes.

Practical implications

This study reveals the need for intervention programmes to raise awareness of good oral health practices among the Mauritian people.

Originality/value

The results identified the high risk groups and highlighted the need for dental education, taking into consideration socioeconomic status and sociodemographics in order to enable Mauritians to become oral‐hygiene‐conscious and active partners for the management of oral health and prevention of systemic diseases.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Kjersti Berge Evensen, Vibeke Hervik Bull and Linda Ness

Prisoners have poorer oral health than the general population. Good oral health is essential for both social and physical well-being. For prisoners, poor oral health is…

Abstract

Purpose

Prisoners have poorer oral health than the general population. Good oral health is essential for both social and physical well-being. For prisoners, poor oral health is also related to drug use after release, whereas good oral health is related to successful reintegration into society. The purpose of this study was twofold: to examine the effect of an intervention based on motivational interviewing (MI) on prisoners’ oral health-related behavior and to assess if the intervention is a good fit for this population.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 16 prisoners in a Norwegian prison were offered a brief MI-based intervention focusing on changing their oral health-related behavior. An oral examination was also performed and the prisoners received a small package containing oral hygiene aids. Two weeks later, a second oral examination and a semi-structured interview were conducted to explore the effect of the intervention and examine the prisoners’ responses to the intervention. Qualitative data analyzes were guided by thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that the intervention had positive effects on both the prisoners’ motivation to use oral health-related behavior and their performance of oral health-related behavior. The findings also indicate that the intervention was well adapted to the target population.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that explore the effect of an intervention in improving prisoners’ oral health and bridges a knowledge gap in the literature. The findings may increase the understanding of how dental services should be organized and offered to provide dental health care to this vulnerable group.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Kirsti Kasila and Marita Poskiparta

At the moment, Finnish oral health care is undergoing many changes. Little attention has been paid to issues of organisational culture and communication in Finnish oral

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2104

Abstract

At the moment, Finnish oral health care is undergoing many changes. Little attention has been paid to issues of organisational culture and communication in Finnish oral health care. Yet the question of culture is of primary importance for changes in an organisation and for planning and reconstructing the rational functioning of an organisation. The purpose of this paper is to examine Finnish public oral health care within a theoretical framework of organisational culture and to identify the various cultural traits that appear to characterise Finnish oral health care. Using a cultural point of view, we develop an orientation for understanding more profoundly and specifically the processes concerning the functioning and change of oral health care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1970

Sirinthip Amornsuradech and Warangkana Vejvithee

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and oral health among Thai adults.

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1121

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and oral health among Thai adults.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a cross-sectional analytical study using secondary data from the 7th Thailand National Oral Health Survey (2012). Age group 35–44 years old samples were used to represent the working age population. Oral health outcome was determined by untreated dental caries. SES was indicated by income, education and occupational groups. Demographic background, oral health-related behavior and access to dental service were adjusted for analysis. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between independent variables and oral health outcome.

Findings

People with lower education showed a higher odds ratio for having untreated dental caries before and after controlling for related variables. Those living in the north and northeast, using additional cleaning tools and going to the public provider for dental service also showed better oral health.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study is that the cross-sectional study cannot indicate casual relationships. The national oral health survey was not designed to find relationships between factors. The access to data and measurement of SES was limited. The policy maker should emphasize on people with lower education which have a higher risk for dental caries to improve oral health in disadvantaged groups. Future research should include all related factors in the study including diet and knowledge about oral health. Moreover, oral health outcome is a long-term effect which accumulated through a lifetime. The social class might change over time and so do behaviors.

Originality/value

There is socioeconomic inequality in dental caries of Thai working age population.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-940X

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Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Erin Pullen, Brea L. Perry and Gerardo Maupome

Latinos in the United States have poor outcomes for periodontal and dental health. However, a detailed description of the mechanisms driving these patterns has only…

Abstract

Latinos in the United States have poor outcomes for periodontal and dental health. However, a detailed description of the mechanisms driving these patterns has only recently started to be addressed in the literature. In the current study, we explore relationships between individual-level characteristics of Mexican immigrants, properties of their networks, and experiences of dental problems. Specifically, using data from an urban community of Mexican immigrants to the American Midwest (n = 332), this study examines how characteristics of oral health matters (OHM) discussion networks and individual-level sociodemographic characteristics are associated with four adverse oral health outcomes. The results provide strong support for relationships between immigrants’ network characteristics and dental problems. We find that people with more dental problems talk about these issues more frequently with network ties. Conversely, stronger relationships with OHM discussion networks, as measured by mean closeness, are predictive of fewer dental problems. In addition, we identify a link between perceptions of alters’ knowledge about teeth, mouth, and gums and egos reporting better oral health outcomes. The observed patterns are suggestive of mechanisms of social influence that are well replicated in the social, medical, and public health literatures, but that have seldom been empirically tested in the domain of oral health. Though preliminary, our findings suggest a potential explanatory role for social networks in some of the most important questions and problems in oral health disparities research. In all, our findings suggest that social network members are active participants in the management and response to oral health problems in this immigrant group and should be considered an important factor in the development and course of diseases.

Details

Immigration and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-062-4

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2014

Alex Kizito, Meredith Caitlin, Yili Wang, Arabat Kasangaki and Andrew J. Macnab

The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and potential for the WHO health promoting schools (HPS) to improve children ' s oral health, and describe…

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1227

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and potential for the WHO health promoting schools (HPS) to improve children ' s oral health, and describe validated quantitative methodologies and qualitative approaches to measure program impact.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical discussion of the impact of poor oral health and potential for school-based educational intervention, and evaluation methodologies used by the authors.

Findings

Using HPS to improve oral health is relevant because dental caries and gingivitis/periodontitis negatively impact children ' s health and quality of life worldwide. WHO has called for effective community-based oral health promotion programs; intervention is simple and low cost; robust evaluation measures exist – the decayed missing filled teeth index and change in cavity rate allow quantitative comparison of oral health status; and questionnaires document changes in knowledge, practices, diet, health-related quality of life, and pain.

Practical implications

Poor oral health is a major health issue. Established measures to improve oral hygiene offer an achievable, low-cost HPS entry point; the “knowledge” and “healthy practices” components central to the WHO HPS model are tried and tested and multiple potential benefits are documented. Poor oral health is a non-stigmatized issue, hence intervention is readily accepted, and effective evaluation tools provide evidence of program effect over a short (two to three years) timeframe.

Originality/value

Oral health promotion is more affordable and sustainable than the cost of traditional restorative treatments especially in middle- and low-income countries. Success with oral health leads to confidence for expansion of HPS activities to address other health issues relevant to the school community.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Jintana Sarayuthpitak, Sarinya Rodpipat, Sanong Ekgasit and Dean M. Ravizza

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of oral hygiene promoting program (OHPP) using a smartphone endomicroscope among students in elementary schools…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of oral hygiene promoting program (OHPP) using a smartphone endomicroscope among students in elementary schools in Bangkok, Thailand, to enable their oral hygiene maintenance and to compare oral health outcomes in the intervention program between the experimental and control groups.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quasi-experimental research study consisting of two groups, a pretest, a posttest and a follow-up design. The student sample consisted of 59 fifth graders who matched the study criteria on medium and low levels of teeth brushing skills. There were 29 experimental group participants who completed the six-week OHPP using a smartphone endomicroscope. Another 30 participants formed the control group involved in the ordinary oral health education program. The comparison data for oral health behaviors (knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP)) and oral hygiene were statistically analyzed by using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).

Findings

Results indicated that the experimental group exhibited higher oral health behaviors regarding KAPs and oral hygiene related to teeth cleanliness and gum health than the control group in the postexperimental and follow-up phases. However, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with regard to tongue cleanliness.

Originality/value

The students maintain their own oral hygiene due to a provision of activities related to KAP concerns. The instrument helped the students to find tooth decay and dental plaque associated with teeth cleanliness after brushing their teeth.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Andrew Lindridge, Susan MacAskill, Wendy Gnich, Douglas Eadie and Ingrid Holme

By applying ecological models of health behaviour to marketing communications to achieve behaviour change, this paper aims to illustrate the importance of taking into…

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3259

Abstract

Purpose

By applying ecological models of health behaviour to marketing communications to achieve behaviour change, this paper aims to illustrate the importance of taking into account various economic, environmental and social influences.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-part study was undertaken. Part one involved exploring the lived worlds of the targeted population. Part two explored how the needs of the target audience informed a social marketing communications strategy. This was illustrated through Childsmile, a Scottish Government funded oral health institution.

Findings

A variety of intra- and inter-personal influences where identified that encouraged or discouraged oral health. Complementing this was how these needs are incorporated into an ecological social marketing communications campaign. Although the long term effects of the ecological social marketing campaign will not become evident for a number of years, initial results indicate its important role in changing behaviour.

Practical implications

The importance of engaging with various groups within social marketing is shown. Specifically, the need to understand and encourage interaction between individuals, their community, health institutions and the Government.

Social implications

Behaviour change, through social marketing communications, is possible among socio-economic deprived groups. Change supported with face to face interactions with health professionals.

Originality/value

Previous criticisms of social marketing research being American-centric, and avoiding issues around socio-economic deprivation are addressed. In addressing this, the paper also answers calls for research into ecological models of social marketing communications to understand how influences affect its applicability.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Nicolas Giraudeau, Camille Inquimbert, Robin Delafoy, Paul Tramini, Jean Valcarcel and Fadi Meroueh

In France, all incarcerated prisoners are required to undergo a dental examination (Ministère de la santé et de la protection sociale, 2004 and Ministère de la justice…

Abstract

Purpose

In France, all incarcerated prisoners are required to undergo a dental examination (Ministère de la santé et de la protection sociale, 2004 and Ministère de la justice, 2004). However, only one in two prisoners benefits from this oral health check-up. Oral teleconsultation could improve the quality of oral care in prisons. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The focus of this study was therefore to apply oral teleconsultation as an experiment. Using an oral teleconsultation system, a dentist and a nurse were separately asked to give patients a score, according to how urgently their dental issue needed to be treated. This score will henceforth be referred to as the “dental emergency scores given”.

Findings

The separate dental emergency scores given by the dentist and the nurse were compared and the results demonstrate the following: – 36.7 per cent (11) of the two scores were equal – 53.3 per cent (16) of the two scores differed by 1 point – 10 per cent (3) of the two scores differed by 2 points. The average score of the nurse was 2.23 and that of the dentist was 2.13. The small disparity should not obscure the fact that 63 per cent of the diagnoses turned out to be incorrect.

Practical implications

Dental care could easily be improved with oral teleconsultation as a care plan could be developed for each patient.

Social implications

The condition of one’s dental health is, of course, very important for general health, but it also affects social aspects. Good oral hygiene and health are very important when looking for a job after having been released from prison.

Originality/value

This is the first study on oral teleconsultation in prisons. Dental care is rarely studied on prisoners. Telemedicine in dentistry is just beginning all over the world. This study is the first step of an extensive project in the University Hospital of Montpellier and the Villeneuve-les-Maguelone prison.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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